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  1. #1
    sblakersfan is offline Junior Member
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    Smoking on Winny

    Is it bad if Im smoking lots of weed while im on winny?

  2. #2
    CSK
    CSK is offline New Member
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    Those munchies certainly don't help while cutting.

  3. #3
    Defconx3's Avatar
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    Bro, no offense, but if you are putting 17 alpha-alkylated, synthetic hormones in your body don't you think you should take your training a bit more seriously?

  4. #4
    sblakersfan is offline Junior Member
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    When im not high..I have perfect training habits, i eat right and everything i just tend to cheat when im high.

  5. #5
    Ranger5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Defconx3
    Bro, no offense, but if you are putting 17 alpha-alkylated, synthetic hormones in your body don't you think you should take your training a bit more seriously?
    Who are you to decide how seriously someone else is taking their training? For all you know he could smoke half an ounce a day and look twice as good as you. Maybe he uses weed to eat. We all know how hard it is eat 2 or 3 hundred grams of protein a day.
    Anyway, to reply to his question...everybody is different. What works for you might have totally different effects for me. I say smoke up and see what happens. But I'm just an amatuer who lives in a state where marijuana is legal.

  6. #6
    Defconx3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger5
    Who are you to decide how seriously someone else is taking their training? For all you know he could smoke half an ounce a day and look twice as good as you. Maybe he uses weed to eat. We all know how hard it is eat 2 or 3 hundred grams of protein a day.
    Anyway, to reply to his question...everybody is different. What works for you might have totally different effects for me. I say smoke up and see what happens. But I'm just an amatuer who lives in a state where marijuana is legal.
    First of all, I was NEVER saying that he was not taking his training seriously enough, I was putting across the point that one must make PRIORITYS. When a person is using an illegal anabolic steroid in order to bulk or cut up, they probably should be making that a PRIORITY.

    It is well known and well documented that weed lowers testosterone levels and boosts estrogen levels. The primary affect on your training that smoking weed will impact is your diet. Since this particular person is concerned about weed affecting winny, its safe to say that he is on a winny cutting cycle. I do not hear of too many people using winny to bulk.

    Eating enormous amounts of food will not help him cut. I know that if I smoke my judgement on which kinds of food to eat goes out the window. I eat, and eat, and eat even more. While this can be beneficial during a bulking cycle where you are struggling to get those extra few calories, it is enough to completely RUIN a cutting cycle. If he doesn't want to eat right then the winny will not yeild much results, and that makes it pointless to even take the winny in the first place.

    Another thing which is not too often mentioned, is the fact that smoking anything will contribute to the development of osteoporosis, which is brittle bones. Therefore it is arguable that smoking anything has a destructive effect on the body, whether it is an immediate or delayed effect.

    Anyways, the main point I am trying to make here is that one has to set prioritys. I will agree that smoking occassionally will probably do no harm, but in this instance sblakersfan stated "lots of weed". Sometimes you want to get buzzed, and if you are really craving a buzz I would recommend smoking over drinking any day of the week. The best solution for sblakersfan is to ease up on all the smoking. That doesn't mean that he has to quit, it simply means that he should seriously consider smoking less. A little weed here and there will not hurt you.

  7. #7
    IronFreakX's Avatar
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    Do you have any proof of those claims? About the weed i mean??

  8. #8
    Titan1 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronFreakX
    Do you have any proof of those claims? About the weed i mean??
    Didnt you know that are you serious?

  9. #9
    IronFreakX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Titan1
    Didnt you know that are you serious?
    Its been said hundreds of times i know...but ive never seen any proof..Did you???

  10. #10
    IronFreakX's Avatar
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    Proof..

    Effects of chronic marijuana use on testosterone , luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, prolactin and cortisol in men and women.

    Block RI, Farinpour R, Schlechte JA.

    Department of Anesthesia, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City 52242.

    To investigate possible effects of chronic marijuana use on reproductive and stress hormones, we assayed testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, prolactin, and cortisol in 93 men and 56 women with a mean (+/- S.E.) age of 23.5 +/- 0.4 years. Hormone values were compared among groups of subjects stratified according to frequency of marijuana use (frequent, moderate and infrequent; N = 27, 18, and 30, respectively) and non-using controls (N = 74). Chronic marijuana use showed no significant effect on hormone concentrations in either men or women.
    PMID: 1935564 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  11. #11
    8-MAN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger5
    Who are you to decide how seriously someone else is taking their training? For all you know he could smoke half an ounce a day and look twice as good as you. Maybe he uses weed to eat. We all know how hard it is eat 2 or 3 hundred grams of protein a day.
    Anyway, to reply to his question...everybody is different. What works for you might have totally different effects for me. I say smoke up and see what happens. But I'm just an amatuer who lives in a state where marijuana is legal.
    whoa there hard ass...he said "no offense" to the guy and you are the one who took offense

    i agree with him. steroids are not for casual use to just help you get big without the dedication. that is how they get a bad name. if you are going to invest the time and money into doing a cycle to improve your body, why do anything to hinder it in its most receptive time for growth? jmo

  12. #12
    IronFreakX's Avatar
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    Another one

    Another one

    Physical assessment of 30 chronic cannabis users and 30 matched controls.

    Cruickshank EK.

    Ganja is used extensively in the working-class population of Jamaica, particularly in certain agricultural and fishing communities. Ganja, smoking is illegal but can be accepted as part of the culture in these areas. Sixty male subjects were chosen for assessment, 30 chronic smokers and 30 controls from comparable social, economic, and cultural backgrounds, and were matched for height and age. A chronic smoker had somked a minimum of three spliffs per day for a minimum of 10 years. The subjects were admitted to the hospital for 1 week for psychologic and physical assessment. The physical assessment included a detailed medical history and examination, heart and lung radiography, electrocardiograms, respiratory, liver, and renal function tests, hematology, treponemal serology, and chromosomal studies. No significant physical abnormalities were found, except in two smokers, and there was no reason to suspect that these disabilities were related to ganja. No significant differences between the two groups were demonstrated in the wide range of tests administered.
    PMID: 1071376 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  13. #13
    wascaptain5214 is offline Senior Member
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    first i dont smoke, i have friends who do and my 20yo college student daughter does. also i dont drink, but if i had to choose it would be weed. now the friends i grew up with, that smoked are all fat and losers...the friends i grew up with that drank, are fat and loseres. me i never did either and i am fat and a loser......go figure lol nothing wrong with smoking pot......but do it responsivly

  14. #14
    Squatman51's Avatar
    Squatman51 is offline Senior Member
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    no no smoking is awesome when your on winny

  15. #15
    Defconx3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronFreakX
    Do you have any proof of those claims? About the weed i mean??
    Sure thing.

    Endocrine Effects of Marijuana
    Todd T. Brown, MD, and Adrian S. Dobs, MD, MHS

    In the late 1960s, the dramatic increase in the casual
    use of marijuana raised questions about its potential
    adverse effects on health. In 1972, Harmon and
    Aliapoulios1 provided the first report of marijuana’s
    clinical impact on the endocrine system with the initial
    description of marijuana-associated gynecomastia .
    Further investigation has demonstrated that marijuana
    and its active component, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol
    (THC), have widespread effects on multiple hormonal
    systems, including gonadal, adrenal, prolactin, growth
    hormone, and thyroid hormone regulation in experimental
    models. In addition, the effects on the
    neuroendocrine mechanism of feeding are being delineated.
    Many of these acute effects, however, are transient
    as tolerance likely develops, and the long-term
    impact of marijuana smoking on the endocrine systems
    in humans remains unclear. This review will outline
    the effects of cannabinoids on the various hormonal
    systems both in animals and in man and evaluate the
    evidence of possible clinical consequences on the endocrine
    system with marijuana use.

    HYPOTHALAMICPITUITARY-
    GONADAL AXIS

    In both males and females, the secretion of sex hormones
    is directly controlled by the pituitary and indirectly
    influenced by the hypothalamus. From cells
    in the medial basal hypothalamus, gonadotropinreleasing
    hormone (GnRH) is secreted in a pulsatile
    fashion under the influence of a variety of other factors,
    including endogenous opiates, catecholamines,
    prolactin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and
    neuropeptide Y. GnRH stimulates the production of
    follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing
    hormone (LH) in the anterior pituitary gonadotrophs.
    In both males and females, FSH and LH act on the gonads,
    leading to the secretion of testosterone in males
    and estradiol and progesterone in females. These hormones
    feed back to the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary
    to modulate GnRH and gonadotropin release.
    Marijuana, 9-THC, and other cannabinoids acutely
    alter hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) integrity
    and affect reproductive function by acting at the hypothalamus
    either directly through GnRH or indirectly
    through other modulators (Figure 1). These effects are
    likely mediated by central cannabinoid (CB1) receptors
    in the hypothalamus.2 CB1 receptors have also been
    found in the testes3 and the ovaries4 of experimental
    animals, suggesting a possible direct effect of
    cannabinoids on the gonads. In addition, marijuana
    condensate and 9-THC inhibit binding of dihydrotestosterone
    (DHT) to the androgen receptor,5 and
    noncannabinoid components of marijuana extract
    have been shown to bind to the estrogen receptor.6 The
    extent to which these non-CB1-mediated pathways
    contribute to marijuana’s effects on the HPG axis has
    not been clarified.

    HPG AXIS EFFECTS IN MALES

    LH stimulates the Leydig cells in the testes to produce
    testosterone, while FSH primarily acts on the Sertoli
    cells to regulate spermatogenesis. In the adult human
    male, testosterone has a variety of actions throughout
    the body, including the maintenance of secondary sex
    characteristics, the facilitation of Sertoli cell function,
    and the promotion of sexual function. Hypogonadism
    results in decreased quality of life marked by fatigue,
    decreased libido, diminished sense of well-being, impaired
    fertility, and changes in body composition, including
    reduced bone mineral density and lean body
    mass. In experimental animals, acute administration of
    cannabinoids has been shown to both decrease testosterone
    levels and disrupt normal spermatogenesis.
    Findings in humans have not been consistent.

    EFFECTS ON REPRODUCTIVE
    HORMONES IN MALES

    Studies in male rodents have shown significant decreases
    in both testosterone and gonadotropins7 with
    acute administration of 9-THC due to inhibition of the
    GnRH pulse generator8 in the hypothalamus. Similar
    effects have been demonstrated in primates. In the rhesus
    monkey, THC reduced testosterone levels by 65%,
    which lasted 1 hour.9 Chronic effects of cannabinoid administration
    are less clear. Although dose-dependent
    decreases in LH have been observed with chronic administration
    of 9- THC,10 the effect of chronic exposure
    is less dramatic than that of acute administration7 and
    may be related to the development of tolerance.11
    Human studies investigating the effects of
    cannabinoids on reproductive hormones have been
    conflicting. Lower testosterone levels have been reported
    in chronic marijuana users compared to nonusers,
    12 and acute decreases in both LH and testosterone
    have been observed after marijuana smoking,13 but
    multiple subsequent studies have not confirmed these
    findings.14-17 In one study, heavy chronic users were
    found to have similar testosterone levels compared to
    casual users at baseline and did not experience any significant
    alterations in testosterone after a 21-day period
    of intense marijuana smoking in a controlled research
    setting.14 A subsequent study of similar design by the
    same investigators showed no significant changes in
    integrated LH levels over the study period.16 These inconsistent
    observations may be due to differences in
    study design but also may reflect the development of
    tolerance, as suggested by the animal studies.
    Down-regulation and desensitization of CB1 receptors
    in the hypothalamus may underlie the weakening of effect
    observed with chronic cannabinoid administration.
    18,19

    EFFECTS ON
    TESTICULAR FUNCTION

    Marijuana and 9-THC can have direct effects on the
    testes. Reductions in testicular size have been observed
    in rodents20 and dogs21 with administration of cannabis
    extract. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules may
    provide an explanation for this observation21 and is
    dose dependent, with lower doses showing no appreciable
    effect.22 Abnormal sperm morphology has been
    characterized in rodents exposed to marijuana smoke23
    or 9-THC24 for a 5-day period. In vitro studies have
    demonstrated that cannabinoids directly inhibit

    Leydig cell function.25 The observed effects of
    cannabinoids on the testes notwithstanding, the impact
    on fertility is not clear. While 9-THC administration
    to mice 4 weeks prior to and during mating had no
    effect on fertility,26 impregnation rates for mates of
    THC-treated mice were significantly lower than untreated
    controls.27 This observation may be due in part
    to reduction in copulatory behavior.28
    In humans, effects on sperm production and morphology
    have also been observed. Dose-related
    oligospermia has been observed in chronic users.12
    Similarly, a 58% decrease in sperm concentration was
    reported in chronic users after intensive marijuana
    smoking without a significant change in LH or testosterone.
    29 Reversible reductions in sperm concentration
    were seen 5 to 6 weeks after the initiation of intensive
    smoking, suggesting an effect on sperm production.30
    In addition, abnormal sperm morphology has been
    noted in chronic smokers.31 Although these findings
    imply a significant effect on gonadal function in humans,
    the true impact of marijuana on fertility is not
    known. However, discontinuation of casual marijuana
    use is recommended for infertile men.32

    GYNECOMASTIA

    Gynecomastia is defined as the accumulation of breast
    tissue in men and results from increases in the circulating
    estrogen/androgen ratio.33 Marijuana has been associated
    with the development of gynecomastia in an
    early case series,1 but a case control study showed no
    association.34 Given the effects of marijuana on the HPG
    axis in males and the possibility that noncannabinoid
    components of marijuana smoke have affinity to the estrogen
    receptor,6 an association with gynecomastia is
    plausible but has not been convincingly demonstrated.

    HPG AXIS EFFECTS IN FEMALES

    The secretion of estrogen from the ovary and the regulation
    of the ovulatory cycle are tightly controlled by the
    secretion of gonadotropins from the anterior pituitary.
    With waning levels of estrogen and progesterone at the
    end of menses, FSH levels increase, stimulating the
    growth and development of an ovarian follicle and thus
    the production of estrogen. Estrogen reduces FSH and
    LH secretion by negative feedback, but when estrogen
    levels peak, a LH surge is provoked by positive feedback,
    causing ovulation. LH then stimulates the production
    of estrogen and progesterone by the corpus
    luteum. Marijuana and 9-THC have been shown to
    disrupt the normal ovulatory cycle and hormonal secretion
    in both animals and humans. However, similar
    to the findings in males, tolerance may develop over
    time, and the consequences of chronic use have not
    been firmly established.
    As seen in male rodents, studies in female rodents
    have shown that the acute administration of
    cannabinoids markedly decreases LH levels35,36 by suppressing
    LH pulsatile secretion. Direct and indirect effects
    on GnRH secretion have been implicated.2 The inhibition
    of gonadotropin secretion underlies the
    disruption of the ovulatory cycle. Administration of
    cannabinoids to rats blocked the LH surge normally
    leading to ovulation37 and abolished the ovulatory cycle
    in rats38,39 and rabbits.40
    Studies in monkeys have demonstrated similar
    acute effects of cannabinoids on female reproductive
    function. 9-THC decreased LH levels by 50% to 80%
    in monkeys41 and has been shown to suppress the LH
    surge, resulting in anovulation.42 After 3 to 4 months of
    chronic administration, however, normal menstrual
    cycles spontaneously returned in treated monkeys,
    which is thought to be related to the development of
    tolerance.43 Evidence for tolerance with long-term administration
    also comes from a study of rhesus monkeys
    given oral THC that showed no difficulties with
    conception.44
    The impact of marijuana and THC on humans has
    been less clear than in female animals. Some studies report
    a suppressive effect on LH secretion,45 while others
    show a stimulatory effect.46 These inconsistencies
    may be due to the timing of cannabinoid administration
    in relation to the ovulatory cycle. Mendelson et al45
    showed a 30% decrease in LH in women compared to
    controls 1 hour after administration of a marijuana cigarette
    (1 g 1.8% THC) when in the luteal phase but reported
    no effect in the follicular phase. In another
    study, a marijuana cigarette given in periovulatory
    stages increased LH levels,46 while no acute change in
    LH was seen in menopausal women.47
    Studies of the effects of marijuana on ovulation have
    also been inconsistent. While female chronic smokers
    have been shown to have normal menses after intensive
    smoking,48 some reports demonstrate increased
    anovulatory cycles and decreased length of the luteal
    phase.49 Women who smoke marijuana may have a
    slightly increased risk of infertility due to an ovulatory
    abnormality, which was shown in a case control study of
    female recreation drug users with primary infertility.50

    EFFECTS ON PROLACTIN
    Prolactin is synthesized in the anterior pituitary and is
    important in the stimulation of milk production and
    maintenance of lactation in mammals. Its release is un-
    der tonic inhibition by dopamine secretion from
    tuberoinfundibular neurons in the hypothalamus.
    Cannabinoids, including components of marijuana,
    modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons,51
    thereby altering prolactin secretion. Animal studies
    have demonstrated an acute reduction of prolactin levels
    after THC administration in both rodents52 and primates.
    53 Smith et al53 showed that prolactin was reduced
    by a maximum of84%in ovariectomized female
    monkeys and74%in males at 30 to 90 minutes by a single
    injection of THC.53 Not all findings in animals have
    been consistent, however, and may be dependent on
    the stage of the ovulatory cycle54 or the timing of
    prolactin measurement in relation to cannabinoid administration.
    55 Initial increases in prolactin after acute
    administration followed by significant decrements below
    baseline have been reported and may be due to a
    direct effect on the anterior pituitary.56
    Findings in humans reflect the inconsistencies seen
    in animal studies. Some studies have shown an acute
    prolactin decrease with administration,49 while others
    have found no changes.57 Similar to the observations in
    animals, changes in prolactin may be dependent on the
    menstrual cycle stage as an acute decrease in prolactin
    in females was reported after smoking a marijuana cigarette
    in the luteal phase but not in the follicular phase.58
    It is unknown whether changes in prolactin are seen
    with chronic marijuana use. Block et al17 found no differences
    in prolactin levels in both men and women in
    the largest cross-sectional study of chronic marijuana
    users.

    EFFECTS ON THE
    HYPOTHALAMICPITUITARY-
    ADRENAL AXIS

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are secreted by the adrenal gland
    in a diurnal pattern and play an essential role in carbohydrate,
    protein, and lipid metabolism; immunologic
    action; and renal and cardiac function. Physiological
    and psychological stresses provoke increased release of
    glucocorticoid, which is essential for the survival of the
    organism. The secretion of glucocorticoids is regulated
    by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) released by
    the anterior pituitary. Corticotropin-releasing hormone
    (CRH) synthesized in the hypothalamus regulates
    ACTH secretion and is affected by multiple hypothalamic
    neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine,
    and catecholamines. Cannabinoids alter HPA
    axis function by modulating CRH release either directly
    through CB1-mediated effects on CRH neurons
    in the paraventricular nucleus59 or indirectly through
    other hypothalamic pathways.2
    In multiple animal studies, acute administration of
    cannabinoids increased both ACTH and GC in a
    dose-related fashion,60-62 an effect that is likely mediated
    by an increase in CRH.63 Rodents administered potent
    CB1 agonist HU-210 had marked activation of the
    HPA axis, but at the highest doses, ACTH decreased
    while GC increased, suggestive of rapid negative feedback
    by GC.64 However, tolerance to these effects develops
    quickly with chronic administration.62
    Human studies have shown variable effects of marijuana
    and component cannabinoids on the HPA axis.
    Similar to the effects in animals, increased cortisol levels
    have been reported after acute administration of
    marijuana.65 However, in contrast to these findings, no
    change in the diurnal rhythm of cortisol secretion was
    observed during THC ingestion in chronic smokers.57
    Marijuana may also impair cortisol response to a stressful
    stimulus. Benowitz et al66 reported an impaired response
    to insulin -induced hypoglycemia after 4 days
    of oral THC ingestion.66 It is possible that prolonged
    activation of the HPA axis led to a reduction in
    adrenocortical reserve. It should be noted, however,
    that despite these statistically significant differences,
    clinical significance is unlikely in that all subjects had
    a cortisol response in the normal range (mean cortisol
    at maximum stimulation = 31.7 3.2 mcg/dl).

    EFFECTS ON
    GROWTH HORMONE

    Growth hormone (GH) is secreted by the anterior pituitary,
    stimulated by the hypothalamic release of growth
    hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and inhibited by
    somatostatin. Serotonin from the limbic system, dopamine
    in the arcuate nucleus, and catecholamines in the
    ventromedial nucleus influence GH secretion by increasing
    GHRH release. In the adult, GH has widespread
    effects on many aspects of metabolism. Adult
    onset growth hormone deficiency is characterized by
    changes in body composition (increased fat mass and
    decreased muscle mass), impaired sense of well-being,
    reduced bone mineral density, and reduced cardiac
    performance.
    Cannabinoids have been shown to inhibit GH secretion
    due to stimulation of somatostatin release.67 Acute
    decreases in GH have been observed with THC68 or
    HU-210 (a synthetic CB1 agonist) administration in
    rats.64 There are few studies investigating the effect of
    marijuana and other cannabinoids on GH secretion in
    humans. Benowitz et al66 showed that 4 days of oralTHC
    blunted the normal GH response to insulin-induced
    hypoglycemia, the “gold standard” test of GH axis in-
    NOVEMBER SUPPLEMENT 93S
    ENDOCRINE EFFECTS OF MARIJUANA
    tegrity. Long-term effects on GH dynamics in chronic
    marijuana users are unknown.

    THYROID HORMONE AXIS

    Thyroid hormones have widespread effects on cellular
    metabolism. Their synthesis and secretion are regulated
    by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the
    anterior pituitary, which in turn is controlled by
    thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). Cannabinoid effect
    on thyroid function was first noted in 1965, when
    marijuana extract was shown to reduce iodine accumulation
    in the rat thyroid.69 Acute administration of THC
    in rodents70,71 reduces levels of thyroxine and TSH by
    as much as 90% for up to 6 hours. In addition, marijuana
    extract has been shown to decrease the release of
    radioactive iodine from the thyroid.72 These effects are
    reversed by administration of exogenous TSH, suggesting
    a hypothalamic site of action.71,72 With chronic administration
    of THC, however, the thyroid depressant
    effect of cannabinoids is lost, which may indicate the
    development of tolerance.71 There are no data regarding
    the effect of cannabinoids on thyroid function in
    humans.

    EFFECTS ON THE NEUROENDOCRINE
    REGULATION OF FEEDING

    The neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying appetite
    and feeding behavior are being clarified. Hunger and
    satiety signals from the GI tract, adipose tissue, and various
    endocrine systems regulate a vast array of hypothalamic
    hormones that modulate feeding behavior.
    Leptin, a polypeptide hormone secreted by adipose tissue,
    is thought to be a major satiety factor and central
    regulator on hypothalamic feeding centers. Leptin may
    cause appetite suppression by down-regulating endogenous
    cannabinoids, such as anandamide and
    2-arachidonyl glycerol and other appetite-stimulating
    peptides.73 Exogenous cannabinoids (i.e., marijuana
    and THC) also stimulate appetite,74 likely through the
    activation of CB1 receptors in hypothalamic feeding
    centers. This effect provides the rationale for the use of
    oral THC in AIDS wasting.

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

    Marijuana and its active component THC affect multiple
    endocrine systems. A suppressive effect is seen on
    the reproductive hormones, prolactin, growth hormone,
    and the thyroid axis, while the HPA axis is activated.
    These effects are mediated through CB1 receptor
    activation in the hypothalamus, which directly or indirectly
    modulates anterior pituitary function. Many of
    the responses observed, however, are lost with chronic
    administration, which is likely due to the development
    of tolerance. Studies in humans have had inconsistent
    results that may reflect differences in study design, the
    hormonal milieu (e.g., stage in menstrual cycle), or the
    development of tolerance. Long-term effects on the various
    endocrine systems have not been clearly demonstrated,
    and clinical consequences, if present, are likely
    to be subtle.

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  16. #16
    Defconx3's Avatar
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    Refrences continued..

    51. Fernandez-Ruiz JJ, Navarro M, Hernandez ML, Vaticon D, Ramos
    JA: Neuroendocrine effects of an acute dose of Delta-9-
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    Defconx3's Avatar
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    Heres another...

    Effects of marijuana on testosterone in male subjects.

    Barnett G, Chiang CW, Licko V.

    Clinical studies have given contradictory reports on the effect of smoking marijuana on the plasma levels of testosterone in males. A reanalysis of existing data established that testosterone levels are depressed both after smoking one marijuana cigarette and after intravenous infusion of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a pharmacologically active component of marijuana. Simulation of the marijuana interaction, under the assumption that delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits testosterone production or secretion, suggests a minimum of 24 hours are required for testosterone to return to pre-smoking levels. A series of clinical studies are specified to clarify the nature of the interaction.

    PMID: 6316036 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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    crewe21 is offline Junior Member
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    WwwwHoooAaaa munchy munchy munchies!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Ok you know what...Im actually gonna read all 74 refrences..1st...most of em were done in animal studies and in vitro not vivo which is useless

    and post real ones..not ones where animals are given 50 times the dose to look good for banning

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    Quote Originally Posted by sblakersfan
    Is it bad if Im smoking lots of weed while im on winny?
    The LAST thing i want to eat when i smoke is chicken breast, tuna, and egg whites. hence why atleast I have to choose between chronic or cutting. my .02

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    Defconx3's Avatar
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    I think I have already made my point, I am beginning to feel that this is one of those arguements that have lots of evidence backing BOTH sides. This arguement could go on forever.

    Frankly speaking, I wouldn't give a shit about changes in natty test/estrogen while you are taking gear. The amount of unnatural hormones in your body dwarfs the amount of natural hormones, making such changes unimportant while on.

    Quote Originally Posted by 305GUY
    The LAST thing i want to eat when i smoke is chicken breast, tuna, and egg whites. hence why atleast I have to choose between chronic or cutting. my .02
    That was my main point. I know when I smoke, my judgement on which foods to eat or not goes out the window, I just get too hungry. If you are serious enough about cutting that you are taking synthetic hormones, you should also be serious enough to follow a strict diet. Weed does not help that.

    Again, I have made my side of the arguement clear. Take my opinion for what its worth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IronFreakX
    and post real ones..not ones where animals are given 50 times the dose to look good for banning
    Define "real ones". If you care to look, a lot of studies related to illegal recreational drugs are done on animals.

    Another thing, I don't want this to turn into some kind of arguement about whether or not you think weed should be legal. I personally think that it is a safer substance then alcohol and tobacco, and I do think it should be legal. However, I am simply responding to the original question which was "Is it bad if Im smoking lots of weed while im on winny?". I am trying to stick to that question, and it is safe to say that it most certainly isn't beneficial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johan
    a all you can eat buffets worst nightmare. A bunch of juiced upp muther****ers all stoned on a cheatday
    Hahah, count me in.

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    stryker5555 is offline Junior Member
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    I personaly think if your training hard why to improve your body why would you want to take in any mood or mind altering substance period...Look we are talking about pushing our bodies farther than we ever have before day in and day out... my opinion is there no time for recreational drugs at all

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    [QUOTE=Defconx3]I think I have already made my point, I am beginning to feel that this is one of those arguements that have lots of evidence backing BOTH sides. This arguement could go on forever.

    Frankly speaking, I wouldn't give a shit about changes in natty test/estrogen while you are taking gear. The amount of unnatural hormones in your body dwarfs the amount of natural hormones, making such changes unimportant while on.


    Maybe I'm a freak but weed does not turn me into a junk food monster. High or not high I eat clean. My bodyfat never goes above 10% and hypothetically I smoke more than my fair share. I'm sticking with everybody is different.

    Agreed. This arguement could go on forever.

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    305GUY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Defconx3
    I think I have already made my point, I am beginning to feel that this is one of those arguements that have lots of evidence backing BOTH sides. This arguement could go on forever.
    You got that right.

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    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    Anymore of this glorified drug talk and people are going to start receiving extended vacations.

    Some of you are just simply amazing.

    ~SC~

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