Anabolics
Search More Than 6,000,000 Posts

View Poll Results: Cell phones. Are they safe and do you use them?

Voters
10. You may not vote on this poll
  • I use my cell phone to conduct business with

    3 30.00%
  • I slightly use the cell phone to discuss gear

    2 20.00%
  • No cell phones are not safe

    1 10.00%
  • I would rather use a cell phone than any addy

    4 40.00%
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: cell phone use

  1. #1
    Bigbowboski's Avatar
    Bigbowboski is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    581

    cell phone use

    Is it safe to talk about gear on the cell phone?

    Can cell phones be tapped by feds? or other law officials?

  2. #2
    decadbal's Avatar
    decadbal is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    North Charlotte
    Posts
    11,924
    yes they can, its best to not go around talkin or braggin about using or having aas, or use various names, i call my stuff girlscout cookies and the few ppl who know about them refer to them as the same

  3. #3
    Bigbowboski's Avatar
    Bigbowboski is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    581
    The if they can be tapped, why doesnt the phone numbers show up on 911 screens?

  4. #4
    monstercojones's Avatar
    monstercojones is offline The Anabolic Assassin
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    AnabolicReview.com
    Posts
    3,181
    the numbers do show up on 911 screens, and the location as well if you have a GPS phone...

    i know of at lwast 2 dealers that got nabbed for having their cell phones tapped, in one instance, over 50 people got rounded up in one day because of taps on a dealer's phone...

  5. #5
    decadbal's Avatar
    decadbal is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    North Charlotte
    Posts
    11,924
    dont believe everything u see on tv, they can trace your phone or the call soon as it connects, they can listen for 20secs and if you mention anything illegal keep listening...... find out the laws if your gonna break em bro, ignorance wont keep you out of jail holding bubbas soap

  6. #6
    Bigbowboski's Avatar
    Bigbowboski is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    581
    And just to clear up any misunderstanding..

    A tap is if they somehow get your phone and place a bug or tap on it right?

    I mean they cant just go to the cell phone company and say i want to lilsten to his conversations..can they?

  7. #7
    Bigbowboski's Avatar
    Bigbowboski is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    581
    we have a state of the art system in the dispatch center, the CAD will not show a cell phone on there

  8. #8
    Superhuman's Avatar
    Superhuman is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,816
    the only thing that would allow them to do that is the patriot act, otherwise it's an invasion of privacy. Also, with the patriot act you have to be under suspision of anti-US action; terrorism

  9. #9
    Superhuman's Avatar
    Superhuman is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,816
    they need a warrant to be able to legally tap your phone.

  10. #10
    Bigbowboski's Avatar
    Bigbowboski is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    581
    And recently the FBI requested permission from the FCC to use, among other things, dialed digit extraction technology. Here's how it works: If you are on your cell phone and accessing your bank using touch tones to punch in an account number, the FBI wants to be able to intercept that information under the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA).

    The wireless industry took that FBI request to court; the courts ruled with the industry and against the FBI. At this point, any information passed via the phone that is not the phone number and location is not available to law enforcement agencies without a court order.

    check this out!

  11. #11
    Bigbowboski's Avatar
    Bigbowboski is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    581
    heres the article in its entirity


    For your information, last year 911 received approximately 150 million calls, of which 45 million were from wireless phones, according to Scott Petronis at MapInfo, in Troy, N.Y.

    The question, as always, is whether the government is a benevolent or malevolent monster that in this case will use location-based technology to track your whereabouts. The answer? I don't know.

    Certainly Uncle Sam has been in the news a great deal of late regarding its various high-tech surveillance operations, Carnivore and Echelon, for example.

    Carnivore is the e-mail and Web surfing surveillance application used by government agencies to track bad guys. Echelon is the supposed worldwide surveillance satellite system that monitors calls, listening for key words and phrases such as "bomb," "kill the president," "nerve gas," and so forth.

    And recently the FBI requested permission from the FCC to use, among other things, dialed digit extraction technology. Here's how it works: If you are on your cell phone and accessing your bank using touch tones to punch in an account number, the FBI wants to be able to intercept that information under the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA).

    The wireless industry took that FBI request to court; the courts ruled with the industry and against the FBI. At this point, any information passed via the phone that is not the phone number and location is not available to law enforcement agencies without a court order.

    Using today's technology, information passes in random encoded packets; someone intercepting a data transmission would not be able to tell what is in each packet until all the packets were decoded. It is all or nothing. So in the interests of privacy, the courts said it shall be nothing, according to Travis Larsen, a spokesman for the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association.

    Starting in October, cell phone manufacturers, working in partnership with the wireless network providers, will include the technology -- there are a number of ways this can be done -- to locate you within that 100-yard radius as long as your cell phone is turned on. This information is supposed to be accessed only if you dial 911.

    The selling of location-based services will be the subject of another Wireless World column.

    Could the government or anyone with the genius to figure out how to tap into that information also learn your location? You bet they could.

    Larsen adds, however, that under CALEA, a law enforcement agency requesting cooperation from a wireless network provider in locating certain people can access that information only by obtaining a court order.

    "That court order has a strict legal requirement, like [requesting] a tap or a trace," Larsen said. "A judge has to give permission."

    So I called Michael Gross, an attorney I know, and asked how hard it is to get permission to tap a phone. Michael has been practicing criminal law for 35 years in River Edge, N.J.

    Michael told me that permission to tap differs from state to state. But the general requirement is that the highest-level criminal court judge in each county is selected to hear applications made by police officials using sworn affidavits, supported by live testimony. The affidavit states that a crime is being or has been committed and that evidence of person or persons involved in committing that crime can best be obtained by using a wiretap.

    Permission is typically given for limited amounts of time, usually on a 30-day basis with the time extended under certain circumstances. Interestingly enough, by law, the person being tapped must be notified, usually within 90 days after the tap, that a tap was placed on the phone.

    I asked Gross if approvals vary from judge to judge when taps are requested. "These days I believe this stuff is getting easier," he said. "The judges appointed in recent years have a tendency to assume and rely upon an assumption that the government wouldn't be asking if they weren't entitled. They don't put the applicant through as a severe a test for proof as they used to."

    I am aware of the argument that says if you've done nothing wrong, then you have nothing to fear. But I'm afraid world history is not very reassuring on that score.

    This is a huge topic that has many facets, both pro and con, but unfortunately I've used up my allotted space. Stay tuned for Part 2, coming next week.

    If you have anything to contribute about this issue I would like to hear from you. Send an e-mail to ephraim_schwartz@infoworld.com.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •