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  1. #1
    Buschlightcan's Avatar
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    Personally Supply Across Mexico Border

    I was reading around and i herd that a single person is allowed to take acertian amount acroos the mexican border if you declare it first. I wanted to know if any of you guys have done this before or if anyone has any docummented articles about this subject.

  2. #2
    MBaraso's Avatar
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    You can't declare steriods at the border. Or any kind of schedual 3 drug for that matter...
    I know there's certain things u can declare but I know AS isn't one of em.

  3. #3
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    Actually you can!!!! I have done it, as well as a handful of other people I know as well. Go to Elite and I know some bros have done it from there as well. You can find the logistics at the us customs site. Print a copy of the ammended law (must be .pdf). If you don't believe me call your local customs agency, and if the person you talk to is dumb, talk to a supervisor. There are restrictions however but you will find it all on the customs web site. Go ahead and call me a liar, but next time you come to NM I will take you myself, and when it's all said and done you can buy me a beer

  4. #4
    MBaraso's Avatar
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    Well ichabodcrane to be honest I always was under the impression that it was illegal to import any kind of AS to the U.S. unless u had a liscense to do so. Maybe I'm wrong. If this is the case then why are people going thru the trouble of hiding it? Hey if you're right then I learned something new today :-)

  5. #5
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    I took this from a post on another board. You can make up your own mine.


    Don't listen to the BS you here on the boards take it from a guy who knows what he's talking about. Rick Collins from www.steroidlaw.com goes into this in his book, here's from it:

    "This exemption has been the topic of many online discussion board threads,with some amateur legal analysts concluding that bodybuilders can lawfully import juice...as long as they bring no more than fifty dosage unit at a time. Bad Advice. This exemption, even on its face, is actually of very little applicability to musclehead....{goes into how the exemption aren't met}...
    Now, might there be occasional instances of relaxed enforcement discretion where Customs inspectors allow some folks to enter with declared Mexican anabolics even though one or more exemption criteria aren't met? While it's been reported to me that such instances have occured, and I'm sure that they have, only a fool would count on it. Nobody can say with certainty what might actually happen at any particular border crossing on any given day."

    Dosages...

    "Oral anabolic steroids : one unit means fifty (50) tablets.

    Injectable anabolic steroids : one unit means a 10cc vial

    ...All vials of injectible steroids are to be converted on the basis of their volume to the equivalent number of 10cc vials (one 50cc vial is to be counted as five 10cc vials" -Taken from Legal Muscle


    Theres so much more he goes into but that relates to you, anyone getting legal advice on the boards should be careful. Half the stuff i hear on the boards contradicts what he says on his book. This is def a book that everyone this game should read.

  6. #6
    destroying angle is offline Junior Member
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    This is a section from DEA website.

    Section 1301.26 Exemptions from import or export requirements for personal medical use.
    Any individual who has in his/her possession a controlled substance listed in schedules II, III, IV, or V, which he/she has lawfully obtained for his/her personal medical use, or for administration to an animal accompanying him/her, may enter or depart the United States with such substance notwithstanding sections 1002-1005 of the Act (21 U.S.C. 952-955), providing the following conditions are met:

    (a) The controlled substance is in the original container in which it was dispensed to the individual; and

    (b) The individual makes a declaration to an appropriate official of the U.S. Customs Service stating:


    (1) That the controlled substance is possessed for his/her personal use, or for an animal accompanying him/her; and
    (2) The trade or chemical name and the symbol designating the schedule of the controlled substance if it appears on the container label, or, if such name does not appear on the label, the name and address of the pharmacy or practitioner who dispensed the substance and the prescription number, if any; and
    (c) The importation of the controlled substance for personal medical use is authorized or permitted under other Federal laws and state law.

    [62 FR 13952, Mar. 24, 1997]
    And from Rick Collins steroidlaw

    Note (G) to Drug Quantity Table, Section 2D1.1 sets a "discounted" formula by which to assess quantity. For oral steroids , fifty (50) tablets are one dosage unit. For injectable steroids , one dosage unit is a ten (10) cc vial. So, for example, two 1,000 tablet packages of methandrostenolone (Dianabol ) would be only 40 total dosage units - a meager amount. Yet Customs agents and Postal Inspectors who have intercepted lesser amounts have frequently treated the suspect like a drug kingpin! [Note that under 21 U.S.C. 956(a), Congress exempted importations of controlled substances in amounts of up to fifty (50) dosage units for personal medical use when properly declared at U.S. land borders. Regrettably, few Customs agents profess to be aware of this, and I recently found myself educating them while defending a federal border case.]

    And from the Customs website.

    Medication
    Rule of thumb: When you go abroad, take the medicines you'll need, no more, no less.

    Narcotics and certain other drugs with a high potential for abuse - Rohypnol, GHB, and Fen-Phen, to name a few - may not be brought into the United States, and there are severe penalties for trying to bring them in. If you need medicines that contain potentially addictive drugs or narcotics (e.g., some cough medicines, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, antidepressants, or stimulants), do the following:


    Declare all drugs, medicinals, and similar products to the appropriate Customs official.

    Carry all drugs, medicinals, and similar products in their original containers.

    Carry only the quantity of such substances that a person with that condition(e.g., chronic pain) would normally carry for his/her use.

    >>Carry a prescription or written statement from your physician that the substances are being used under a doctor's supervision and that they are necessary for your physical well-being while traveling.

    U.S. residents entering the United States at international land borders, who are carrying a validly obtained controlled substance (except narcotics such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, or LSD), are subject to certain additional requirements. If a U.S. resident wants to bring in a controlled substance other than narcotics such as marijuana, cocaine, heroine, or LSD, but does not have a prescription for the substance issued by a U.S.-licensed practitioner (e.g., physician, dentist, etc.) registered with and authorized by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to prescribe the mediation, the individual may not import more than 50 dosage units of the medication. if the U.S. Resident has a prescription for the controlled substance issued by a DEA registrant, more than 50 dosage units may be imported by that person, provided all other legal requirements are met.

  7. #7
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    I never thought that you could claim gear and get across the boarder, i have to look into it more, but i might have to see first hand what the deal is. "TJ" just down the road.

  8. #8
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    Originally posted by MBaraso
    Well ichabodcrane to be honest I always was under the impression that it was illegal to import any kind of AS to the U.S. unless u had a liscense to do so. Maybe I'm wrong. If this is the case then why are people going thru the trouble of hiding it? Hey if you're right then I learned something new today :-)
    MB, this is a fairly new ammendment (well not really, but it has been kept in the bag). I still think people are unaware of it, and I know some people who have not abided by the US guidelines who were not allowed to cross. So this may be why they still feel more comfortable stashing it. As long as you follow the personal use guideline, and make sure it is a type of med readily available in the US for legit purposes (primoteston, stenox, deca etc.) this ammendment applies. I encourage you to read it, and read it again. There is always room for interpretation. Most of the customs agents are not educated on this ammendment, that is why I told you to print out a copy from us customs web site, and might be a good idea to print out the DEA one as well. I have read Rick's part on this topic, and will make no comment. This seems to be a grey area still. But from experience, and by the ammended law it is possible to do this. Talk to a supervising customs agent and show them the ammendment's you have printed out and discuss this with them before you cross. If they agree with you, have them available for contact if you run into problems coming back. Be sensible, read both the DEA and US customs websites, it is there in black and white. This does not mean they have to let you across with these items, but it is a tool to be used for our advantage. I just know I have done it, I wasn't even questioned. I just declared them and that was that. But, it might not be a bad idea to have the papers and preapproval of a supervising customs agent just incase you come in contact with one who is not as well informed, or tries to hassle you
    Last edited by ichabodcrane; 02-02-2003 at 11:50 AM.

  9. #9
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    ichabodcrane i was wondering if you could post a link to the website that contains the official doccument or maybe post it here. I am very close to the border and am going to call a customs officail within the next few days to find out what the deal is.

    bump

  10. #10
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    Yes, Ichabod, please post the link. I had heard the rule of 50 dosage units last summer, and I was going to try it until I had my friend talk to his cousin who is a border patrol agent (customs official?) in Laredo. He said that you cannot bring them back over, and so I did not try it. He said they have a list of things to look for, and aas were on that list. When i did cross the border last summer, I got a brief glimpse (10 seconds) of the "things to look for that are illegal to bring back list" that the customs officials look at. I noticed that both Deca , and Primotest are on that list. So, I have been under the assumption that the "50 dosage units" rule was a myth. Next time I'm in the area, I'll have a talk with an official before I go over.

  11. #11
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    here is the link you guys are looking for
    http://www.customs.ustreas.gov/travel/med.htm

  12. #12
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    Calidude the link you posted doesnt work. Is there another one that can post.

  13. #13
    m16a2 is offline Senior Member
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    I have declared meds at the border before and it really probably depends on the customs officer. However, there is a list of items that they are looking for in particular. These include any drugs that are commonly abused in the US, and especially AAS. They have a large incidence of people x'ing over the border to get AAS and they are very aware that it happens illegally. If you declare it, it is very unlikely that they will allow you to bring it in. Keep in mind that if it is VET gear, your chances are nil.

    So the cost would be finding human grade AAS and chancing declaring them at the border. You will probably be spending alot more money than vet gear, and the risk of them not allowing you to bring it over (confiscation) is high. Any reasonable person wouldn't even try it.

  14. #14
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    Incase anyoe else is wondering i decided to post another thread on Elitefitness.
    http://boards.elitefitness.com/forum...hreadid=208396

  15. #15
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    Medication
    Rule of thumb: When you go abroad, take the medicines you'll need, no more, no less.


    Narcotics and certain other drugs with a high potential for abuse - Rohypnol, GHB, and Fen-Phen, to name a few - may not be brought into the United States, and there are severe penalties for trying to bring them in. If you need medicines that contain potentially addictive drugs or narcotics (e.g., some cough medicines, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, antidepressants, or stimulants), do the following:

    Declare all drugs, medicinals, and similar products to the appropriate Customs official.
    Carry all drugs, medicinals, and similar products in their original containers.
    Carry only the quantity of such substances that a person with that condition(e.g., chronic pain) would normally carry for his/her use.
    Carry a prescription or written statement from your physician that the substances are being used under a doctor's supervision and that they are necessary for your physical well-being while traveling.

    U.S. residents entering the United States at international land borders, who are carrying a validly obtained controlled substance (except narcotics such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, or LSD), are subject to certain additional requirements. If a U.S. resident wants to bring in a controlled substance other than narcotics such as marijuana, cocaine, heroine, or LSD, but does not have a prescription for the substance issued by a U.S.-licensed practitioner (e.g., physician, dentist, etc.) registered with and authorized by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to prescribe the mediation, the individual may not import more than 50 dosage units of the medication. if the U.S. Resident has a prescription for the controlled substance issued by a DEA registrant, more than 50 dosage units may be imported by that person, provided all other legal requirements are met.


    Please note that only medications that can be legally prescribed in the United States may be imported for personal use. Be aware that possession of certain substances may also violate state laws.


    Warning: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prohibits the importation, by mail or in person, of fraudulent prescription and nonprescription drugs and medical devices. These include unorthodox "cures" for such medical conditions as cancer, AIDS, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis. Although such drugs or devices may be legal elsewhere, if the FDA has not approved them for use in the United States, they may not legally enter the country and will be confiscated if found, even if they were obtained under a foreign physician's prescription.


    For specifics about importing controlled substances call (202) 307-2414 . For additional information about traveling with medication, contact your nearest FDA office or write Food and Drug Administration, Division of Import Operations and Policy, Room 12-8 (HFC-170), 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, or read the FDA's Subchapter on Coverage of Personal Importations.

  16. #16
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    I speak on my personal experience, I came back from Asia a few months ago, bringing anything back is a gamble. I think what would happen, depending on the amount, they would take it and let you walk. Or fine you and arrest you, but doubtful. I had no problems leaving asia or arriving in the states. Not one bag searched. I did bring stuff back too, small amounts, just pack it well, mix it in with other toiletries, be creative. Or try shipping small packages back, i did that too, seems to work well. Recieved everything ok in 4 days.
    just my 2 cents.

  17. #17
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    Just remember as soon as you get into the US and don't have a prescription you are breaking the state law and can be arrested. May not happen but it is a risk and I have heard of guys getting pulled over ten miles from the border and searched.

  18. #18
    m16a2 is offline Senior Member
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    Originally posted by Rickson
    Just remember as soon as you get into the US and don't have a prescription you are breaking the state law and can be arrested. May not happen but it is a risk and I have heard of guys getting pulled over ten miles from the border and searched.

    It sounds like your referring to the border stations. I know for a fact that they are located at the Texas-Mexico border cities. It's like a station thats about 10 miles from the border, and they can pull you over, check your ID and see if there is probably cause to search your sorry ass.

    I've talked to various people who have been stopped before, with gear, and were allowed to continue without any further interrogation. Just make sure you have your registration and license and papers all in order.

    It's not worth going to jail because you forgot to renew the registration on your vehicle.

  19. #19
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    icobodecrane can you please post the amendment that states this statue exactly. It would be of great help.

  20. #20
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    Calm down friends, I just got home from school. Anyways the us customs site was redesigned, so I had to search for it, but here it is:
    Read it carefully, and do not confuse drugs for approved use with drugs for unapproved use!
    http://www.customs.gov/xp/cgov/trave...tion_drugs.xml

    Here is some extra stuff: Read it! at the bottom is the link to DEA and official print out
    Text only of letters sent from the
    Committee on Energy and Commerce Democrats

    March 14, 2001



    Bernard Schwetz, D.V.M., Ph.D.
    Acting Principal Deputy Commissioner
    Food and Drug Administration
    Room 14-71 (HF-1)
    5600 Fishers Lane
    Rockville, Maryland 20857

    Mr. Charles Winwood
    Acting Commissioner
    United States Customs Service
    1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
    Washington, D.C. 20229

    Mr. Donnie R. Marshall
    Administrator
    Drug Enforcement Administration
    Information Services Section (CPI)
    2401 Jefferson Davis Highway
    Alexandria, Virginia 22301

    Dear Dr. Schwetz, Acting Commissioner Winwood, and Administrator Marshall:

    Pursuant to Rules X and XI of the U.S. House of Representatives, the Committee on Energy and Commerce is examining implementation of policies concerning personal importation of prescription drugs at the Mexico-U.S. border. Last month, Committee staff traveled to San Ysidro, California, to meet with U.S. Customs Service and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials in order to discuss a range of issues relating to U.S. residents traveling to Mexico to purchase prescription drugs. Specifically, staff was interested in knowing (1) the sources and quality of the drugs being purchased at border pharmacies; (2) the types of drugs being declared at the Mexico-U.S. border; and (3) FDA and U.S. Customs' interpretations of current policies that allow for some drug importation for personal use.

    Thousands of U.S. residents cross into Mexico each week; many use such excursions to purchase prescription drugs from the numerous conspicuous pharmacies that exist on the Mexican side of the border. According to the August 24, 2000, San Diego Weekly Reader, it is estimated that there are 1,000 pharmacies in Tijuana, Mexico, or one pharmacy for every 1,300 residents. By contrast, the city of San Diego has about 125 pharmacies, or one pharmacy for every 10,800 residents. According to the same article, of the Tijuana pharmacies that sell controlled drugs, "around 20 percent of them will sell without a prescription, and most of the rest will recommend a doctor who will give you the prescription."

    During the visit to the Tijuana border at the port of San Ysidro, U.S. Customs Service inspectors discussed the problem of personal importations of prescription drugs and controlled substances such as OxyContin, a narcotic painkiller that reportedly has been a factor in the deaths of at least 120 people in the U.S. In echoing these concerns about personal importation of controlled substances, the Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse in its December 2000 Research Brief entitled, "Substance Abuse Trends in Texas," stated: "A major problem [related to Texas drug abuse] is that Mexican pharmacies sell many controlled substances to U.S. citizens who declare these drugs and then legally bring up to a 90-day supply into the state."

    In 1998, the Congress responded to concerns about U.S. residents bringing in controlled substances over the Mexican border into the U.S. by enacting an amendment to the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act. That amendment limited personal imports of controlled substances at land ports of entry to 50 dosage units for U.S. residents who did not possess a valid U.S. prescription. Nevertheless, both the enactment and the interpretation of that law appear to have unintentionally exacerbated the problem of persons bringing potentially dangerous substances into the United States.

    Currently, some internal policies at the U.S. Customs Service appear almost "geared" toward permitting U.S. residents to personally import amounts of 50 dosage units or less of controlled substances. A June 29, 2000, internal memorandum by the U.S. Customs Service Port Director of Laredo, Texas states:

    "In summary, the controlled substances must be declared to Customs upon arrival, be for that individual's personal use, and be in their original container. If all these conditions are met, a United States resident may import the type and amount of the controlled substance (except those in Schedule I or other prohibited substances) as specified on the prescription. If the controlled substances are declared, but the United States resident does not possess a valid prescription issued by a practitioner as defined above, the United States resident may bring in only an amount not to exceed 50 dosage units. Remember that the 50 dosage units amount applies to each type of controlled substance being imported. In other words, if the resident is importing 3 different types of controlled substances, the resident may import up to 50 dosage units for each type for a total of 150 dosage units."

    What this memorandum and other policies do not emphasize, at least not explicitly, is that (1) importing such drugs may violate other Federal and state laws, and (2) that Customs inspectors have the enforcement discretion to refuse their admission, particularly in cases where potentially dangerous drugs are involved. (One could argue, for example, that any foreign-made controlled substances brought into this country by a U.S. resident traveler by definition would violate the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act because these products are automatically, under the law, deemed adulterated, misbranded, or unapproved drugs.) This memorandum alone seems to suggest that the general rule at the border for Customs officials to follow is to allow individuals to bring in such drugs, while the exception is to deny their entry.

    Finally, while some policies do attempt to provide field staff with more balanced guidance in this regard, the advice given is often unrealistic. For example, a December 15, 1999, U.S. Customs Service Headquarters Directive, 3310-006, notes that personal amounts of 50 dosage units or less may be precluded from import based on all other applicable Federal and state laws. That Directive states:

    "When the type of drug, the quantity, or the combination of various drugs arouse suspicions, U.S. Customs Inspectors should contact the nearest FDA office (or DEA [Drug Enforcement Administration] office if controlled substances are involved) for advice. These offices will provide guidance concerning whether to release or detain the article."

    The obtaining of such guidance is simply impractical. Committee staff visits to the ports of Laredo, Texas, and San Ysidro, California, (two of the world's largest border crossings) confirmed that constrained resources do not allow for either FDA or DEA personnel to have even a single person physically located at these checkpoints (during all hours of operation) for such consultations. The notion that Customs inspectors could somehow detain U.S. residents during the crush of tourist traffic at border crossings while trying to contact FDA or DEA personnel on the telephone for advice is simply unrealistic. In fact, existing Customs inspectors, in some cases, are valiantly trying themselves to make determinations of suspicious imports by consulting manuals or other online information sources on various prescription drugs. In short, we believe that these inspectors need clearer guidance than the current 50 dosage-unit policy and stronger support for precluding suspicious personal imports of controlled substances.

    We understand that the DEA, U.S. Customs Service, and the FDA will be meeting the week of March 12, 2001, with the Committee staff to present a unified recommendation on how to improve policies in the handling of controlled substances brought across the border. Please treat this letter as authorization to provide the Committee staff, to the extent appropriate, any non-public information during this briefing.

    In addition, please provide the following by Friday, March 30, 2001:

    1. Because a requirement exists that any drugs brought into the U.S. through a land border must be declared, please provide all formal or informal lists of all controlled substances known to be imported by U.S. residents at the Mexico-U.S. border since March 13, 2000. If no lists exist, please explain why that is the case.

    2. All records relating to communications since March 13, 2000, (including those between the FDA, the DEA, or the U.S. Customs Service) concerning the abuse potential of controlled substances listed above.

    3. All records relating to communications since March 13, 2000, (including those between the FDA, the DEA, or the U.S. Customs Service) raising concerns about controlled substances imported by U.S. residents at the Mexico-U.S. border.

    4. All records relating to communications since March 13, 2000, (including those between the FDA, the DEA, or the U.S. Customs Service) concerning advice on personal imports of controlled substances.

    5. All records since March 13, 2000, relating to a tracking system of declared personal import drug entries.

    Please note that, for the purpose of responding to these requests, the terms "records" and "relating" should be interpreted in accordance with the attachment to this letter.

    Thank you for your assistance. If you have any questions, please contact us or have your staff contact Alan Slobodin of the Majority Committee Staff at (202) 225-2927 or Christopher Knauer of the Minority Committee staff at (202) 226-3400.

    Sincerely,

    W.J. "BILLY" TAUZIN
    CHAIRMAN
    COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE

    JOHN D. DINGELL
    RANKING MEMBER
    COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND
    COMMERCE

    JAMES C. GREENWOOD
    CHAIRMAN
    SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT
    AND INVESTIGATIONS

    PETER DEUTSCH
    RANKING MEMBER
    SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT
    AND INVESTIGATIONS

    ATTACHMENT



    1. The term "records" is to be construed in the broadest sense and shall mean any written or graphic material, however produced or reproduced, of any kind or description, consisting of the original and any non-identical copy (whether different from the original because of notes made on or attached to such copy or otherwise) and drafts and both sides thereof, whether printed or recorded electronically or magnetically or stored in any type of data bank, including, but not limited to, the following: correspondence, memoranda, records, summaries of personal conversations or interviews, minutes or records of meetings or conferences, opinions or reports of consultants, projections, statistical statements, drafts, contracts, agreements, purchase orders, invoices, confirmations, telegraphs, telexes, agendas, books, notes, pamphlets, periodicals, reports, studies, evaluations, opinions, logs, diaries, desk calendars, appointment books, tape recordings, video recordings, e-mails, voice mails, computer tapes, or other computer stored matter, magnetic tapes, microfilm, microfiche, punch cards, all other records kept by electronic, photographic, or mechanical means, charts, photographs, notebooks, drawings, plans, inter-office communications, intra-office and intra-departmental communications, transcripts, checks and canceled checks, bank statements, ledgers, books, records or statements of accounts, and papers and things similar to any of the foregoing, however denominated.

    2. The terms "relating," "relate," or "regarding" as to any given subject means anything that constitutes, contains, embodies, identifies, deals with, or is in any manner whatsoever pertinent to that subject, including but not limited to records concerning the preparation of other records.



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    CFR 1301.26 and exemptions:


    Link Directly to Content DEA Diversion Control Program Logo and Banner

    Regulations & Codified CSA > CFR > Section 1301 > Section 1301.26
    Code of Federal Regulations
    Section 1301.26 Exemptions from import or export requirements for personal medical use.

    Any individual who has in his/her possession a controlled substance listed in schedules II, III, IV, or V, which he/she has lawfully obtained for his/her personal medical use, or for administration to an animal accompanying him/her, may enter or depart the United States with such substance notwithstanding sections 1002-1005 of the Act (21 U.S.C. 952-955), providing the following conditions are met:

    (a) The controlled substance is in the original container in which it was dispensed to the individual; and

    (b) The individual makes a declaration to an appropriate official of the U.S. Customs Service stating:

    (1) That the controlled substance is possessed for his/her personal use, or for an animal accompanying him/her; and
    (2) The trade or chemical name and the symbol designating the schedule of the controlled substance if it appears on the container label, or, if such name does not appear on the label, the name and address of the pharmacy or practitioner who dispensed the substance and the prescription number, if any; and

    (c) The importation of the controlled substance for personal medical use is authorized or permitted under other Federal laws and state law.

    [62 FR 13952, Mar. 24, 1997]

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    Here is where you can print out a the 1301.26 exemption. Be sure to see the bottom of the page and click on "Government Printing Office" to get an official version:
    http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/21...01/1301_26.htm

    Note, and I say Note: this is still a very grey area, and even politicians, customs agents, lawyers etc. will interperet this ammendment differently. All I can say is here is the ammendment, it says you can legally do so as long you follow the guidelines (personal use, approved US medication -so primoteston, deca etc, not sustanon ), personal supply etc. I talked to a customs agent before I crossed and I showed him the documentation from both the dea and customs site, and he agreed as long as I complied with the guidelines it should be fine....and it was! Now since I said this is still a grey area, you may find a customs agent who does not understand this ammendment and will try and prevent you from crossing with your meds. But, like I said before, it may be a good idea to talk to a superior customs agent, show them the documentation, expalin it is for personal use only etc. and ask if you have any problems that the superior be contacted. I know some of you won't believe me, and that's ok. You don't have to! I am just giving you my experience (you can search elite for others), as well as proper documentation. I don't know how long this ammendment will last, and I am sure it will be modified in the near future, because our gov. doesn't want us to have control of our lives. So fuck em! Peace and good luck. If you ever come to NM, let me know and we can go down together. But you will have to buy me a beer when we get back





    Last edited by ichabodcrane; 01-31-2003 at 08:09 PM.

  21. #21
    Decoder's Avatar
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    ichabodcrane "Actually you can!!!!" ACTUALLY YOU CAN'T MY FRIEND GOT A 4K FINE DOING THAT ! in september last year 2002. THAT SHIT YOU POSTED IS 4 YEARS OLD! [62 FR 13952, Mar. 24, 1997]
    Last edited by Decoder; 01-31-2003 at 10:47 PM.

  22. #22
    ichabodcrane's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Decoder
    ichabodcrane "Actually you can!!!!" ACTUALLY YOU CAN'T MY FRIEND GOT A 4K FINE DOING THAT ! in september last year 2002. THAT SHIT YOU POSTED IS 4 YEARS OLD! [62 FR 13952, Mar. 24, 1997]
    Did you claim them, or did you have them concealed? Why would they fine you for declaring medication at the border? Anyways, yes this ammendment is older, but has it been ammended since its original date? Not yet! Like I said, I think it can and will be loosely interpereted, by everyone. All I know is that I have done it, as well as several bros on elite. I don't know why they would fine you for declaring meds, if you were trying to conceal them, then yes. But it is not illegal to declare any medication. Customs can deny passage of meds, but I still dont get why they fined you for declaring them?????

  23. #23
    ichabodcrane's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Decoder
    ichabodcrane "Actually you can!!!!" ACTUALLY YOU CAN'T MY FRIEND GOT A 4K FINE DOING THAT ! in september last year 2002. THAT SHIT YOU POSTED IS 4 YEARS OLD! [62 FR 13952, Mar. 24, 1997]
    Actually read it a little closer, [62 FR 13952, Mar. 24, 1997], is just the ammendment stating you can possess meds for personal use. It is not the ammendment to the CSA!!

  24. #24
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    you can declare at border and bring in a personal supply but...customs won't bother you but if you get stopped by police or any other law enforcement agency they can get arrest you ....customs really doesn't care as long as you declare there job is to patrol the border...other cops i.e. local , fbi, dea abid by the law of the land

  25. #25
    m16a2 is offline Senior Member
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    Originally posted by Jarod
    you can declare at border and bring in a personal supply but...customs won't bother you but if you get stopped by police or any other law enforcement agency they can get arrest you ....customs really doesn't care as long as you declare there job is to patrol the border...other cops i.e. local , fbi, dea abid by the law of the land
    The keywords in the statue are legitmate personal medical usage. All customs officers have their own discretion in the matter, but the best way to plan is to plan assuming the worst. The worst case is that the customs officer grills you about a. whether the drug is needed, b. whether he can reasonable believe that its for personal use, c. is the usage of the drug something a doctor would recommend.

    Under the statue he is authorized to detain you and call the local FDA office to make sure that the drug is FDA approved. I believe he can also call the local DEA office to make sure its not a controlled substance, however it is very unlikely that will happen.

    I have been grilled by the customs officer for meds in the past. TRUST me though, it is definitely an officer-officer (any given sunday rule) situation. The customs guy had no problem with me bringing clomid over, but he grilled me on the clen . He almost took away the mexican somas I bought since he didn't believe I needed them.

    Whatever you choose to do, be safe and plan everything out. Let us know the outcome!

  26. #26
    ichabodcrane's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Decoder
    ichabodcrane "Actually you can!!!!" ACTUALLY YOU CAN'T MY FRIEND GOT A 4K FINE DOING THAT ! in september last year 2002. THAT SHIT YOU POSTED IS 4 YEARS OLD! [62 FR 13952, Mar. 24, 1997]
    Instead of saying "actually you can", I should have said "it may be possible". I am not telling people to go down to Mex and buy AAS, and by doing so you won't encounter ANY problems. I still think this is, and will remain a very grey area! I didn't mean to mislead anyone, I just want to provide the information available and testify to my experience.

  27. #27
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    rampage sum'd It up.

  28. #28
    RitcheyRch is offline New Member
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    Do you guys think it is safer to drive across and get gear or to walk across.

  29. #29
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    I think it is much safer to walk across. I know plenty of people who have walked across.

  30. #30
    Brett3535 is offline New Member
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    what would deca an eq cost in Mexico as I am going there in 2 weeks! Not that I need some though!

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    i know this post is 2 years old, so the **** what? I like this subject

    EQ is cheap in Mexico, probably half the price you'd buy it for in the American black market
    Last edited by 19inchpythons; 03-24-2005 at 08:57 PM.

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