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  1. #1
    cj1capp's Avatar
    cj1capp is offline Anabolic Member
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    Exclamation flax /cotton /grape seed oil

    I would lik some expericened oppions on wich oil is the best to use a transport media I.E for injection of tren /test/ EQ. the oils I know of are flax cotton and grape seed oil . Thanks for the help

  2. #2
    Pale Horse's Avatar
    Pale Horse is offline F.I.L.F.
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    grapeseed anyone who says something different gets a biatch slap!

  3. #3
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    Wow 1Victor... Luckily I just switched to grapeseed from sesame... Cuz I sure dont like being slapped around... unless you have d cups and blonde hair....

    I've also considered using tea oil... available at most high end health food stores... Whole Foods, et al..

    L8

  4. #4
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    interesting, there are actually real health bebefits to grape seed and it is thinner and easier to filter, me luv it!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1victor
    grapeseed anyone who says something different gets a biatch slap!
    thanks for the info its grape sedd for me then.

  6. #6
    ChrisB's Avatar
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    My very best creations have been born with grapeseed oil as the father.

  7. #7
    cj1capp's Avatar
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    this is not my research and i want to give credit to the person who did he is from a different board and i hope its ok I share his research with AR. So thank you Carlito

    GRAPESEED OIL IS HEART-FRIENDLY
    Using grapeseed oil in your cooking provides two key nutrients in your diet: vitamin E and linoleic acid. Grapeseed oil has a high concentration (60-120 mg per 100 g of oil) of the antioxidant vitamin E. It is also a highly concentrated source (76%) of linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid (EFA) also know as omega-6 acid, so it must be acquired through the diet. It is needed for the production of prostaglandins, hormone-like substances in the body involved in reducing platelets aggregation (blood clotting) and inflammation.

    Furthermore, grapeseed oil is naturally cholesterol-free. Lowering your intake of saturated fats can help reduce your risk of developing heart and circulatory problems.

    A diet high in saturated fats can increase cholesterol levels in the blood, leading to hardening of the arteries and other health problems. Among cooking oils, grapeseed oil has one of the lowest levels of saturated fat - only 9%. Substituting grapeseed oil for your usual cooking or salad oil is an easy way of lowering the amount of saturated fats in your diet.

    Research has shown that "The use of grapeseed oil in a daily diet appears to improve both HDL and LDL levels in weight-stable subjects with initially low HDL levels," concluded David T. Nash, MD, the lead researcher on the study.

    Another study by the same team reconfirmed the beneficial effect of grapeseed oil on cholesterol levels (Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 1993) Fifty-six men and women with initially low HDL levels were instructed to substitute up to 1.5 ounces of grapeseed oil for the oil they normally used for cooking and salads. Blood tests were taken at the beginning of the study and after three weeks. At the end of the test period, the subjects showed no significant changes in weight or total cholesterol levels, but the ratio of LDL to HDL had changed.

    There was a 7% reduction in LDL ("bad") and a 13% increase in HDL ("good") cholesterol levels. The ability of grapeseed oil to raise HDLs "appears unique," says Dr. Nash. "Until now, no foods and only a few drugs have demonstrated an ability to raise HDL cholesterol."

    The long-term effect of elevated HDL and lowered LDL levels on cardiovascular health was shown in the Helsinki Heart Study, which assessed thousands of volunteers for their risk of heart disease based on cholesterol levels. The study followed 4,081 men, between the ages of 40 and 55 years old, over a five-year period. Cholesterol levels were artificially altered (LDL level lowered, HDL level raised) using a drug called gemfibrozil. Every three months, the subjects were examined and tested for signs of heart disease.

    The results showed that LDL/HDL levels in the blood are an important indicator of health. Over the five year period of the study, there were 34% fewer incidents of heart disease in the treated group (those with lowered LDL and raised HDL levels) compared to the placebo group, and also fewer deaths (14 vs. 19). During the fifth year of the study, the treated group had 65% fewer heart attacks than the placebo group.

    A low level of HDL (and corresponding higher level of LDL) is a major indicator for the development of heart problems, even more than overall cholesterol levels, according to the study. The increase in the concentration of serum HDL cholesterol and the decrease in that of LDL cholesterol were both associated with reduced risk, whereas the changes in the amounts of total cholesterol and triglycerides in the serum were not, stated the researchers. "The risk of coronary heart disease increased with decreasing the concentration of HDL."

    The study showed that even small increases in HDL can have a significant impact in lowering your changes of developing heart disease. For each single percentage point increase in the level of HDL, there was a corresponding 3% to 4% decrease in the incidence of heart disease.

    In other words, increasing your level of HDLs by 10% to 13 % with grapeseed oil can reduce your risk for cardiovascular problems by 30% to 52%. These studies demonstrated that the health benefits begin after a surprisingly short period of time. Continued use of grapeseed oil could lead to even better results.

    GRAPESEED OIL CAN HELP PREVENT IMPOTENCE
    Low HDL levels are also a significant risk factor for impotence. A 1994 study (Journal of Urology) of 1,290 men, 40 to 70 years old, found several factors which contributed to a higher probability of impotence. Age was the predominant factor, as the prevalence of complete impotence tripled from 5% to 15% between ages 40 and 70. After adjusting for age, the other main factors were heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, personality type, and HDL level.

    "The probability of impotence varied inversely with high density lipoprotein cholesterol," stated the researchers. For the younger men in the study (from 40 to 55 years old), the likelihood of developing moderate impotence almost quadrupled from 6.7% to 25 % as their HDL levels decreased from 90 mg to 30 mg (per deciliter of blood). For the older men in the study (from 56 to 70 years old), the probability of complete impotence increased from near zero to 16% as their HDL levels correspondingly decreased.

    While the effectiveness of grapeseed oil in reducing impotence has not (to our knowledge) been specifically tested, the fact that it can increase HDLs while decreasing LDLs and triglycerides suggests it could be of considerable benefits in preventing and reversing this condition.

    Enjoy!

    Carlito

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cj1capp
    this is not my research and i want to give credit to the person who did he is from a different board and i hope its ok I share his research with AR. So thank you Carlito

    GRAPESEED OIL IS HEART-FRIENDLY
    Using grapeseed oil in your cooking provides two key nutrients in your diet: vitamin E and linoleic acid. Grapeseed oil has a high concentration (60-120 mg per 100 g of oil) of the antioxidant vitamin E. It is also a highly concentrated source (76%) of linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid (EFA) also know as omega-6 acid, so it must be acquired through the diet. It is needed for the production of prostaglandins, hormone-like substances in the body involved in reducing platelets aggregation (blood clotting) and inflammation.

    Furthermore, grapeseed oil is naturally cholesterol-free. Lowering your intake of saturated fats can help reduce your risk of developing heart and circulatory problems.

    A diet high in saturated fats can increase cholesterol levels in the blood, leading to hardening of the arteries and other health problems. Among cooking oils, grapeseed oil has one of the lowest levels of saturated fat - only 9%. Substituting grapeseed oil for your usual cooking or salad oil is an easy way of lowering the amount of saturated fats in your diet.

    Research has shown that "The use of grapeseed oil in a daily diet appears to improve both HDL and LDL levels in weight-stable subjects with initially low HDL levels," concluded David T. Nash, MD, the lead researcher on the study.

    Another study by the same team reconfirmed the beneficial effect of grapeseed oil on cholesterol levels (Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 1993) Fifty-six men and women with initially low HDL levels were instructed to substitute up to 1.5 ounces of grapeseed oil for the oil they normally used for cooking and salads. Blood tests were taken at the beginning of the study and after three weeks. At the end of the test period, the subjects showed no significant changes in weight or total cholesterol levels, but the ratio of LDL to HDL had changed.

    There was a 7% reduction in LDL ("bad") and a 13% increase in HDL ("good") cholesterol levels. The ability of grapeseed oil to raise HDLs "appears unique," says Dr. Nash. "Until now, no foods and only a few drugs have demonstrated an ability to raise HDL cholesterol."

    The long-term effect of elevated HDL and lowered LDL levels on cardiovascular health was shown in the Helsinki Heart Study, which assessed thousands of volunteers for their risk of heart disease based on cholesterol levels. The study followed 4,081 men, between the ages of 40 and 55 years old, over a five-year period. Cholesterol levels were artificially altered (LDL level lowered, HDL level raised) using a drug called gemfibrozil. Every three months, the subjects were examined and tested for signs of heart disease.

    The results showed that LDL/HDL levels in the blood are an important indicator of health. Over the five year period of the study, there were 34% fewer incidents of heart disease in the treated group (those with lowered LDL and raised HDL levels) compared to the placebo group, and also fewer deaths (14 vs. 19). During the fifth year of the study, the treated group had 65% fewer heart attacks than the placebo group.

    A low level of HDL (and corresponding higher level of LDL) is a major indicator for the development of heart problems, even more than overall cholesterol levels, according to the study. The increase in the concentration of serum HDL cholesterol and the decrease in that of LDL cholesterol were both associated with reduced risk, whereas the changes in the amounts of total cholesterol and triglycerides in the serum were not, stated the researchers. "The risk of coronary heart disease increased with decreasing the concentration of HDL."

    The study showed that even small increases in HDL can have a significant impact in lowering your changes of developing heart disease. For each single percentage point increase in the level of HDL, there was a corresponding 3% to 4% decrease in the incidence of heart disease.

    In other words, increasing your level of HDLs by 10% to 13 % with grapeseed oil can reduce your risk for cardiovascular problems by 30% to 52%. These studies demonstrated that the health benefits begin after a surprisingly short period of time. Continued use of grapeseed oil could lead to even better results.

    GRAPESEED OIL CAN HELP PREVENT IMPOTENCE
    Low HDL levels are also a significant risk factor for impotence. A 1994 study (Journal of Urology) of 1,290 men, 40 to 70 years old, found several factors which contributed to a higher probability of impotence. Age was the predominant factor, as the prevalence of complete impotence tripled from 5% to 15% between ages 40 and 70. After adjusting for age, the other main factors were heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, personality type, and HDL level.

    "The probability of impotence varied inversely with high density lipoprotein cholesterol," stated the researchers. For the younger men in the study (from 40 to 55 years old), the likelihood of developing moderate impotence almost quadrupled from 6.7% to 25 % as their HDL levels decreased from 90 mg to 30 mg (per deciliter of blood). For the older men in the study (from 56 to 70 years old), the probability of complete impotence increased from near zero to 16% as their HDL levels correspondingly decreased.

    While the effectiveness of grapeseed oil in reducing impotence has not (to our knowledge) been specifically tested, the fact that it can increase HDLs while decreasing LDLs and triglycerides suggests it could be of considerable benefits in preventing and reversing this condition.

    Enjoy!

    Carlito
    just wanted to bump this bros work

  9. #9
    I-WISH-A-MF-WOULD is offline Associate Member
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    Does anyone have a web address for grapeseed oil?

  10. #10
    cj1capp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by I-WISH-A-MF-WOULD
    Does anyone have a web address for grapeseed oil?
    Safe Way shoping center, as would any supper market.

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