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Thread: Vitamin B12

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    Peter's Avatar
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    Vitamin B12

    What do you guys think about Vitamin B12? I just recieved a bottle. Can I mix it in the same syringe as test and deca ? And what are the dosages of the B12?
    -Pete

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter
    What do you guys think about Vitamin B12? I just recieved a bottle. Can I mix it in the same syringe as test and deca ? And what are the dosages of the B12?
    -Pete
    BTW I am 21 yrs old 6''3 200 lbs. I will be starting my 2nd cycle on Dec 1. I was planning on injecting the B12 Sub-V and mixing it with my HCG . Can this be done since they are both h2o based? Also how much b12 is sufficient?
    -Pete

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    bump

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    KeyMastur is offline VET
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    wow you don't have much patience do you ??

    anyways, yes, you can mix it in the same syringe and inject IM.

  5. #5
    KeyMastur is offline VET
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    i forgot the name of the guy who originally posted all of this info, but it's on his site (either you know him or you don't)

    Introduction
    Vitamin B12 is a member of the vitamin B complex. It contains cobalt, and so is also known as cobalamin. It is exclusively synthesised by bacteria and is found primarily in meat, eggs http://www.vegsoc.org/info/laying.html and dairy products http://www.vegsoc.org/info/cattle.html. There has been considerable research into proposed plant sources of vitamin B12. Fermented soya products http://www.vegsoc.org/info/soya.html seaweeds, and algae such as spirulina have all been suggested as containing significant B12. However, the present consensus is that any B12 present in plant foods is likely to be unavailable to humans and so these foods should not be relied upon as safe sources. Many vegan http://www.vegsoc.org/info/vegan-nutrition.html foods are supplemented with B12. Vitamin B12 is necessary for the synthesis of red blood cells, the maintenance of the nervous system, and growth and development in children http://www.vegsoc.org/info/childre1.html. Deficiency can cause anaemia. Vitamin B12 neuropathy, involving the degeneration of nerve fibres and irreversible neurological damage, can also occur.


    Functions
    Vitamin B12's primary functions are in the formation of red blood cells and the maintenence of a healthy nervous system. B12 is necessary for the rapid synthesis of DNA during cell division. This is especially important in tissues where cells are dividing rapidly, particularly the bone marrow tissues responsible for red blood cell formation. This is important for muscle tissue growth.If B12 deficiency occurs, DNA production is disrupted and abnormal cells called megaloblasts occur. This results in anaemia. Symptoms include excessive tiredness, breathlessness, listlessness, pallor, and poor resistance to infection. Other symptoms can include a smooth, sore tongue and menstrual disorders. Anaemia may also be due to folic acid deficiency, folic acid also being necessary for DNA synthesis. B12 is also important in maintaining the nervous system. Nerves are surrounded by an insulating fatty sheath comprised of a complex protein http://www.vegsoc.org/info/protein.html called myelin. B12 plays a vital role in the metabolism of fatty acids essential for the maintainence of myelin. Prolonged B12 deficiency can lead to nerve degeneration and irreversible neurological damage. When deficiency occurs, it is more commonly linked to a failure to effectively absorb B12 from the intestine rather than a dietary deficiency. Absorption of B12 requires the secretion from the cells lining the stomach of a glycoprotein, known as intrinsic factor. The B12-intrinsic factor complex is then absorbed in the ileum (part of the small intestine) in the presence of calcium http://www.vegsoc.org/info/calcium.html Certain people are unable to produce intrinsic factor and the subsequent pernicious anaemia is treated with injections of B12. Vitamin B12 can be stored in small amounts by the body. Total body store is 2-5mg in adults. Around 80% of this is stored in the liver. Vitamin B12 is excreted in the bile and is effectively reabsorbed. This is known as enterohepatic circulation. The amount of B12 excreted in the bile can vary from 1 to 10ug (micrograms) a day. People on diets low in B12, including vegans http://www.vegsoc.org/info/vegan-nutrition.html and some vegetarians, may be obtaining more B12 from reabsorption than from dietary sources. Reabsorption is the reason it can take over 20 years for deficiency disease to develop in people changing to diets absent in B12. In comparison, if B12 deficiency is due to a failure in absorption it can take only 3 years for deficiency disease to occur. B12 has very low toxicity and high intakes are not thought to be dangerous.

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    Vitamin B 12, known as cyanocobalamin, cobolamin and also known as the energy vitamin is a very widely researched vitamin, and used in supplementation to a very large degree. This complex structured compound with its cobalt content forms part of the B group vitamins.

    Vitamin B12 - cyanocobamin - is required for
    Cobolamin is needed in the manufacture of red blood cells and the maintenance of red blood cells and it stimulates appetite, promotes growth and release energy. It is often used with older people to give an energy boost, assist in preventing mental deterioration and helps with speeding up thought processes. Some people are also of the opinion that it helps with clearing up infections and provide protection against allergies and cancer. This vitamin is also used in the metabolism of fats, proteins and carbohydrates.

    Deficiency of vitamin B12
    Some symptoms of a deficiency will include a sore tongue, weakness, fatigue, and weight loss, back pain and apathy. It might further result in loss of balance, decreased reflexes, tingling of the fingers, ringing in the ears etc. A deficiency may also result in the raising of the level of homocysteine in the blood - which in high doses can be toxic to the brain, which may be involved in Alzheimer disease. Severe deficiency may result in pernicious anemia also called Addisonian pernicious anemia.
    Another problem that appears in deficiency is the eroding of the myelin sheath - the fatty sheath of tissue, which insulates the nerve fibers in your body.


    Dosage
    The dosage underneath is the Recommended Dietary Allowance http://www.anyvitamins.com/rda.htm(RDA), but be aware that this dosage is the minimum that you require per day, to ward off serious deficiency of this particular nutrient. In the therapeutic use of this nutrient, the dosage is usually increased considerably, but the toxicity level must be kept in mind. Male and female 3 mcg per day. Toxicity and symptoms of high intake. Toxicity not established but people taking vitamin B12 injections may experience skin problems if in large excess, but will normalize once the injections are stopped.


    Best used with
    Iron, calcium, sodium, potassium as well as vitamin C are good in nutritional synergy. When more may be required
    People on strict vegan and macrobiotic diets are often deficient on Vitamin B12. Some people suffer from a potentially serious problem, causing the vitamin not to be absorbed in the intestinal tract, which can lead to pernicious (destructive) anemia. Anybody consuming alcohol should look at their B12 levels or if you take laxatives or antacids regularly.
    Older people could also benefit from this vitamin as the intestinal situation changes as you age, and many people older than sixty have difficulty extracting the vitamin from ingested food since the correct stomach acids are not present. Enemy of vitamin B12 - excessive alcohol can impair the absorption of this vitamin.


    Other interesting points
    Vitamin B12 can not be manufactured by any plants, and therefore is only found in animal products - therefore a deficiency may happens to people on a strict vegan diet. Unlike other water-soluble vitamins, B12 needs some 3 hours to be absorbed where other B vitamins are absorbed nearly immediately.

    Food sources of vitamin B12
    Vitamin B12 is present in liver, organ meat, muscle meat, shellfish, eggs, cheese, fish, and can be manufactured in the body. Although milk contains B12, processing of milk may lead to destruction of the vitamin.

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    Vitamin B12 and the metabolic rate

    Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is naturally found in food such as fish, milk and milk products, eggs, meat and poultry. Fortified breakfast cereals are another source of vitamin B12 and a valuable source for vegetarians. Vitamin B12 is important for good health, necessary for the proper digestion and absorption of foods and for normal metabolism of carbohydrates, and fat. It helps maintain healthy nerve cells and red blood cells and is needed to make DNA. Vitamin B12 is bound to the protein in food. Hydrochloric acid in the stomach releases B12 from protein during digestion. Vitamin B12 was isolated from a liver extracted in 1948 and identified as the nutritional factor in liver that prevented pernicious anemia, a deadly type of anemia characterized by large, immature red blood cells. In order to absorb the small amounts of vitamin B12 found in food, the stomach secretes intrinsic factor, a special digestive secretion that increases the absorption of vitamin B12 in the small intestine. Unlike other water-soluble nutrients, vitamin B12 is stored in the liver, kidney, and other body tissues. It can take several years before signs of the deficiency appear, all because of poor dietary intake. Vitamin B12 functions as a "methyl donor." A methyl donor is a compound that carries and donates methyl groups to other molecules, including cell membrane components and neurotransmitters. As a methyl donor vitamin B12 is involved in homocysteine metabolism and plays a critical role in proper energy metabolism, immune function, and nerve function. Therefore, vitamin B12 is clearly an added benefit for anyone wanting to lose weight, as without it, metabolism is not at its peak potential.
    Dosing for vitamin B12 is dependent on the age of the individual as well as if the patient is pregnant or lactating. Vitamin B12 is necessary in only very small quantities No one has ever reported clear toxicity from vitamin B12.

  6. #6
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    Great post Key... LET UM KNOW

  7. #7
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    Well thats all there is to know, great info.

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