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  1. #1
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    Bodybuilders using GHB?? oh no!!

    by Jason Meuller--Anabolic Extreme

    GHB- Iíve tried to dispel many of the myths surrounding GHB in past article in Anabolic Extreme, so I wonít go into detail here. Bottom line, GHB is not the killer drug itís made out to be in the media. In fact, I would go so far as to say itís impossible to die from an overdose of GHB. That flies directly in the face of what the media will report, but in almost every case of death thatís been attributed to GHB, the individual involved was using at least one drug in conjunction with the G. Yes, combining alcohol and other depressants with GHB can result in severe consequences, including death. But on its own, GHB is remarkably safe, even at incredibly high doses.

    Ok, so what does GHB do for bodybuilding? Again, reading the literature on GHB would have you believe that itís the best GH releaser available. And realistically, it probably is, a very famous Japanese study showed a nine-fold and sixteen-fold increase in GH levels 30 and 60 minutes respectively after administration of 2.5 grams of GHB in six healthy males between the ages of 25-40. GH levels were still elevated over 7 times over baseline after 120 minutes. Although it should be noted that the 2.5 grams of GHB was administered intravenously in this study, one would expect that oral administration would produce similar effects.

    So, one would think that GHB would build muscle like nobodyís business, right? Unfortunately, real world use of GHB doesnít bear out the results one would expect from reading the studies done with GHB and growth hormone release. Iíve seen dozens of bodybuilders use GHB for extended periods of time with no appreciable muscle gain, and talked to hundreds more who confirm my first-hand observations. Further investigation into the effects of GHB reveal that while it does raise GH significantly, it also raises prolactin levels as well. Since prolactin will serve to counter many of the beneficial effects of GH, it becomes readily apparent why GHB is not a magical muscle-growing, fat-loss drug as itís been touted in the bodybuilding literature.

    So, what does GHB do for bodybuilders? Realistically, it does one thing, which is help you sleep. Iím sure all of you that have used significant amount of testosterone and other steroids can attest to the insomnia these drugs will induce. And the drugs that are used to increase fat loss while dieting, DNP , clenbuterol , and ephedrine and its related compounds will all make normal sleeping very difficult. And since sleep is a vital component to bodybuilding success, GHB can be a very effective tool for bodybuilders that are suffering from insomnia.

    It should be noted that GHB will induce deep sleep for only a few hours at a time before it begins to wear off and the person is awakened from the sudden flood of stored up dopamine. In order to get the best results from GHB, itís often necessary to take another 3 g dose about 3-4 hours after the first in order to get a good 6-8 of quality sleep. For this reason, many GHB users will keep a dose next to their bed and take it immediately after they begin to wake up from the first dose.

    It should also be noted that GHB can be incredibly addicting, and can cause both psychological and physiological addiction. While this information on physiological addiction is the exact opposite of what Iíve printed in the past, Iíve seen first hand experience of physical withdrawals caused by GHB, and these withdrawals have now been documented in scientific literature. Typical withdrawal symptoms after long-term GHB use will include severe agitation, mental status changes, elevated blood pressure, and tachycardia. Treatment for withdrawals will include the use of high doses of benzodiazepines for several days following cessation of GHB us

  2. #2
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    Mr. Contraversy...LOL...

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    Methamphetamine- Itís recently become very en vogue for bodybuilders and fitness competitors to use methamphetamine in order to cut up for a show. Thatís because meth seems to be the perfect dieting drug, one that not only gives you an overall sense of well-being, but raises metabolic rate and decreases appetite as well. And meth does do all three of these things very effectively. However, it also does a lot more, and in my opinion, is the worst recreational drug out there.

    Much like GHB, methamphetamine works to increase a personís sense of well being by affecting dopamine levels in the brain. However, when coming off meth, dopamine production is severely curtailed, resulting in a severe chemical imbalance. Users crave more of the drug to return to feeling normal. This is one of the reasons why meth is so extremely addictive. It also increases metabolic rate by acting as a very powerful CNS stimulant and by raising body temperature. This also results in insomnia (meth users are often awake for days at time), nervousness, tremors, irritability, paranoia, anxiety, and aggression.

    Realistically, meth would be a great drug for contest prep if it werenít so addictive. No physique competitor uses meth thinking that they are going to become severely addicted. However, more often than not, thatís exactly what happens. Methís addictive qualities are so strong that even those without any predisposition to addictive behavior find themselves becoming hooked simply to avoid the horrible comedown. I have to recommend that you stay away from meth, lest you find yourself becoming one of these addicts.

    By Jason Meuller--Anabolic Extreme

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    Quote Originally Posted by Da Bull
    Mr. Contraversy...LOL...
    Yea, I like to call myself the King of Controversy. Thats what makes these forums fun i think.

  5. #5
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    gettin loaded and going G...you are quite the roll model.

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    Paingain is offline Banned
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    GHB is not something I would recommend to anybody. This is some dangerous **** and in higher dosages it most certainly can kill you. This stuff will raise your body temp unlike any other and if your body gets too hot you can die. Take it from somebody who had a bad experience with it. Go get some Ambien if you have trouble sleeping.

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    Im not sayin its good. But i had some reall doubters that anyone used it. And heres my proof that its pretty common.

  8. #8
    Paingain is offline Banned
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    dude, I dont know what your talking about, GHB can put you into a coma or give you a seizure if you take too much.

  9. #9
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    Volume 3, Number 27 August 18, 2000

    Prevention Works!

    Club Drugs: GHB, an Anabolic Steroid

    Anabolic steroids , one type of club drugs being used by young people, are gaining in popularity because of their euphoric, sedative, and bodybuilding effects. Despite research that has shown a decrease in most drug useóincluding crack cocaine, crystal methamphetamine, and cigarette smokingóthe 1999 Monitoring the Future survey found a significant increase in the use of anabolic steroids among 8th and 10th graders, primarily boys (NIDA, Monitoring the Future, 1999.)

    Anabolic steroids are synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone , which promotes skeletal muscle growth. The most popular anabolic steroid among young people is GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate). GHB used to be widely available for medical purposes. The illicit use of GHB rose to such levels that the 106th Congress called the drug ďan imminent hazard to the public safety.Ē Congress amended the Controlled Substances Act in January 2000 to a national awareness campaign, led by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the attorney general, targeting GHBís use and effects. (NCADI, accessed 7/12/2000.)

    What Is GHB?

    GHB is a central nervous system depressant once used by many bodybuilders and athletes. In the 1980s, GHB was widely available over the counter in health food stores, and bodybuilders used it to lose fat and build muscle. GHB has been given nicknames such as Grievous Bodily Harm, G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Georgia Home Boy.

    In 1990, the Food and Drug Administration banned the use of GHB except under the supervision of a physician because of reports of severe side effects, including euphoric and sedative effects similar to the effects experienced after taking Rohypnol (the ďdate rapeĒ drug.) GHB also has been associated with sexual assaults in cities throughout the United States (NIDA, Infofax.) Despite the ban on use, GHB is created in clandestine laboratories, in a variety of forms, including clear liquid, white powder and tablet. Increasing use rates are being reported. In 1998, the Denver Poison Control Center received 33 calls involving GHB, and almost half of these cases were considered life-threatening. (NIDA Infofax-Club Drugs, 2000.) Because it clears from the body relatively quickly, it is often difficult to detect when patients go to emergency rooms and other treatment facilities.

    What Are the Side Effects of GHB?

    Like most steroids, GHB can cause high blood pressure, wide mood swings, liver tumors, and violent behavior. The drugís effects typically last up to 4 hours, depending on the dosage. At lower doses, it can relieve anxiety and promote relaxation; at higher doses, the sedative effects may result in sleep, coma, or death. Other side effects include sweating, headache, decreased heart rate, nausea, vomiting, impaired breathing, loss of reflexes, and tremors.

    For more information about GHB and other club drugs, contact SAMHSAís National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information at http://ncadi.samhsa.gov.

    Sources

    National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI): Date-Rape Drug Prohibition Act of 2000, http://ncadi.samhsa.gov/pubs/Party/daterape.aspx, accessed July 2000.

    National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Club Drugs Home. www.clubdrugs.org, accessed July 2000.

    NIDA, Community Epidemiology Work Group Proceedings, June 1999.

    NIDA, NIDA Notes, vol. 15, no. 1, July 2000.

    NIDA, Infofax-Rohypnol and GHB, http://www.nida.nih.gov/Infofax/RohypnolGHB.aspx, accessed July 2000.

    NIDA, Monitoring the Future Survey, 1999.

    NIDA, Club Drugs Take Center Stage in New National Education and Prevention Initiative by NIDA and National Partners: Initiative Includes Research Funding and Community Outreach, http://ncadi.samhsa.gov/pressreul/dec99/5.aspx, accessed July 2000.

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    Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate

    By: Par Deus

    Background

    During the 80's, Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), which was readily available over-the-counter in nutrition stores, enjoyed widespread popularity among bodybuilders for its ability to stimulate growth hormone release (as well as its euphoric properties). It was subsequently pulled from the market due to a few isolated instances of abuse (all of which also involved other drugs) and, it is thought by some, to protect prescription pharmaceutical sleep-aids from safer, more effective (and less expensive) competition and to pave the way for the wave of SSRI's that started with Prozac.

    Not coincidentally, since it sale became illegal in 1990, its popularity has spread considerably.
    Introduction

    GHB is a four carbon, fatty acid derivative originally synthesized in the early 1960's by Dr. Henry Laborit , who was looking for an analogue of GABA (the brain's primary inhibitory neurotransmitter) that would readily cross the blood brain barrier -- a property GABA lacked (1). Indeed, GHB did prove to easily cross the blood brain barrier -- However, it was found to exert of number of effects not shared by GABA (2). It is now known that it does not bind to either GABA receptor under readily achievable concentrations (3). And though it is formed from GABA in brain tissues, that is not its only or perhaps even primary source (3).

    A decade after its synthesis, GHB was shown to occur naturally in the human brain (4). Twenty-five years later, specific receptors for GHB were discovered (5), and it is now thought by many to be a neurotransmitter, or at least a neuromodulator (6, 7).

    GHB is also found in various peripheral tissues such as kidney, heart, skeletal muscles, and brown fat (8) -- at higher concentrations that in the brain -- but as of yet, no peripheral receptors have been discovered, thus is function in these tissues not known at this time (9, 10).
    Biochemistry

    As mentioned, GHB is a naturally occurring component of mammalian brain metabolism. Highest brain levels occur in the substantia nigra, thalamus, and hypothalamus, lowest levels are found in the cerebellum and frontal cortex (11). It can be formed from GABA in the brain as well as being metabolized from it -- both via the intermediate succinic semialdehyde (12), which can also enter the Krebs cycle as succinate. The recently banned supplement ingredients, gammabutyrolactone and 1,4 butanediol, are also naturally occurring precursors (13).
    Pharmocokinetics

    GHB is readily bioavailable with oral administration, however, oral clearance rate and % absorption decrease and half-life increases with escalating doses, indicating that these processes are capacity limited (14, 15). This does not appear to be true for GBL (15), which explains the differing subjective effects between the two.
    Pharmacology

    Following oral, intravenous, or intraperitoneal administration, GHB produces CNS depressant effects similar to alcohol -- and, in fact, it has been shown to substitute for alcohol in physically dependent rats (16). At doses as low as .1 mg/kg in humans, it produces a state of sedation indistinguishable from human sleep (17). The mechanism behind its subjective effects are not completely understood, and involve multiple neurotransmitter systems:
    Dopamine

    The central neurotransmitter dopamine has been consistently shown to be altered by GHB, and is considered as the primary mediator of its subjective effects. At low doses, it causes a reduction in dopaminergic activity, due to inhibition of dopamine releasing neurons -- which possess GHB receptors (11). This combined with GHB stimulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (18) -- the enzyme which converts the amino acid tyrosine to dopamine -- causes a buildup of dopamine, which, when finally released when the drug has worn off, is quite likely responsible for the refreshed, hyper-alert state one experiences upon waking from a GHB induced sleep.

    There is animal data showing an INCREASED release of dopamine at high doses (19, 20). These are intravenous doses in the 400-700mg/kg range, which would around 50 grams for a 200 lb man. Rats metabolize GHB much faster than humans (21), but a conservative estimate would still put an equivalent dose at 15g or so (though I don't know if equivalent blood levels are even possible orally due to the afore mentioned transport saturation).

    In the real world, reports of the subjective experience of doses this high are that it causes rapid onset of sleep -- which does not agree with the effects typically seen from increased dopamine release. As GHB has been found to effect several other systems, perhaps one of them is overriding the stimulant effect that would be expected to occur.

    GHB has also been shown to increase mRNA for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 (22).
    Serotonin

    It is not known whether GHB influence serotonergic systems directly, or indirectly via dopamine or GABA, but it is known that pharmacological doses cause an increase in serotonin turnover, due to increased uptake of tryptophan (23). This action on serotonin probably at least partially accounts for its ability to stimulate growth hormone release, as co-administration with the serotonin receptor antagonist, metergoline, significantly reduced this increase (23). Metergoline has also been shown to lower GH levels in acromegaly patients (24). It seems quite possible that this system is involved in the sedating and antidepressant effects observed with GHB treatment.
    Opioid

    GHB has been found to increase brain levels of the endogenous opiods, dynorphin and beta-endorphin (25). The opiod receptor antagonist, nalaxone, significantly reduces the metabolic and pharmacological effects of GHB (including dopaminergic) -- leading some to suggest that the opiod system modulates its activity on dopamine (26). In addition, GHB induced EEG changes are mimicked by administration of morphine and beta-endorphin (26). As with serotonin, GHB induced sedating and antidepressant/euphoric effects could be be mediated by the opiod system.
    GABA

    Since its creation as a hopeful GABA analogue, it has been a common misconception that GHB exerts much of its action through binding with GABA receptors -- however its affinity is 1/1000th that of GABA, thus binding does not occur under physiological conditions (27). Nonetheless, GHB's effects are thought to be mediated, to some extent, by the GABAergic system. First, GHB is both a precursor to, and metabolite of, GABA. In addition, GHB receptors are found on GABAergic neurons, suggesting that it modulates it release (28). As GABA is the brain's primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, it is quite likely that the sedating properties of GHB are mediated by this system.
    Benzodiazepine

    Benzodiazepine action is mediated through the GABA(A) receptor (29), and since GHB metabolizes to GABA and also stimulates its release, it would be expected to activate this system. And, indeed, the anxiolytic effects of low dose GHB is antagonized by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (29). Flumazenil also blunts the growth hormone response of GHB (30). Again, this system could be involved in the sedative/anxiolytic/antidepressant effects of GHB.


    Acetylcholine

    GHB has no effect on acetylcholine, though its precursor, gammabutyrolactone, has been shown to increase brain levels at high doses, suggesting that some amounts may escape hydrolysis and enter the CNS (31).
    Norepinephrine

    The majority of the literature suggests GHB has no effect on central norepinephrine levels, however Persson found increases in synthesis and utilization (32).


    GHB and Bodybuilding

    Direct Effects

    Does GHB truly have a place in a bodybuilder's arsenal, or is the whole GH thing just an excuse to get twisted?? I believe it does have a place -- though, as I will show, many of its positive effects on body composition are more indirect than direct.

    The first thing we should look at is its most commonly touted effect -- its stimulation of Growth Hormone release. It has, in fact, been found to raise growth hormone levels sharply in numerous studies (23, 30, 33). Some have claimed that these increases are only with intravenous administration or are the indirect result of GHB inducing sleep, as the onset of slow wave sleep is associated with increased GH levels. However, studies using oral delivery, have indeed shown increases in conscious subjects (23,30). With administration of 1.5 g of GHB, GH levels begin to rise almost immediately, reaching a peak of 3 times normal levels within 45 minutes, then rapidly falling back to within 25% of baseline by the 90 minute mark. Clearly, it does increase growth hormone.

    Nonetheless, reports in both the literature and the real world on body composition, even with growth hormone injections, have been something less than spectacular. In the literature, GH has been shown to increase protein synthesis, however, it is not contractile protein (muscle) but rather visceral (organs) (34). Data on fat loss and muscle sparing with GH is a bit better. It has been shown to inhibit protein breakdown during dieting and fasting, leading to increased retention of muscle mass (35) . It is also known to be lipolytic (36). Real world reports of GH run along the same lines -- it not effective on its own for increasing muscle, but an increase it fat loss is definitely noticeable. But, again, this is with injections. Once a day use of GHB is not likely to mirror these effects. However, if someone would like to take 1.5 grams every 90 minutes for an extended period, please report back with your results.

    At doses of 2.5 - 3.5 grams, GHB causes increased release of prolactin, doubling levels by the 45 minute mark, followed by a gradual return to baseline (33). Increases in prolactin have been shown to proportionally raise leptin levels, so this represents a possible positive effect on fat loss and muscle retention (37). Unfortunately, similar doses also raise cortisol levels, which has exactly the opposite effect of leptin on body composition (33). This antagonism might account for the lack of effects observed with GHB, and could perhaps be remedied with a drugs or supplement such as Cytadren or phosphatidylserine.

    In addition to these, there are several other lesser known effects of GHB which have implications for bodybuilders. It increases gastric emptying (38), which is likely what causes the temporary increase in appetite observed with GHB use . Obviously, this is not particularly beneficial on a diet, though it might be on a mass phase. It also would likely make a good addition to a post-workout drink, as it would make glucose and amino acids available more quickly. Increased protein synthesis in brain and gastric tissues has been reported, whether this is accompanied by increased skeletal muscle synthesis is not known (39). Obese rats were found to have lower brain levels of GHB than their lean counterparts, despite identical diet, which suggests GHB as a potential signaler in the regulation of bodyweight (40) -- GHB metabolite GABA increases with fat feeding, which lends further support to this hypothesis. It has been shown to function as a powerful an antioxidant, blocking free-radical formation and lipid peroxidation (10). This could aid in recovery, as well as in overall health.

    One of the more fascinating possibilities, comes from a study in rats (21) which showed a remarkable increase in body temperature after administration of very low doses. Following intraperitoneal injection of 5mg/kg, body temperature rose rapidly to 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit above normal at 15 minutes, and reached a peak of almost 2.2 degrees at the hour mark. It was still elevated by 2 degrees at the 75 minute mark, and dropping only quite gradually -- in humans, this would be a profound thermogenic effect (Clenbuterol might raise body temperature by 1 degree).

    Considering GHB has a half-life of 5 minutes after injection (41), it would seem that GHB was not directly mediating these effects, but rather caused the release of something with a longer half-life. I am going to go out on a limb a bit and propose that the mediator might be norepinephrine -- which has a peripheral half-life of several hours -- as long as 12 in some tissues (42 ).

    As mentioned above, GHB does not seem to effect central norepinephrine levels, however it HAS been shown to effect peripheral levels -- with high doses causing profound depletion of heart and brown fat norepinephrine levels (10). And, perhaps not coincidentally, in contrast to the increase in body temperature with the low dose, these high doses consistently cause a DECREASE in body temperature (21, 43). As we have seen, GHB has been conclusively shown to exert a biphasic effect on dopamine, so the possibility certainly exists with this compound.

    I want to make clear that the above is very speculative, both as to why it occurred and to its having any relevancy toward humans. First, it is only one study. Second, it used intraperitoneal injections rather than oral administration. Third, the mechanisms were not looked at. And fourth, rats have much higher levels of brown fat, thus the thermogenic effects of an increase in norepinephrine would be exaggerated compared to humans.

    Nonetheless, it is certainly enticing enough to give a try, with a couple of adjustments that take into account the use of human subjects (I would not expect the pharmacokinetics of oral and i.p. administration to be significantly different with this low of doses). GHB is metabolized by rats much faster than humans, thus a lower dose would be recommended. I would estimate 1-2mg/kg at most -- meaning around 100-200 mg for a 200 lb person -- this is a tiny dose -- one which would produce no subjective psychological effects and, in fact, probably no increase in brain GHB levels (21).
    Indirect Effects

    Perhaps the most important applications of GHB for bodybuilders do not involve direct effects on hormones or hormone systems, anabolic or otherwise. The first is that GHB is a MAGNIFICENT sleep aid. As mentioned previously, at sufficient doses, it rapidly and predictably causes the onset of a sedation which has been characterized as identical to human sleep (17), but with a greater portion of the time spent in stage IV and R.E.M. sleep (44), which are the most beneficial for recovery. I trust I do not need to mention the importance of sleep for a bodybuilder. I trust I also do not need to mention the detrimental effect on sleep of certain common components of the bodybuilding arsenal such as EC and androgens. I will mention that GHB makes waking up in the middle of the night for a protein shake much more feasible. And, again, I trust that I do not have to mention the effects of a 6-10 hour fast on the anabolic/catabolic state of the body.

    The other application for GHB is as an alcohol substitute. In addition to containing 105 calories per drink -- more if you are having beer, alcohol lowers testosterone (45) and has a tendency to cause less than optimal workouts the following day. As dedicated as we might be to improving our bodies, most of us do not want to be a slave to this pursuit when it comes to socializing/partying.

    GHB is a life saver here. Its biochemical, electrophysiological, and and pharmacological effects are quite similar to alcohol (46, 47). And, in fact, it has been successfully used clinically in the treatment of alcohol dependency, where it is thought to work through a substitution mechanism -- meaning it mimics alcohol's actions on the central nervous system (46). Both activate the dopamine system -- a characteristic commonly shared by drugs of abuse, they exhibit cross-tolerance -- meaning frequent consumption of one causes tolerance to the other, and both are preferentially (vs. water) self-administered by rats (16).

    Subjectively, the effects are not identical. Some prefer a GHB intoxication to alcohol, some the vice versa. I find GHB to be more sedating and slightly less uninhibiting than alcohol, but I know others for whom the opposite is true. Without question, one feels considerably better the next day with GHB vs. alcohol.

    A combination of the two can allow a a ****faced intoxication subjectively quite similar to that produced by alcohol, but with the consumption of only a few drinks, thus only a few hundred calories. It is typically strongly suggested that the two not be combined, with the argument that they have synergistic effects. However, based both on experience and the available scientific data, I tend to think the effects are mostly additive. Thus, I do not necessarily consider this activity contraindicated. The problem is that downing a "cap full" of GHB is like bonging a 6 pack, so for someone who is already quite intoxicated, this can put them over the edge.

    Also, keep in mind that the metabolism of the two drugs are different -- GHB's in not saturable at typically utilized doses, thus it has a half-life (of probably 1 hr when taken orally), while alcohol's is quite saturable, thus only one drink is metabolized per hour -- meaning if one has 6g of GHB and 6 drinks at hour one (do not do this), at hour three, you would have only 1.5g of GHB in your system, but 4 drinks. As you can see, if one kept drinking, as the night went on, it would get a bit complicated, so if you do experiment with this combination, start with small amounts until you get a feel for it.
    Safety

    The overall safety of GHB is well-established in experimental and clinical use. Doses as high as 30 grams a day have been used in humans (48). And acute doses of as much as 1g/kg have been used in monkeys (10). Both without ill effects. It has no toxic effects on the liver, kidneys or other organs (48, 49). In narcolepsy studies, nightly use of 2.5 to 15 grams for several years resulted in no long-term adverse effects, nor did it result in addiction/dependence.

    Side effects can include dizziness, nausea, and sometimes vomiting -- particularly on an empty stomach. It almost invariably causes drowsiness, so don't take it and then hop in the bathtub. Ataxia (loss of coordination) is more severe than with alcohol, so driving could be considered contraindicated.
    Maximizing Recreational Value

    With our new understanding of GHB pharmacology, coupled with a basic understanding of the mechanisms of other drugs, it is apparent that we could readily manipulate our subjective experience to suit our tastes. However, an in-depth analysis is beyond the scope of this article -- though, it will likely be the subject of a future one.
    Availability

    Scandalously, sale or possession of GHB is now illegal in all 50 states. It is currently a "Schedule I" drug -- meaning it has no legitimate medical uses, despite over thirty years of use in Europe in everything from drug addiction treatment to childbirth.

    Both gammabutyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4 butanediol (BDO) are converted into GHB upon ingestion (both are naturally occurring precursors in the human brain), and were being sold as nutritional supplements for a while (RenewTrient, SomatoPro, Blue Nitro, etc.). However, their sale for human use has now been banned as well.

    GHB can be readily synthesized from GBL, however, it has been designated as a "List 1" chemical, meaning a distributor must obtain a DEA # and report all sales, along with appropriate paperwork. Thus, it is, for all intents and purposes, unavailable as well.

    If none of these can be readily obtained, what is the point of all this...???
    The Good News

    I have recently discovered a substance which, upon ingestion, is converted via lactonase catalysed hydrolysis (same mechanism as GBL) to a GHB analogue that was found to bind to the receptor with 15% GREATER affinity GHB itself. And, not only is it perfectly legal in all 50 states for sale, possession, and ingestion, but it also is Generally Regarded as Safe (G.R.A.S) by the FDA.

    This product, Tranquili-G, is now available through Avant Labs. I am taking steps, as we speak, to obtain a use patent on it as a sleep aid, growth hormone releaser, anxiolytic, and good-time party drink. Until that time, I will be unable to reveal the actual name of the chemical, for obvious reasons.

    [Tranquili-G is available now at Bodybuilding.com, click here!]



    Questions and comments on this article can be sent to ParDeus@avantlabs.com

    Be Sure To Check Out Other Chemically Correct Articles:

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  11. #11
    Paingain is offline Banned
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    I dont know why this guy has even come to this board. Ok, you posted a link to an article, an article which states at higher dosages the user can experience coma and death. Your contradicting yourself here buddy. I'm sick of these guys thinking that because they can cut and paste a fu*kin' article that they know thier stuff.

  12. #12
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    how am i contradicting myself? i never said this was good or that i use it. i simply said many people do use it.

  13. #13
    Paingain is offline Banned
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    By the way, very informative, they were conducting studies in lab rats and monkeys. Why not humans if the stuff is supposedly a safe drug huh?

  14. #14
    Paingain is offline Banned
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    well, "bodybuilders using GHb? Oh no!!!" that sounds pretty sarcastic for an article title. Dude, I'm not trying to flame here, but take it from somebody who knows a kid that is in a wheel chair forever because he messed with G.

  15. #15
    MBaraso's Avatar
    MBaraso is offline Retired Mod
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    We don't discuss rec drugs here, and as far as I'm concerned GHB is one of them.
    Locked.

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