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  1. #1
    yannick32's Avatar
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    Talking Finaly got to talk with someone that trained MMA and Jiu Jitsu

    Last night we went out me girlfriend and her friends.

    I met a guy that trained thai jitsu style was very interesting.

    He says that after 1 minute of jiu jitsu training he was already sweating heavy and is GI was soak and wet. He says that Jui Jistu is pertty hard the one based on street fighting.

    I cant wait to get back in to action.

    He says that the sparring in jiu jitsu is really hard, to put someone in an arm bar or leg lock using techic is easy but sparring is a whole different world.

  2. #2
    Nikolaus777's Avatar
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    you want to train ju jitsu or mma or all of em?

    Just call your girlfriend a hooker after she's had a few beers and the ground game workout is on!

  3. #3
    yannick32's Avatar
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    Nikolaus777 i will have to shop around for schools very soon, i would like to learn everything, ground, stand up but the school i visited isnt quit well structured, the guy doesnt seem to know where he is going and thats what really got me off about that school.

    Actually my girlfriend would be interested in martial arts so that would be pertty cool if we can do the same classes.

  4. #4
    iwillsleepwhenidie's Avatar
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    I have been training MMA now for about 6 months since my baseball career has ended. It is the best thing i ever did i train 6 days a week. Really makes lifting heavy weights hard though, and your friend was right in sparring it is very difficult to put a submission lock on. The more you do it the easier it is though.

  5. #5
    Gracie fighter is offline New Member
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    I Have been training In Gracie Jiu jitsu for 10 years. it is a truly effective martial art for self defense

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gracie fighter
    I Have been training In Gracie Jiu jitsu for 10 years. it is a truly effective martial art for self defense
    Could you please explain what a beginner class would be like?

  7. #7
    crag is offline New Member
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    Generally grappling sports are warm up,(standard sports style, running around, pulse rate up, a bity of callisthenics, sports specific movement then stretches).

    Then tecchnique practice and drills to learn moves, and the second half is free sparring with opponents.

    For beginners they may get you sparring on your first night, with the one or two moves they have shown you in the first half. No need to panic, they want you to keep coming back, so things will be simple and safe- just very exhausting!

    On that note for bodybuilders or strongmen, don't waste all your strength in the first minute, and don't hold your breath when you are straining. You will enjoy the first class a lot more.

    Karl.

  8. #8
    AMERBOY is offline New Member
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    been training jiu jitsu for 4 yrs now,nothing like it.the training the people you meet nothing compares.where do you live if your in socal i train at gracie barra.you really cant get better than that.

  9. #9
    simm's Avatar
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    Yannick32..R u in the uk? If so what district?let me know and i will search out a good mma or martial arts club for u ok?

  10. #10
    GQ-Bouncer's Avatar
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    You've never trained? I'm surprised, your active on this forum

    a fightclub always has good, standup guys, i'd go as far as to say their are alot of rolemodels there.

    You'll start out with a warmup & stretch. then you will learn and practice 2-3 diffrent moves that all connect together (Elbow escape followed by a foot sweep are pretty common). and then the most important part of class "Randori" (sp?).. which is sparring

    Remember the golden rule - DONT FVCKING GO HARD, newguys are the most dangerous people to work with (and if your a new guy, you probably just thought to your self as you were reading this "pishh, fvck safety, go hard or go home!!" .... trust me on this, you'll thank me later, relax and fight with your intelligence

  11. #11
    Papi93's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GQ-Bouncer
    You've never trained? I'm surprised, your active on this forum

    a fightclub always has good, standup guys, i'd go as far as to say their are alot of rolemodels there.

    You'll start out with a warmup & stretch. then you will learn and practice 2-3 diffrent moves that all connect together (Elbow escape followed by a foot sweep are pretty common). and then the most important part of class "Randori" (sp?).. which is sparring

    Remember the golden rule - DONT FVCKING GO HARD, newguys are the most dangerous people to work with (and if your a new guy, you probably just thought to your self as you were reading this "pishh, fvck safety, go hard or go home!!" .... trust me on this, you'll thank me later, relax and fight with your intelligence
    Not sure if you were responding to my question. I have trained in traditional Tae Kwon Do and olympic-style Tae Kwon Do/Hapkido. I can explain the structure of TKD classes but do not have experience with the structure of Muay Thai, Wrestling, or Jiu-Jitsu classes. Looking for a good Muay Thai school (in Wisconsin, unfortunately, after I get my black belt in olympic-style TKD.

  12. #12
    GQ-Bouncer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by striker93
    Not sure if you were responding to my question. I have trained in traditional Tae Kwon Do and olympic-style Tae Kwon Do/Hapkido. I can explain the structure of TKD classes but do not have experience with the structure of Muay Thai, Wrestling, or Jiu-Jitsu classes. Looking for a good Muay Thai school (in Wisconsin, unfortunately, after I get my black belt in olympic-style TKD.
    lol, sorry dude i should've been more clear

    my comment was directed towards yannick

  13. #13
    BOUNCER is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by striker93
    . I have trained in traditional Tae Kwon Do and olympic-style Tae Kwon Do/Hapkido.
    Hapkido is not an lympic sport.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOUNCER
    Hapkido is not an lympic sport.
    I meant for it to say Olympic Tae Kwon Do. The school that I train at also teaches Hapkido, that's why added it behind Olympic Tae Kwon Do. Sorry if I mislead anyone.

  15. #15
    BOUNCER is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by striker93
    I meant for it to say Olympic Tae Kwon Do. The school that I train at also teaches Hapkido, that's why added it behind Olympic Tae Kwon Do. Sorry if I mislead anyone.
    Nah its cool, I was 'nit picking', my apologises.

  16. #16
    sonar1234's Avatar
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    I trained tkd for 7 years did karate shotokan for 6 months when i went into competition i could not beleive the dumb point system was just not for me, then i train kyokushin for a year and a half.

    I wanna get back into martial arts at 33, stopped for 10 years, i wrestled for an independant federation here in Monteal where i met a guy that did teach me some MMA, showed me the basic takedowns, armbar and more.

    I also trained in boxing for 6 months when i was 28.

    Main goal is to get back into shape and lose a bit of weight, i am 200 pounds and my bodyfat is around 12% now but with back pain losing weight will help my cause.

    Say 175-180 pounds by this January.

  17. #17
    sonar1234's Avatar
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    Cutting out all junk food and working on cutting out sugar really makes one hell of a difference in the way you look.

    Changing girlfriend too from a small 4 feet 11 chubby lard a$$ to a 5 feet 6 120 pounds active girlfriend who pays attention to what she eats will also do the trick.

    I never ate so many damn veggies in my whole life, salade, veggie juice, smoothies....

  18. #18
    Heywood Jablome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by striker93
    Not sure if you were responding to my question. I have trained in traditional Tae Kwon Do and olympic-style Tae Kwon Do/Hapkido. I can explain the structure of TKD classes but do not have experience with the structure of Muay Thai, Wrestling, or Jiu-Jitsu classes. Looking for a good Muay Thai school (in Wisconsin, unfortunately, after I get my black belt in olympic-style TKD.
    Having traines BJJ, Muay Thai and Wrestling I think I can help here.

    Since you will be a beginner I'll tell you how my school ran the beginner BJJ classes. First we'd start with warmups, these consisted of hipping out drills, practicing your shot, front and back rolls. Then lessons would begin. Each section of the lesson would build on the other, we'd learn a particular sequence we'd each practice it on our training partner at varying degrees of resistance. After a few minutes of practice we'd learn the counter and practice that. We'd keep addind techniques in this manner after the lesson was complete we would then spar starting from the position of the lesson we were working in. After a few minutes of sparring the class was over and during the 15 minute break between classes we'd 'roll' which is what we called sparring where we'd begin grappling from either our knees or a seated position. This is where the intensity rises because you are trying to apply your techniques on your partner and they are trying to do the same with you.

    With beginner Muay Thai we'd start with three three minute rounds of jumping rope and during the minute rest. During the minute rest between jumping rope we do situps and pushups. After the three three minute rounds of jumping rope we do three more three minute rounds of shadow boxing where we concentrated on footwork and form. Then we'd go in to our lesson where we actually learned our techniques. After the lesson we would either rotate through skill stations or do light sparring. The skill stations like heavy bag, speed bag, thai pads, focus mits, etc were rotated through every three minutes and we'd try to focus on form, power and number of reps.

    For wrestling we's start with stretching, running laps, and shots. Then we pummelled and had takedown drills where we'd try to take down our training partner using a shot. They in turn would try to sprawl and defeat your takedown attempt. We'd alternate - then we'd have lessons on wrestling for MMA. These focused on taking your opponent down to a favorable position or avoiding a takedown attempt.

    Hope that helps.

  19. #19
    Gmill13's Avatar
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    I just started training JUDO at Jimmy Pedros DOJO. I want to learn takedown and throws from the clinch and armlocks. First time I ever wore a GI, 45 minutes into the class I was drenched in sweat and got nasty motion sickness from being thrown. The class was very active and I threw up afterwords. Definatly a workout. Im thinking of also joining a bjj club soon for my other 2 off days.

  20. #20
    Papi93's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heywood Jablome
    Having traines BJJ, Muay Thai and Wrestling I think I can help here.

    Since you will be a beginner I'll tell you how my school ran the beginner BJJ classes. First we'd start with warmups, these consisted of hipping out drills, practicing your shot, front and back rolls. Then lessons would begin. Each section of the lesson would build on the other, we'd learn a particular sequence we'd each practice it on our training partner at varying degrees of resistance. After a few minutes of practice we'd learn the counter and practice that. We'd keep addind techniques in this manner after the lesson was complete we would then spar starting from the position of the lesson we were working in. After a few minutes of sparring the class was over and during the 15 minute break between classes we'd 'roll' which is what we called sparring where we'd begin grappling from either our knees or a seated position. This is where the intensity rises because you are trying to apply your techniques on your partner and they are trying to do the same with you.

    With beginner Muay Thai we'd start with three three minute rounds of jumping rope and during the minute rest. During the minute rest between jumping rope we do situps and pushups. After the three three minute rounds of jumping rope we do three more three minute rounds of shadow boxing where we concentrated on footwork and form. Then we'd go in to our lesson where we actually learned our techniques. After the lesson we would either rotate through skill stations or do light sparring. The skill stations like heavy bag, speed bag, thai pads, focus mits, etc were rotated through every three minutes and we'd try to focus on form, power and number of reps.

    For wrestling we's start with stretching, running laps, and shots. Then we pummelled and had takedown drills where we'd try to take down our training partner using a shot. They in turn would try to sprawl and defeat your takedown attempt. We'd alternate - then we'd have lessons on wrestling for MMA. These focused on taking your opponent down to a favorable position or avoiding a takedown attempt.

    Hope that helps.
    Thanks for the info.! What did your schedule look like at this school? You must of put a lot of training time in.

  21. #21
    Heywood Jablome's Avatar
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    5 Days a week at least, usually 6 with just a sparring day on either Saturday or Sunday.

    There were days I would traing BJJ and Muay Thai on the same day with Sparring. It was brutal because I was still lifting too.

  22. #22
    jiggy is offline New Member
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    bjj is hard.. and takes alot of will to do.. there r alot of fans but not alot of practioners becauseof this.. i am under a gracie, dont want to say any names.. i also train muay thai, wrestling, boxing, savate, some jeet kune do and some filipino martial arts.. muay thai is the hardest on ur body cuz it is an offensive style.. basically if u get hit, u eat it and throw a harder strike in return.. but bjj is definately the most demanding and it really tests your will power..

  23. #23
    GQ-Bouncer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jiggy
    bjj is hard.. and takes alot of will to do.. there r alot of fans but not alot of practioners becauseof this.. i am under a gracie, dont want to say any names.. i also train muay thai, wrestling, boxing, savate, some jeet kune do and some filipino martial arts.. muay thai is the hardest on ur body cuz it is an offensive style.. basically if u get hit, u eat it and throw a harder strike in return.. but bjj is definately the most demanding and it really tests your will power..
    ...wow... you practice all those arts at once?

  24. #24
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    Arent there any blocks in muay Thai? i mean there are so many counter attacks?

    I know that when fighting the elbows are not allowed at least over her in Canada, and you are padded with head gear and more..

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