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  1. #1
    Dave321 is offline AR's Salad Tossing Connoisseur
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    Meth Dealers Get Life In Quebec...

    I just heard on the news yesterday that Quebec Canada has changed its criminal laws against Crystal Meth dealers, now giving them life as a sentence if caught trafficing... I am all for this, fuk those guys, so many kids are getting their hands on the drug and it always seems readily available to them. What are your thoughts, do you feel this sentence is a little harse or are you all for it?

  2. #2
    IBdmfkr's Avatar
    IBdmfkr is offline AR VET
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    nope this is an evil drug that ruins people's lives. Even with this sentence it won't stop people from doing it though, sad.

  3. #3
    Dave321 is offline AR's Salad Tossing Connoisseur
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    Quote Originally Posted by IBdmfkr
    nope this is an evil drug that ruins people's lives. Even with this sentence it won't stop people from doing it though, sad.
    BUT, it will make dealers think twice I believe... at least I hope so!

  4. #4
    ReX357's Avatar
    ReX357 is offline "Toughest & Best Looking Guy Around Here"
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    Seriously, I have yet to encounter Meth in Québec... It is more located on the west coast (Vancouver, Victoria, etc.). The law was passed for Canada, not just in Québec.

    Also, I don't think anyone ever got life for dealing in Canada. First offense you get 2 less 1 I believe.

    And you purge 1/6th of the sentence because it's not a "violent" crime.

    So you end up doing 4 month in a provincial facility.
    Last edited by ReX357; 08-12-2005 at 11:35 AM.

  5. #5
    Dave321 is offline AR's Salad Tossing Connoisseur
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReX357
    Seriously, I have yet to encounter Meth in Québec... It is more located on the west coast (Vancouver, Victoria, etc.). The law was passed for Canada, not just in Québec.

    Also, I don't think anyone ever got life for dealing in Canada. First offense you get 2 less 1 I believe.
    that is true... before... but new laws govern life sentence for meth dealers

  6. #6
    Evil Predator's Avatar
    Evil Predator is offline Senior Member
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    **** life, give em death so that theres is the last life they destroyed

  7. #7
    Dave321 is offline AR's Salad Tossing Connoisseur
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Predator
    **** life, give em death so that theres is the last life they destroyed
    WOOOOOOOOORD UP!

  8. #8
    BeerBaron's Avatar
    BeerBaron is offline Senior Member
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    Canada has a reasonable perspective on drugs. I agree with them on this one.

  9. #9
    juicy_brucy's Avatar
    juicy_brucy is offline Ripped, not bulky
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Sane
    I just heard on the news yesterday that Quebec Canada has changed its criminal laws against Crystal Meth dealers, now giving them life as a sentence if caught trafficing... I am all for this, fuk those guys, so many kids are getting their hands on the drug and it always seems readily available to them. What are your thoughts, do you feel this sentence is a little harse or are you all for it?
    Those guys can rot in hell. I live in one of the places that produces the most meth for Canada - Perth county!
    so I really could care less about these dealers. They are also part of the reason that my city is over-run with fake juice so these guys can rot in hell.

  10. #10
    Dave321 is offline AR's Salad Tossing Connoisseur
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    Quote Originally Posted by juicy_brucy
    Those guys can rot in hell. I live in one of the places that produces the most meth for Canada - Perth county!
    so I really could care less about these dealers. They are also part of the reason that my city is over-run with fake juice so these guys can rot in hell.
    couldn't agree wit cha more brotha! My parents live in Stratford and it's almost as bad as perth for meth.... weird artsy communities! Anyway, they can rot those low life pieces of sheit!

  11. #11
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    New law covers making or selling meth...

    http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2...168762-cp.html

    Crystal meth penalty hiked
    By AMY CARMICHAEL

    VANCOUVER (CP) - Penalties for possessing, making and trafficking crystal meth - a drug called the poor man's cocaine - were increased Thursday by the federal government, but it's a strategy that a frontline social worker says has proved worthless in the fight against coke and heroin.

    The stiffer sentences on methamphetamine, also known as crystal meth, are now in line with offences associated with heroin and cocaine. Justice Minister Irwin Cotler said specially designated prosecutors will also deal with the most serious cases and will speak to judges in sentencing about the corrosive, poisonous nature of the drug and how it destroys lives.

    "Judges look at the gravity of the offence and the responsibility of the offender in determining sentences," Cotler told a news conference in Vancouver.

    "We are making a clear statement today about the gravity of the offence and the responsibility of the offender."

    The maximum penalty for production and distribution has increased to life in prison from 10 years.

    Neither Cotler nor Health Minister Ujjal Dosanjh, who flanked him during the announcement, could think of a case where anyone in Canada had been sentenced to 10 years in jail for a drug offence, let alone life in prison.

    But Cotler said that's not what it's about, adding the government's announcement sends a message to judges, dealers and users.

    People working in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, which is teeming with addicts strung out on crystal meth and small-time pushers, were skeptical about the government's approach.

    "Well, it sure worked with heroin and cocaine," said Mark Townsend, sarcastically. "We don't have any problems with those drugs anymore."

    Townsend, who works with the Portland Hotel Society, an organization that houses addicts, said he's happy the federal government is paying attention to the crystal meth problem because it's a huge, but he doesn't think they've got the solution.

    "We're just chasing our tail here. Addiction is ultimately about people's pain and dealing with that pain," he said.

    "In the history of this area people have used all kinds of things. Aqua Velva after shave, cooking wine. It's not about the stuff or the crystal meth, it's about the pain and suffering and complex issues that you're still going to be dealing with."

    Dosanjh conceded there aren't enough programs to help addicts.

    "I think we need to do more," he said. "That is part of the national drug strategy. There is money attached to that and it's currently flowing to different programs."

    He said the federal government needs to co-ordinate its education and awareness programs with the provincial governments.

    The consequences of crystal meth use range from increasing violent crime, including homicide, assault and sexual abuse, to property crimes.

    Children are often endangered when they are living around labs from exposure to the toxic, flammable and explosive manufacturing process. Crystal meth labs also create toxic waste.

    The drug can induce mental illness, psychosis and death.

    Ruth Layne, a founding member of Crystal Meth Victoria, watched her daughter's 20-year-old friend lose control to the drug and eventually commit suicide last August.

    "He took his own life, in large part due to this drug. One of the other directors of our society has a child who is 14 years old and dealing with this drug.

    "Crystal meth use has gone up 40 per cent around the world in the last six years, it's spreading so fast that many communities in Canada don't even know it's a problem on their streets."

    Telephone surveys by Health Canada actually show a low rate of meth use in the general population.

    For example, a major survey done in 2004 asked people about their use of speed, an informal term that covers all amphetamines, including meth. It showed that 0.8 per cent of Canadians reported using speed at least once in the previous 12 months.

    That amounts to about 200,000 people but the health agency says it knows it has missed hard-to-reach populations such as street youth. Information from other sources suggests that meth use is much higher among this group, says Health Canada.

    Other information such as hospital admissions shows that the number of people seeking treatment for meth problems is growing. Police have also uncovered more clandestine laboratories producing meth and have seized greater quantities of the drug, all pointing to increasing meth use, particularly in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec.

    Layne applauded the federal government and said she wants to see more extreme sentences for people who are making and selling meth because it has such disastrous effects and is highly addictive.

    "The problem is that the courts often don't use the maximum penalties available to them. I hope that government's reaction to meth with this new law has sent the courts a message that we want them to start using the maximums."

    Conservative MP Vic Toews and B.C. Solicitor General John Les called for mandatory minimums Thursday for production and trafficking of crystal meth. Les said the crime is "akin to being an accomplice in murder."

    "Too often we see these people getting house arrest," he said.

    Toews, the party's justice critic, said the move is useless because courts aren't using the current maximums.

    "We have seen consistently in the past that when maximum sentences are raised, there is no corresponding increase in penalties."

    Cotler said he's opposed to mandatory minimum sentencing, which is used in the U.S.

    "Research shows mandatory minimums don't serve as a deterrent and actually have the opposite effect," Cotler said.

    He said the sentences are only one tool the government is using in a comprehensive program to stem the use of the drug.

    The federal government is also working on legislation he expects to be passed in the fall that will make it harder to get chemicals to make the highly addictive drug.

    "They would require a licence and permit and the like," said Dosanjh.

    "A regime is being put in place to ensure that we have the ability to make simple possession an effective weapon."

    Many of the ingredients that go into the manufacture of crystal meth can be found at local convenience, drug and hardware stores. They're found in allergy remedies and other medicines containing pseudoephedrine, as well as in acetone, rubbing alcohol, iodine, starter fluid, drain cleaner, batteries, paint thinner and propane.

    The mix is volatile, making the explosion risk in labs extremely high.

    Some U.S. states have put Sudafed and similar medicines behind the counter to combat the problem.

    Dosanjh said the federal government isn't doing that, but he expects individual provinces will act in an area that is their jurisdiction.

    B.C. said it is already working with pharmacists and retailers under the Meth Watch program. Staff are trained to monitor sales of meth ingredients and call police when they are suspicious of a customer.

    Saskatchewan Premier Lorne Calvert, among the premiers who led the fight for increased penalties involving the drug, said the federal government's moves will help act as a strong deterrent.

    "When you see penalties that would require life imprisonment, the same kind of penalty that you see for the trafficking in heroin, that has to send out a very significant signal," Calvert said at the premiers' meeting in Banff, Alta.

    "This is not just a Western problem. A few years ago the incidents of crystal meth in the United States were similar to what we're seeing in parts of Canada. Within a matter of three or four years this has become an epidemic."

  12. #12
    IronFreakX's Avatar
    IronFreakX is offline Banned
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    Any one can make meth...one of the easiest drugs to make...i just hope the laws bout ephedrine stay the same and dont get worse....(ephedrine is needed to make meth if u didnt know)

  13. #13
    GeeOweDee's Avatar
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    I would agree and disagree depends on the case

  14. #14
    symmetry101 is offline Associate Member
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    I think they need to look into more rehabilitation. I agree the laws need to be stricter but to throw everyone into the same category sentence is ridiculous. It has to be a case by case scenario. No two people are the same so why should their sentence. People risk death evryday doing stupid things and they will risk life in prison since the pay off is so great. Hopefully it can deter some people from selling but look at history or drug use, its never gonna go away.

  15. #15
    smokethedays's Avatar
    smokethedays is offline Veni, Vedi, Vici.
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    Meth dealers get a Escalade on DUBS, Benzo and a beach house in the US
    oh yeah, and a Rap/Hip-Hop record.

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