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  1. #1
    NickNOON is offline New Member
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    Injecting HGH into joints

    Anyone know if it's safe to inject HGH into a shoulder joint?
    I have heard a lot of positive outcome from people who've injected HGH directly into a damaged muscle.
    My injury is located in my shoulder joint, so what I need to know is, if it's dangerous to inject it? Eg. possibility of damaging or dissolving tissue, stuff like that.

  2. #2
    Billmister's Avatar
    Billmister is offline Member
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    bump...

  3. #3
    testprop's Avatar
    testprop is offline Associate Member
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    dude, do NOT inject into a joint yourself! that's a very delicate thing to do and even most MDs can't do it.

    Talk to an orthopedic and ask him to do it, trust me I'm a student at med school and know what I'm talking about

  4. #4
    the original jason is offline AR-Hall of Famer / Retired
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    yeah tp is right injecting into joints is like for cortizone shots only a good othopedic can do it, also I have heard and read that hgh causes jont problems not fixes them

    peace

  5. #5
    NickNOON is offline New Member
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    Originally posted by testprop
    dude, do NOT inject into a joint yourself! that's a very delicate thing to do and even most MDs can't do it.

    Talk to an orthopedic and ask him to do it, trust me I'm a student at med school and know what I'm talking about
    Actually I wouldn't be doing it myself, I wouldn't know where to inject it.


    Originally posted by The Original Jason
    yeah tp is right injecting into joints is like for cortizone shots only a good othopedic can do it, also I have heard and read that hgh causes jont problems not fixes them

    peace
    Where did you read that?

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    NickNOON is offline New Member
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    1.) HGH is injected sub Q not IM.

    2.) HGH can cause joints to become achy not the other way around ??

    Where did you get info that said injecting HGH IM in the joint would work bro ??

    IMO bro i would inject it the normal way sub Q in the stomach area ??

    just IMO though. i am not a med student or anything even close but do have a great interest in HGH so any new info you have I would like to read.

    Peace..PA

  8. #8
    NickNOON is offline New Member
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    I do know HGH is inject sub Q in the stomach area.

    Júst heard from a couple of people that injecting directly into muscles or joints could improve a possible injury.

    I appreciate the respons, I just got some "drug" (don't know the english word for it) prescribed by my doctor, which I'm confident will help... it has before.

  9. #9
    ironmaster's Avatar
    ironmaster is offline Associate Member
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    Since HGH causes tissue atrophy at the site of injection, I really don't think you would want to do this.

  10. #10
    ironfist's Avatar
    ironfist is offline Elite Hall Of Fame ~ RIP ~
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    Originally posted by The Original Jason
    yeah tp is right injecting into joints is like for cortizone shots only a good othopedic can do it, also I have heard and read that hgh causes jont problems not fixes them

    peace
    I've got a couple of friends who just got some cortisone from TJ and were going to try to inject themselves...Looks like I'd better give them a call..

  11. #11
    NickNOON is offline New Member
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    Originally posted by ironfist


    I've got a couple of friends who just got some cortisone from TJ and were going to try to inject themselves...Looks like I'd better give them a call..
    I've heard the term Cortisone a lot, but what exactly is it? Isn't it just a drug that takes the pain away?

  12. #12
    ironfist's Avatar
    ironfist is offline Elite Hall Of Fame ~ RIP ~
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    Originally posted by NickNOON


    I've heard the term Cortisone a lot, but what exactly is it? Isn't it just a drug that takes the pain away?
    I guess it's a pretty serious painkiller...gets rid of joint pain but you need to be very careful because you could seriously hurt yourself if you are injured and are using the cortisone so you can still compete/lift...You'll be doing damage and won't be able to feel it...

  13. #13
    NickNOON is offline New Member
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    Originally posted by ironfist


    I guess it's a pretty serious painkiller...gets rid of joint pain but you need to be very careful because you could seriously hurt yourself if you are injured and are using the cortisone so you can still compete/lift...You'll be doing damage and won't be able to feel it...
    Yeah I thought so. The drug I'm getting is a painkiller, but will also remove any infections in the joints and stuff like that. Helped a lot in the past, the only problem is that you can't have too much of it, as it is muscle degenerative.

  14. #14
    the original jason is offline AR-Hall of Famer / Retired
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    I've got a couple of friends who just got some cortisone from TJ and were going to try to inject themselves...Looks like I'd better give them a call..
    bro for sure dont want to be doing that let them know get a good orthopaedic to do it, I have researched a fair old bit about it cos I was gonna have it for my shoulders.

    Also cotisone is usually used for its anti inflamatory purposes but has many sides too, Also you can do much damage if using it while training hhere is a little something I found


    cortisone
    Related: Biographies Chemistry

    (kôr´tison) , steroid hormone whose main physiological effect is on carbohydrate metabolism. It is synthesized from cholesterol in the outer layer, or cortex, of the adrenal gland under the stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Cortisone is classed as a glucocorticoid with cortisol and corticosterone ; its effects include increased glucose release from the liver, increased liver glycogen synthesis, and decreased utilization of glucose by the tissues. These actions tend to counter the effects of insulin and may aggravate or mimic diabetes in sufficiently high doses. Cortisone also exerts an effect on salt retention in the kidneys similar to that of aldosterone , although it is not as potent. The hormone causes increased breakdown of proteins and decreased protein synthesis, and large doses given over a long period of time may result in inhibited growth in children or weakening of bones and wasting of muscles in adults. The principal medical use of cortisone comes from its anti-inflammatory and antiallergic effects; it is extremely useful in the treatment of innumerable diseases including asthma and other allergic reactions, arthritis, and various skin diseases. Cortisone is necessary to maintain life and enable the organism to respond to stress; failure of the adrenal glands to synthesize cortisone (Addison's disease) or surgical removal of the adrenals is fatal unless cortisone is given as replacement therapy. Although less cortisone is manufactured in the body than either cortisol or corticosterone and although cortisone is less potent than cortisol, the term cortisone is often used collectively to include the other glucocorticoids, both the naturally occurring and the synthetic compounds such as prednisone. Small quantities of cortisone were first isolated from animal adrenals in 1935-36. A method of manufacture, involving laboratory synthesis from an acid of bile , was developed, and in 1949 cortisone was first offered commercially. The specific mechanisms by which cortisone and similar compounds act are still poorly understood.


    peace

  15. #15
    the original jason is offline AR-Hall of Famer / Retired
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    something else interesting

    The quickest way for an athlete to lose strength at the ligament-bone junction (fibro-osseous junction) is to inject cortisone to that area. Cortisone and other steroid shots ALL have the same detrimental effects on articular cartilage.

    Corticosteroids, such as cortisone and Prednisone, have an adverse effect on bone and soft tissue healing. Corticosteroids inactivate vitamin D, limiting calcium absorption by the gastrointestinal tract, and increasing the urinary excretion of calcium. Bone also shows a decrease in calcium uptake with cortisone use, ultimately leading to weakness at the fibro-osseous junction. Corticosteroids also inhibit the release of Growth Hormone , which further decreases soft tissue and bone repair. Ultimately, corticosteroids lead to a decrease in bone, ligament, and tendon strength.

    Corticosteroids inhibit the synthesis of proteins, collagen, and proteoglycans in articular cartilage, by inhibiting chondrocyte production, the cells that comprise and produce the articular cartilage. The net catabolic effect (weakening) of corticosteroids is inhibition of fibroblast production of collagen, ground substance, and angiogenesis (new blood vessel formation). The result is weakened synovial joints, supporting structures, articular cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. This weakness increases the pain and the increased pain leads to more steroid injections. Cortisone injections should play almost no role in sports injury care. Although anti-inflammatory medications and steroid injections reduce pain, they do so at the cost of destroying tissue. In a study conducted by Siraya Chunekamrai, D.V.M., Ph.D., steroid shots, of a substance commonly used in humans, were given to horses. The injected tissue was looked at under the microscope. The steroid shots induced a tremendous amount of damage, including chondrocyte necrosis (cartilage cell damage), hypocellularity (decreased number of cells) in the joint, decreased proteoglycan content and synthesis, and decreased collagen synthesis in the joint. All of these effects were permanent.

    Dr. Chunekamrai concluded, “...the effects on cartilage of intra-articular injections of methylprednisolone acetate (steroid) were not ameliorated at eight weeks after eight weekly injections, or 16 weeks after a single injection. Cartilage remained biochemically and metabolically impaired.”22 In this study, some of the joints were injected only one time. Even after one steroid injection, cartilage remained biochemically and metabolically impaired. Other studies have confirmed similar harmful effects of steroids on joint and cartilage tissue. A cortisone shot can permanently damage joints. Prolotherapy injections have the opposite effect—they permanently strengthen joints, ligaments, and tendons.

    The problem with athletes is that they look for quick relief. The problem with cortisone is that the athlete may get pain relief, but it may be at the expense of permanent inability to participate in athletics. Athletes often receive cortisone shots in order to play. They go onto the playing field with an injury of such significant magnitude that they received a cortisone shot to relieve the pain. Unfortunately, they cannot feel the pain anymore so they play as if there was no injury. We know that the injury could not possibly be healed because of the tremendous anti-healing properties of cortisone. Thus the athlete is further injured from the cortisone, as well as playing with an injury, thereby worsening the already bad injury.

    Cortisone is so dangerous to the athlete because it inhibits just about every aspect of healing. Cortisone inhibits prostaglandin and leukotriene production. It also inhibits chondrocyte production of protein polysaccharides (proteoglycans), which are the major constituents of articular ground substance. Behrens and colleagues reported a persistent and highly significant reduction in the synthesis of proteins, collagen, and proteoglycans in the articular cartilage of rabbits who received weekly injections of glucocorticoids. They also reported a progressive loss of endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus, as the number of injections increased.

    Exercise has the opposite effect. Exercise has been shown to positively affect articular cartilage by increasing its thickness, enhancing the infusion of nutrients, and increasing matrix synthesis. However, the effects of doing them together were not studied until recently.

    Dr. Prem Gogia and associates at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, did an excellent study bringing out the dangers of an athlete exercising after receiving a cortisone shot. They divided animals into three groups:

    1. Group One: received a cortisone shot

    2. Group Two: received a cortisone shot and exercised

    3. Group Three: control group, received no treatment

    This study was done in 1993 and was the first study to look at the effects of exercising after receiving a cortisone shot. The authors performed this study because it is common practice in sports medicine to give an athlete a cortisone shot for an acute or chronic injury. Athletes are typically returning to full-intensity sports activities within a few hours to one to two days after receiving the shot. The results of the study were unbelievable. The animals receiving the cortisone shots showed a decrease in chondrocytes, but when they received the cortisone shot and exercised, the chondrocyte cell count decreased by another 25 percent. Degenerated cartilage was seen in all of the cortisone-injected animals, but severe cartilage damage was seen in 67 percent of the animals that exercised and received cortisone. The cortisone and exercise group also showed a significant decline in glycosaminoglycan synthesis compared to the other groups. The authors concluded, “...the results suggest that running exercise in combination with intra-articular injections results in damage to the femoral articular cartilage.”

  16. #16
    ironwise is offline New Member
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    Nice post. I used to recieve cortisone shots in my AC joints of both shoulders. I stopped because it has a very catabolic affect on the body. It was very good on taking the pain away but it was only temp and it just masked the damage to the shoulder while I continued to work out. The only thing it did was help me increase the damage to the shoulders. Also I would never attempt to inject anything into a joint. I would suggest getting someone with alot of exp to do the job. Better safe than sorry. Peace

    IRONWISE

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