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Thread: Good read....

  1. #1
    AandF6969's Avatar
    AandF6969 is offline Made Up Of Wires
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    Good read....

    Got this off a website, its by a dude named G Diesel.


    Bodybuilders are the hardest working athletes in the world. Point blank. No athletic pursuit in this world requires a comparable sort of single-minded focus. Bodybuilding is not a mere physical past time. It is a way of life. 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year, the bodybuilder pursues excellence. The day of the contest is nearly a competitive afterthought for the bodybuilder. Every meal and every training session is a battle of will, an all out struggle for supremacy against the most daunting of all foes. Yourself.

    Sure, greatness in any physical arena necessitates dedication and practice. The extra hours spent on the field or the court can cumulatively make up the difference between bench warmer and All-American or between also ran and finishing in the money. Hell, to be great in anything, you need to want it more than the next guy. Say goodbye to regular eating and casual trips to the gym. Day in and day out the bodybuilder must stalk improvement. There will be no repose and no sabbatical. There truly is no rest for the weak, and even less for the strong. ****, even in a bodybuilder’s off-season he busts his ass–the weights get heavier and the meals get bigger. Compare that to a spring spent playing golf and sipping cocktails at the country club. You sure you don’t want to consider strapping that helmet back on?

    Not everyone is cut out for this stuff. If you’re still with me, chances are you have already made your choice. You are one of the few, the dedicated, the demented. Those sick enough in the dome to devote their lives to a brutal, regimented lifestyle with very little potential for personal accolades or the accumulation of financial wealth. For this you deserve to be revered, or at the very least observed for science. Everyday is game day for the bodybuilder. The gym is your field of play and you lay it all on the line every time, as if today may be your last. Driven by the desire to present the best physique possible, you view each training session as a challenge, time spent as an investment in a bigger, better version of yourself. The dues must be paid day in and day out and you are more than happy to ante up. Ask any champion and he’ll give you the 411–the big contest is not won on the stage, it is won in small increments every time you murder yourself in the gym, months out from the show.

    If you train five days a week, in a year that totals 260 gym sessions, not even counting pre-contest cardio which could also be thrown in the mix for in excess of two hours daily. Compare that to a pro baseball player and his 162-game season, which is no doubt tough when you consider all the travel involved. But lets get real. They get paid millions, never have to play on no carbs and the only time they squat is on the ****ter. Truth be told, most athletes of all varieties spend some time in the weight room. What was once frowned upon as fare for musclebound meatheads is now an essential element of success on any athlete’s chosen field of play.

    What really separates bodybuilding from every other sporting event known to man is diet. Check out Sportscenter some night and you’re sure to see some sign of lacking physical fitness. Imagine an elite athlete with narrow shoulders or a belly that hangs over his belt, faux pas in the bodybuilding world and veritable impossibilities considering the regimented diet that is at the heart of the lifestyle. Only bodybuilders weigh their food, tally their protein and calories, travel with a cooler full of apportioned meals and drink nutrients almost as often as they eat them. This is the stuff that separates the men from the boys: eating not when you want to, but when you have to; eating not what you like to but what you must. All in the name of progress. Getting closer and closer to the freak you need to be- one dry ass chicken breast at a time. This is a mind state that most folks can’t quite grasp and to which very few can truly relate. Don’t think that effort goes unnoticed, Animal.

    Where the average hockey player can blend into the rest of society when out among the public, the bodybuilder wears his uniform out into the world every single day. Beyond the sneers of the jealous and the misinformed, above the drug accusers and the naysayers, the bodybuilder stands proud for he knows how few could ever walk in his shoes. The rest of the athletic culture has come to appreciate the sacrifice and dedication of the bodybuilder and has come to value the benefits of conditioned muscularity and explosive strength. The physiques of the Olympic sprinter or the NFL linebacker are testaments to the influence of the bodybuilding aesthetic and the new standard that is being set in athletic culture. A standard chiseled into place by the elite fraternity of which you and I are both members.

    It is we, the select few, the Brotherhood of Iron, who have placed the bar for athletic discipline and effort so high. Each time you squat ‘til you puke, pop the tupperware on your chicken and rice, blend a shake or can’t get out of bed because you are so sore from deads... every time you chalk up the bar or wrap your knees, know that you are the one… the one willing to do what it takes, to leave it all on the table, to go the extra mile. The one who could give a crap about a blurb in the sports page or the admiration of onlookers. You are the one. An Animal. You are a bodybuilder–the hardest working athlete in the world. Hell yeah.
    Last edited by AandF6969; 07-16-2004 at 12:37 AM.

  2. #2
    AandF6969's Avatar
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    **** it, did anyone read this? lol...

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    nice post...

    -B-

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    Prime's Avatar
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    Yeah, i think bb is one of the hardest, not THE hardest sport. What about gymnasts that train 5-7 days a week for hours a day? Marathon runners that put up 100 of miles a week? There are loads of bloody hard sports. I would say that professional wresteling must be up there too, i mean look at guys like bautista and benoit, they have a bodybuilders body, they are traveling 5 days a week, working almost every day of the year and getting teh **** kicked out of them, yet they show up looking like they do. Diet, training, travel they do it all and probably harder then almost any bodybuilder. JMO.

  5. #5
    bor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AandF6969
    They get paid millions, never have to play on no carbs and the only time they squat is on the ****ter.



    I really like these motivating articles, they really pump me up, can't wait to go the gym! Is this from that animal pak site?They have some good reads over there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prime
    Yeah, i think bb is one of the hardest, not THE hardest sport. What about gymnasts that train 5-7 days a week for hours a day? Marathon runners that put up 100 of miles a week? There are loads of bloody hard sports. I would say that professional wresteling must be up there too, i mean look at guys like bautista and benoit, they have a bodybuilders body, they are traveling 5 days a week, working almost every day of the year and getting teh **** kicked out of them, yet they show up looking like they do. Diet, training, travel they do it all and probably harder then almost any bodybuilder. JMO.
    Hands down, IMO, the hardest sport in terms of training/diet is real wrestling. Not the fake stuff but real college/olympic wrestling. If you have never wrestled then you have no idea. I have one brother who played football in college and one that wrestled in college, and I can tell you that the time wrestlers put in on the mats and in the gym is twice as much as any other athlete. Anyway, just thought i would throw that in.

    -B-

  7. #7
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    w_rballs is offline Anabolic Member
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    that **** was soo inspiring. im about to take the rest of the day off just to go lift now. i love **** like this, makes me remember why i got into this stuff again when i have doubts sometimes.

  8. #8
    AandF6969's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AandF6969
    Where the average hockey player can blend into the rest of society when out among the public, the bodybuilder wears his uniform out into the world every single day.
    This is my favorite part of the post... I think it is from the AnimalPak website, it sure sounds like it. I love those ads too, I ordered a 22x16 print of one of them off the website.

  9. #9
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    I think that gymnists are the hardest working athletes in the world actually.......JMO. All the ones I know follow a tight nutrition, rest, and workout regimen just like I do, but they stretch and do routines for like 4 hours everyday.

  10. #10
    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    Bodybuilding is for p*ssies.



    ~SC~

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