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  1. #1
    Needtobeswoledup is offline Associate Member
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    Blood Pressure ok?

    My blood pressure is 132/81. I am about to start a cycle of t400 and 400mg eq. Should I be worried aobut it being high already and put off the cycle or is it not high enough to worry about?

  2. #2
    Ammar's Avatar
    Ammar is offline Senior Member
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    I dont think you will have a problem but keep a close check on it...if it keeps rising then stop the cycle and go see the doctor. I would even ask a doctor before you start a cycle, there is patient/doctor confidentiality.

  3. #3
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    That pressure is not that high bro. Its a little above avg. but nothing really to worry about. I would start to get concerned if the systolic goes above 140. I know my pressure increases while cycling so I try and monitor it as often as possible. Just keep checking yours and if it increases too much, go see a doc.

  4. #4
    956Vette is offline AR-Elite Hall of Famer
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    youre fine bro. At least you are aware of your blood pressure, most people dont even have a clue.

  5. #5
    Gettin'Old is offline Associate Member
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    What do you do if your blood pressure gets really jacked up while on a cycle? Is this a discontinue immediately situation?

  6. #6
    Needtobeswoledup is offline Associate Member
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    I know i am fine at the moment but also know that on previous cycles blood pressure has gone up. I don't want it to go above 140 on a cycle and have never previously monitored it while on cycle so I don't know by how much it will go up....

  7. #7
    Tock's Avatar
    Tock is offline Anabolic Member
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    First, I'd get my blood pressure checked. Wal-Mart sells home units for around $40 that will do the trick, just make sure you get the one with a LARGE cuff size so it'll go around your arm.

    Second, bp between 130-140 is considered "high normal," and from what I've read, most doctors won't bother prescribing medication. If it goes much above that for extended periods of time, yah, you'll be affecting your internal organs and cardiovascular system . . . the extra pressure puts extra stress on the veins and arteries and etc, they harden and you end up with arterosclurosis (sp?). I suspect that (and keep in mind that I'm no doctor) you won't do too much damage if it goes up to 140-150 for brief periods of time and for only a few times. I wouldn't recommend pushing your luck after that.

    Thirdly, here's something about hypertension I got from
    www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-060.shtml :

    =================================
    A startling statistic in the May 4, 1999, edition of The New York Times revealed that only 18% of people with high blood pressure (hypertension) are successfully treated to achieve normotensive ranges. Untreated hypertension carries enormous health risks, such as increased risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and eye disease, yet fear of medication side effects and improper prescribing by physicians are contributing to an epidemic of hypertension-induced disease.

    "Blood pressure" can be defined as the pressure or force that is applied against the artery walls as blood is carried through the circulatory system. It is recorded as a measurement of this force in relation to the heart's pumping activity, and is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg). The top number, or systolic pressure, is the measurement of the pressure that occurs when the heart contracts or beats. The bottom number, or diastolic pressure, is the measurement recorded between beats, while the heart is at rest. The systolic number is placed over the diastolic number. For example, 110/70 (read as "110 over 70") means a systolic pressure of 110 mmHg and a diastolic pressure of 70 mmHg. The systolic number is always the higher of the two numbers.

    "Hypertension" is an indicator that the force required for blood flow is greater than normal. A blood pressure measurement of less than 130/85 is considered "normal," while 130-140/85-90 is defined as "high normal." A large study reported in the March 1997 issue of the journal Circulation indicates that "even borderline blood pressure readings represent a risk factor for atherosclerosis and stroke." Blood pressure is considered to be elevated when repeated measurement shows a systolic pressure greater than 140, a diastolic pressure greater than 90, or both.

    Because the heart is working harder than normal, high blood pressure increases the risk of coronary heart disease, heart attack, stroke, aneurysm, kidney failure, and atherosclerosis. When the heart works harder than normal over an extended period of time, it tends to enlarge. High blood pressure also causes the arteries and arterioles to become scarred, hardened, and less elastic. This, in turn, can limit the amount of blood flowing to the organs; can cause blood clots in the arteries; and can ultimately damage the heart, brain, and kidneys.

    Disease Cause

    The cause of hypertension is unknown in 90 to 95% of all cases. People who have a family history of high blood pressure may be more likely to suffer from it. People who suffer from stress, worries, fear, pressure from events from daily life, and nervous stress can also suffer from hypertension.

    Because persons with hypertension may not exhibit any symptoms, they often go undiagnosed until complications occur. Regular (yearly) blood- pressure screening can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment and reduce the risk of further complications associated with hypertension.

    Hypertension is generally classified as primary or secondary. Primary or essential hypertension has no known cause; however, certain lifestyle factors such as body weight and salt intake are involved. Ninety-five percent of persons diagnosed with hypertension fall into this category. The diagnosis is made when no other cause is found. Secondary hypertension is caused by some other medical diagnosis or problem, such as kidney disease, Cushing's syndrome, pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, chronic alcohol abuse, or the use of certain medications.

    There are several factors that put people at risk for hypertension. Gender, age, heredity, and race are factors that cannot be controlled. As people age, their chances of developing hypertension increase. Men are generally at greater risk than women. However, as women age, their risk increases with the onset of menopause, and later in life it exceeds that of men. Heredity can be a risk factor if one or more parents have been diagnosed with hypertension. African Americans are at higher risk for contracting hypertension than Caucasians are.

    According to the journal Ethn. Dis., (winter 1998), other risk factors that can be controlled are lifestyle related: obesity, lack of exercise, diet, stress, the use of certain medications, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.

    Disease Symptoms

    Hypertension usually has no evident symptoms. Many people can have high blood pressure for years without knowing it, and that is why it can be so dangerous. The only way a person can find out if he or she has hypertension is to have his or her blood pressure checked at least once every 2 years by a doctor or other health professional. Some of the warning signs of hypertension can include nosebleeds, an irregular heartbeat, headaches, and dizziness; however, if a person does not have these warning signs, it does not necessarily mean he or she does not suffer from it.

    Hypertension can occur in children or adults. It occurs predominantly in middle-aged and elderly people, obese people, heavy drinkers, blacks, and women who are taking oral contraceptives. Called the silent killer, there may not be any symptoms for many years until a vital organ is damaged. A person can be calm and relaxed and still have high blood pressure, even though tension or nervousness also causes hypertension.

    Blood pressure may rise as people get older. Males suffer from hypertension earlier than females and are more likely to develop high blood pressure than females in early adulthood into early middle age. By the time women reach the age of 55, their chances of getting hypertension even out with men. Three fourths of all women past the age of 75 suffer from hypertension.

    Conventional Treatment

    There is no cure for hypertension, but conventional doctors treat it in one or both of two ways: (1) by changing the patient's lifestyle and eating habits and (2) by prescription medications. The change of lifestyle is preferable to taking medication. Alternative doctors seek to address the underlying cause of hypertension and correct it.

    Change in Lifestyle and Eating Habits

    A January 1998 Harvard Medical School study sums up the impact of excess weight or small weight gains relative to the risk of hypertension: "Excess weight and even modest adult weight gain substantially increase risk for hypertension. Weight loss reduces the risk for hypertension."

    An earlier Harvard 1996 study that included 41,541 female nurses, published in Hypertension Journal, stated that "these results support hypotheses that age, body weight, and alcohol consumption are strong determinants of risk of hypertension in middle-aged women. They are compatible with the possibilities that magnesium and fiber as well as a diet richer in fruits and vegetables may reduce blood pressure levels."

    If a person is overweight, or only a little overweight, it is suggested he or she lose weight. Losing 2 pounds can cause a 1 to 2 point drop in blood pressure. Brisk walking or bike riding for 30 to 40 minutes, 3 times a week, can lower blood pressure a few points. Strenuous exercise can lower blood pressure even more. (Also refer to the section "The DASH Diet" in this protocol, for a diet that many people say "requires them to eat too much.")

    Integrated and Alternative Treatments

    A New Rational Approach for Hypertension Therapy

    Several basic concepts are often ignored despite being relevant to the treatment of hypertensive patients and associated cardiovascular disease.

    Although people often consider hypertension as a disease, it is not itself a disease but, rather, one warning manifestation of a disease. Approximately 90% of the time, the underlying cause(s) of hypertension are unknown; thus, the condition itself is named according to its sign, as essential hypertension.

    Commonly, physicians are told that by eliminating the hypertension-i.e., by merely reducing blood pressure-the increased risk and mortality associated with underlying cardiovascular disease will be reversed. Unfortunately, the cumulative experience of over two decades of worldwide clinical trials indicates that getting rid of only one aspect of hypertensive disease, the elevated blood pressure, reduces only part of the cardiovascular risk associated with hypertension.

    We must appreciate that what we call "hypertension" is a powerful indicator of disease in other body systems, such as left ventricular hypertrophy, that may exist prior to and progress independently of the hypertension itself and insulin resistance, reflecting the same underlying pathophysiology in skeletal muscle, fat, and other tissues. Thus, the disease we call hypertension is not just a blood pressure reduction or numbers game. We must consider the treatment of associated disease to treat hypertension successfully.

    Ultimately the goal would be to identify underlying disease-not only the elevation of blood pressure, but also the other multisystemic aspects of hypertensive cardiovascular disease-and implement an integrated medical approach as well. Focusing on such underlying factors would allow treatment of the disease process itself, rather than just the elevated blood pressure.

    A second concept is also often overlooked but quite obvious: people are different. By analogy with an elevated temperature, the same elevation of blood pressure that leads to the diagnosis of "essential" hypertension may result from many different "primary" causes, which just happen to have hypertension as one shared clinical manifestation. This immediately implies that when we ask, "Is this drug or integrated therapy good, or preferred for hypertension?" the answer should be, "It depends." As an obvious example, the salt-sensitive hypertensive patient responds to dietary salt recommendations and to different drug classes differently from an individual who is not salt sensitive.

    Therefore, it is worthwhile to consider associated underlying cardiovascular disease and treatment protocols present in the cardiovascular section of this book when treating hypertension as well as an individual's unique response to various conventional and integrated therapies. Working closely with your physician to monitor your individual response to integrated therapies is recommended.

    There are nutrients that may reduce or eliminate the need for antihypertensive medications. However, nutrients may not work immediately to lower blood pressure the way drugs do, so it is important to carry nutritional blood pressure-lowering therapy through over a period of 4 to 12 weeks. Also, physician cooperation is crucial if you are to reduce your intake of blood pressure-lowering drugs safely. Routine, ongoing blood pressure monitoring is mandatory to determine whether the nutritional or integrated medical regimen you are following is controlling or reducing your blood pressure or not.

    < s n i p >

    I Snipped the section on nutritional helps to lower blood pressure, you can go to the site and check it out, but be forewarned they are selling a lot of the stuff they say is good for blood pressure. The other info is pretty good, though . . .

  8. #8
    ichabodcrane's Avatar
    ichabodcrane is offline Associate Member
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    Bro, you are sitting fine. Your pressure is very good. I bet most people's on this board is not even that good. But when you start, just keep check on it. Buy a home monitor, like mentioned above, and monitor a few days/week. Keep a log. This will let you know where you stand, and you can make the appropriate decision accordingly. I know (this is for me as well), that alot of people use a bp med when their bp gets high. This is one factor you can control, so why stop a good cycle if your bp gets high, when you have the means to keep it under control? You'll be fine. Just keep check on it. It would be safe to expect an increase while on cycle. But how much is an individual thing as well as a "what type of AAS you are using" thing.

  9. #9
    Gettin'Old is offline Associate Member
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    Along these same lines, is it normal (or unusual) for one to have a more rapid heartbeat on cycle? How high can you go before this gets dangerous?

    Thanks.

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by Gettin'Old
    Along these same lines, is it normal (or unusual) for one to have a more rapid heartbeat on cycle? How high can you go before this gets dangerous?

    Thanks.
    Normal resting heart rate for an adult is between 60-100 bpm. To get the most accurate reading its best to take it in the A.M. before any activity. If your taking any stimulants or thermogenic type supplements your HR, BP, and body temp will increase. Its always smart to start off with a minimal dose and as your body builds a tolerance to the substance you increase it accordingly. A HR above 100 is considered tachycardic, meaning thats it above normal. I really never exp. an increase in HR while cycling, but then again, everyone reacts differently.

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