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Thread: temazepam

  1. #1
    DIGGS is offline New Member
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    temazepam

    Are you fellas familiar with this.I was wondering how potent it is and if it is safe to take.I was having trouble falling asleep so I started snoopin around the medicine cabnet and found my moms script.

  2. #2
    TNT's Avatar
    TNT
    TNT is offline Retired Moderator
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    Cool Snoopin' for Mom's Scripts?

    DIGGS, bro, it's great to have you here, and I'm glad that you've asked the question before popping your mom's pills.

    But based on your phrasing, I have to asume you're under 18, in which case I would recommend that you not use Temazepam - not because I have any hang-up about your age, but because medically, Temazepam is specifically contraindicated for anyone under 18.

    So what I'm about to say to you is based upon the assumption that you really need some help sleeping and that you're not just looking for some drug jollies. Take good notes, bro, there will be a quiz at the end of class.

    Here's the basic gist: Temazepam is a benzodiazepine (similar to Valium, probably the most well-known benodiazepine), and is usually prescribed for anxiety or insomnia. (As some lifters know, Valium is also prescribed as a muscle relaxant, but not Temazepam.) It's from a very old family of drugs - the benodiazepines are not prescribed very often these days in favor of more modern drugs.

    How potent is it? As with any drug, that depends (among other things) on your age, your body make-up, and any other drugs you might be taking - that's important, since you indicated in another post that you're planning on doing a cycle. Temazepam (which is also sold under the brand name Restoril) comes in two strengths - 15 mg. and 30 mg. - and the usual adult dose is 30 mg. at bedtime.

    Keep in mind that with any sleeping aid - benzodiazepine or otherwise - your reflexes and attention will be affected (meaning that you shouldn't attempt to drive on the drug or do anything else dangerous like operate heavy machines), and you're likely to have a hangover effect the next morning.

    If you want some clinical information on the drug, you'll find it at:

    http://www.mentalhealth.com/drug/p30-r01.html
    http://www.psyweb.com/Drughtm/restoril.html

    And, if you're determined to do it without a prescription, read:

    http://www.urban75.com/Drugs/temazepem.html

    Having said all that, my advice is: Don't fuck with this stuff. First, examine why you're "having trouble falling asleep" - are you keeping strange hours, is anything you might be doing on your cycle affecting your sleep patterns, are you doing any other drugs (like speed) that would keep you awake, are you an ADD'er whose mind tends to race, is there any other problem you're dealing with that's distracting you from sleep, etc.? If you can't determine the cause and believe that you clinically have insomnia, don't sweat it - insomnia is a legitimate medical condition that can be addressed by any doctor.

    As I said, there are newer drugs that can be more effective - Ambien is probably the most common (you may have seen that advertised on television) - drugs that won't cause a hangover effect the next day; won't impair your judgment, reaction time, or ability to drive; and won't result in your mom kicking your ass when she finds out that you raided her prescription stash.

    My advice is to see your doctor, and to be up front with him or her about any AS you've already been using. (Your communications with your doctor must be confidential under the physician-patient relationship, and the doctor cannot even tell your parent about your discussion. But play it safe and make sure the doctor will stick to that.) Let a pro decide what you should (or shouldn't) be taking to help you sleep.

    Finally, if you don't want to see a doctor about this, head over to any GNC or drug store and pick up a bottle of Melatonin. That's a cheap, natural herbal supplement that a lot of people use to help them sleep. It comes in 300 mcg (microgram) strength, and two or three of them should help zonk you out with less of a hangover effect than you'll get from the Temazepam. It's also legal and, just as important, it doesn't belong to someone else.

    If you have any follow-up question, bro, post 'em here. We really are on your side.

  3. #3
    DIGGS is offline New Member
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    I am sad to say that I am 23 and still live at home.No I have not yet started my cycle(sorry from now on I will use proper english) I recently had a foot injurey and was prescribed vicodin ,that was finished yesterday.I was so used to the vicodin puttig me to sleep and now I am sitting here tossing and turning .At this rate I am not going to get any sleep.I appreciate your concern,I am just getting desperate here and will find any means to fall asleep. I found this prescription and looked on the internet for info.I was hoping to find someone here on these great boards that have had some experiance with this drug. DIGGS

  4. #4
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    bigkev is offline Scamming Traitor
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    holy shit tnt! you are the man!

  5. #5
    6pak2go is offline New Member
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    Damn TNT...
    Here you go with the Merck Manual shit again
    I have personal experience with Restoril...(Temazepam)
    Hung me over Like a big dog!!
    Zappped my strength like you wouldnt believe...
    Now occasionally I will use good ole Benadryl
    (Allright TNT dont get me started on my soap box again )
    It seems to help relax... Dries up mucous membranes though which is uncomfortable ..Try a natural alternative (valerian root, ?? cant remember exactly).. of course occasional insomnia is no big deal but if its severe see your doc..

  6. #6
    4plates's Avatar
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    if your having trouble sleeping try a $5 a bottle of nyquil that shit put me down for the count.the big bottle should last you a few days,long enough to make your mind forget about the vicodin or any other prescriptions,that shit is highly addictive so try some simple nyquil bro

  7. #7
    TNT's Avatar
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    TNT is offline Retired Moderator
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    Cool Alright, DIGGS - You've Filled In the Picture!

    Originally posted by DIGGS
    I am sad to say that I am 23 and still live at home.No I have not yet started my cycle(sorry from now on I will use proper english) I recently had a foot injurey and was prescribed vicodin ,that was finished yesterday.I was so used to the vicodin puttig me to sleep and now I am sitting here tossing and turning .At this rate I am not going to get any sleep.I appreciate your concern,I am just getting desperate here and will find any means to fall asleep. I found this prescription and looked on the internet for info.I was hoping to find someone here on these great boards that have had some experiance with this drug. DIGGS
    A-ha (he exclaims)! First of all, DIGGS, don't be "sad to say" that you're still living at home at 23. I lived at home through both college and grad school, and couldn't have foot the tuition bill without it. Besides, you only get one set of parents, and the older you get, the cooler they get - make the most of it.

    Anyway, the cause of your insomnia is obvious - you have just come off of Vicodin, which has heavy-duty tranquilizing effects. (Let's fill in our other readers - Vicodin is a combination of acetominophen and hydocodone (an opiate), and is used for moderate to severe pain. It's similar to Percocet or Tylenol w/Codeine, although Vicodin is usually prescribed for dental pain, say, after a root canal, and the others are usually prescribed for other types of injuries.)

    In addition to functioning as a pain killer, the Vicodin itself was knocking you out. Take away the Vicodin, and it will obviously be more difficult to fall asleep for a while. But this will wear off as your body gets used to not being on Vicodin.

    Also - and don't be concerned about this - Vicodin is highly addictive. Depending on how long you were on it and how often you took it, you may have become addicted to it. No, that doesn't mean that you're an opiate junkie, and a little bit of "addiction lite" is not that terrible if it has occurred while you are in the process of relieving some very serious pain. But realize that your current insomnia is part of the process of getting off the drug, and it will not be with you for the long haul.

    My advice stands - talk to your doctor and see if there's anything that will help you get some more sleep for the short haul, or try the Melatonin (which is a natural supplement), again for the short haul.

    You did not mention if your injury has kept you laid up. If so, and if you've been doing a lot of sleeping during the day because of the Vicodin and the lack of activity, that would also skew your night sleeping routine. Again, the solution is simple (even if it does not seem easy) - try to stay awake during the day, and you'll sleep better at night. Like I said, if you're hanging out at home and bored as shit, staying awake may not be easy, but your regular sleep cycle will be skewed by an abnormal sleep cycle.

    Finally, if you are recovering at home, don't sweat it. Who ever said that you have to sleep at night? In other words, listen to your body - when it's been awake long enough, you'll fall asleep regardless of what time of day it is. Then, once you have recovered and are no longer on Vicodin, your body will return to its natural cycle.

    An be sure to read 6pak2go's post in this thread. The Restoril (Temazepam) is not nearly as strong as the Vicodin, but it can hang you over more than Vicodin. 6pak is right about the Benedryl - it's an antihistamine that can also help you sleep (2 capsules, or a total of 50 mg., will do the trick) and dry your sinuses out at the same time. Keep in mind, however, that any drug you take will skew your cycle somewhat - it may help you fall asleep, but will not help you stay asleep. In other words, there are any number of things ranging from Benedryl to good ol' NyQuil that will kick you into an hour or two of deep sleep, but then you'll be hung over and have difficulty getting back to sleep for a full night's rest.

    Bottom line, DIGGS: Let your body readjust to getting off of the Vicodin. It may take a few more days, but once it's totally out of your system (especially since you just finished it yesterday), you should return to "normal" naturally.

  8. #8
    flexshack is offline Member
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    okay
    Last edited by flexshack; 04-07-2006 at 03:39 AM.

  9. #9
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    Cool Flex's questions . . .

    You're right, flexshack, clonazepam is one of the benzodiazepines. The name brand is Klonopin and, coincidentally, it's made by the same company that makes Valium (Roche Pharmaceuticals). If you want to read some clinical literature, you'll find it at:
    http://www.druginfonet.com/klonopin.htm

    Clonazepam is prescribed for several things, ranging from seizures to panic disorder. You're right, it will leave you a little zonked at times, but a 0.5 mg. dose is generally very safe.

    In most cases, patients take a lot more, which is why clonazepam usually has to be titrated down (discontinued in small steps rather than all at once). There are no significant long-term side effects, but you should periodically monitor your kidney and liver function when on any benzodiazepine (usually an annual blood test will do the trick).

    I wouldn't worry about becoming addicted to it since you're on such a low dose. At some point, you may want to ask your doctor if there's anything else available that might not have the drowsiness side effect, but generally you'll find that your doctor is the most qualified one to decide which medication is best. A lot of that will depend on your individual diagnosis, since not all types of anxiety disorders are the same.

    Now, a little bit of a digression that may be helpful to some . . .

    FWIW, here's a perspective on addiction in general . . . It's a bitch. I worked in an addictions hospital for a year and a half, and any addiction, whether to alcohol, illegal drugs, or legal pharmaceuticals is like a heavy stone around your neck. (Or, in good ol' street slang, a monkey on your back.) However,, the medical profession has learned a lot about addictive substances over the past few years in terms of pain management (especially with regard to cancer patients and people with terminal conditions). And they've been smart enough to move addiction closer to the back burner when the addiction is a side effect of a legitimate use.

    A typical case is Oxycontin, a long-acting release version of oxycodone (an opiate) that has been called the greatest drug since the invention of the wheel when it comes to relieving pain in cancer patients. When Oxycontin is chewed rather than swallowed, it produces a high similar to heroin, and Oxycontin has become the most abused prescription drug over the past few years. That causes controversy, and puts the legitimate users of Oxycontin at risk since the FDA tends to crack down hard in these situations.

    If anyone here is old enough to remember Quaalude, you know what I'm talking about. Ludes, or "714's," were one of the most popular street drugs of the early 70's. They were also a very safe, highly effective sleeping pill made by then-Rorer Pharmaceuticals. But they became so abused that Rorer was pressured to take them off the market, which had a negative effect on patients who were using them legitimately.

    So far, the manufacturer of Oxycontin, Purdue Pharma, has resisted pulling Oxycontin off the market, and they are working with the FDA to engage in a preventive education campaign. Chances are that Oxycontin will not go the same route as Quaalude because cancer patients and persons with terminal illnesses (who tend to be activists) won't let it happen.

    That said, in pain management, doctors have finally begun to address addiction sensibly. Yes, they conclude, addiction is a big bummer. (Well, they don't put it that way, but you get the point.) But in terms of priority, the amelioration of severe pain is more important, and addiction can be dealt with in that context.

    In short, the days are gone when doctors would refuse to give morpheine to a person who was going to die in a day or two because "it would turn them into an addict." Fanatacism has moved aside in favor of compassion and sensibility.

    The bottom line, then, is that if you have a legitimate need to take something that is potentially addictive, whether it is an opiate for pain or a benzodiazepine for anxiety, don't sweat the addiction issue. Just be aware of it, limit what you take if you can, and keep a good line of communication open with your doctor so you can prevent it from going too far and can explore other options if they're available.

    End of latest sermon. We will now pass the plate . . . Um, would you make that a 45 lb. plate? Hell, make it two!

  10. #10
    flexshack is offline Member
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    okay
    Last edited by flexshack; 04-07-2006 at 03:40 AM.

  11. #11
    6pak2go is offline New Member
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    Too-Shay TNT

    Get off the vic's bro...there a bitch

  12. #12
    primodonna is offline Female Member
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    TNT we should just copy all of your posts into the "Hot Topics" Forum...Great info as usual

  13. #13
    killerdice is offline Junior Member
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    That stuff is bunk,, try some Kava Kava,, I take much more that I says on the label,, it helps me fall asleep and I dont wake up with a cloudy head..

  14. #14
    A_Grant is offline Junior Member
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    I have been taking Temazepam 45 mg ED for over 5 years (I have a prescription, my MD gave me over 20 other medication over the years and nothing would do it) and I can assure you I perform a lot better in the gym after a good night of temazepam induced sleep thant after 48 hours without a single shut eyes moment.

    But Temazepam CAN be a very dangerous meedication, and I would strongly advice agains't using even a single dose without your MD consent.

    There are others sleeping aids that you can try ODC (melatonin, valerian, diphenidramine, etc...) or by prescription (trazodone, lyrica, zoplicone, etc...) that will have a safer medication profile.

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    This thread is over 10yrs old, why bump such an old thread
    *Anyone wanting a source check from a willing vet/mod must first acquire 100 posts and 45 days of activity*

    “Carrying a set to a point where you are forced to utilize 100 percent of your momentary ability is the single most important factor in increasing size and strength"--- Mike Mentzer

    “one set to failure is all that is required to stimulate an increase in strength and size – with no number of lesser sets having the same effect” – Mike Mentzer

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