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  1. #1
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    What style of grappling should I choose for my bodytype

    I am 6 feet tall and 275 pounds in good shape.

    I am currently trying jiu jitsu.

    I like the class pretty good but i sometimes feel this is more for the smaller thin and flexible type.

    Would I be better off in judo or some form of wrestling?

    I am wanting to get into a few MMA shows.

  2. #2
    BOUNCER is offline Retired Vet
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    I've never done any wrestling so I can't advise you there. But you won't find much difference Judo (if its a good club with plenty of grappling) and JJ. I weight close to your weight and fight Judo. You'll find it has far better take down's than JJ, but if your thinking of getting into MMA I'd go with a good Vale Tudo club. I've been training in Vale Tudo for the last few months and my judo ground game has really come onlong. Don't forget that neither Judo or JJ will prepare you for a no-Gi competition like MMA.

  3. #3
    billy_ba's Avatar
    billy_ba is offline Associate Member
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    no gi sub wrestling is the way to go. like bouncer said, neither jj or judo will prepare you for mma like no gi. Focus on staying on top and focus on obtaining position rather than going for moves that may be difficult for you. In mma, it's all about position. Obtaining a position and being able to control your opponent will lead to submission either by strikes or subs.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy_ba
    no gi sub wrestling is the way to go. like bouncer said, neither jj or judo will prepare you for mma like no gi. Focus on staying on top and focus on obtaining position rather than going for moves that may be difficult for you. In mma, it's all about position. Obtaining a position and being able to control your opponent will lead to submission either by strikes or subs.

    I agree, it is all about positioning. That is what I try to focus on in my jiu jitsu class...passing gurad and maintaing the mount and than working for practical submissions....not all those fancy ones they try to show you.

    I believe I have a good jiu jitsu instructor, he is from RIo and has been on the mat with some gracies and vitor belfort. But he insists on using the gi.

    Dont the Gracies train with the gi?

  5. #5
    crag is offline New Member
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    There has been a swing back towards training in the gi, even for no gi and some MMA comps. For example a large amount of guys at the ADCC championships said they were training with a gi whenever they could. This might be a fad. I personally don't see any advanatge in it.I do greco and no one I know trains in long clothes to get better at greco...

    As to your body type, how strong are you for your size?

    Karl.

  6. #6
    Heywood Jablome's Avatar
    Heywood Jablome is offline New Member
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    I would think you'd want to bring up your Greco at your height and weight. You'll still have to study BJJ to learn to avoid subs, but if you could be in an upper body clinch and take your opponent down and be on top you'd be hard to handle.

    I would think at your height and weight you wouldn't want to be shooting a lot for the take down. If you work some boxing and Muay Thai in their you could be a standing fighter that can inflict punishment from the clinch with knees and could in the same clinch take an opponent down. Use your boxing to close the distance work a clinch and inflict damage.

  7. #7
    crag is offline New Member
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    Probably try them all and see how they feel. As mentioned Greco is good and can be applied to almost anything , even pure boxing (for clinches).

    The big advantage of BJJ is it is easy to learn and apply, and you can keep getting better and better at a continual rate.

    Timing and balance are less complicated issues lying down, as opposed to moving around on the feet.

    For these reasons Greco and judo is sort of like boxing in that you can learn some devestating basics in short time also, however if you wanted to make this sport your ''expert choice', you really have to devote time to get to 'the next level'.



    Karl.
    Last edited by crag; 08-22-2005 at 06:32 AM.

  8. #8
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    craneboy is offline Senior Member
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    if you can find a Gracie jui jitsu school in your area they train with no gi and include boxing and kickboxing. they pretty much are an MMA school

  9. #9
    ahammer86 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by catabolic kid
    I am 6 feet tall and 275 pounds in good shape.

    I am currently trying jiu jitsu.

    I like the class pretty good but i sometimes feel this is more for the smaller thin and flexible type.

    Would I be better off in judo or some form of wrestling?

    I am wanting to get into a few MMA shows.
    hey man i live over in st pete and i know a place that does submission grappling and wrestling. do you train at tampa gracie barra w/ eduardo de lima off of hillsbourogh ave?

  10. #10
    Glock-19 is offline Banned
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    Its good to know some Jui Jitsu because you will learn to stay out of trouble against other JJ fighters if you compete. JJ seems to be the most efffective fighting style in MMA today. I come from a wrestling background but when I mixed some basic JJ skills with my wrestling it sent me to a whole different level.

  11. #11
    Hunter's Avatar
    Hunter is offline Grateful
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    Val tudo is a great idea mentioned by bouncer. If you can cross train that would be really great to. Like if a local highschool is around with a wrestling program go to a few practices and mix in some BJJ. If you can do Judo to that would be really great if not when spring/summer rolls around you can roll with summer wrestlers who do Greco (similiraties to Judo). I hope this helped

  12. #12
    Pinum's Avatar
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    Things that matter

    Based on 25yrs of wrestling and JJ experience I think a big man should combine as many skills as possible and that being said...Wrestling will teach control and intensity, with unbeatable take downs. JJ will teach submissions and more importantly to you good defense. You will find ground and pound a little easier and many Jui Jitsu guys your size play it that way. Daniel Gracie trains at Renzo's in NYC and he is about your size he might be a good guy to watch. He's real big and fights from the top quite a bit. Now there's big guy's like Rolles Gracie who likes guard but he is 6'4", lean, and flexible, so if your flexible you can work submissions a little more. Height is also a plus for submissions. As far as stand up personally I like Muy Thai as it provides for great power and works the clinch, which once tired, works great. As far as the gi goes I perfer to train without one but it WILL make your defense much stronger. It slows the game down a bit but that's because if you make a possition mistake you will pay. There is little chance of powering out of bad situation. The last thing you need to work takedowns! Takedowns from a wrestler reguardless of what your doing will be important and are probably the hardest thing to learn with proficency. Spend time on your feet in Ju Jitsu there is too much emphasis on just grappling find a wrestler and train this will take years not months. I run a wrestling club and rarely do MMA guys come in and it's a huge mistake. Good luck with your training and give anything you do a least a couple of years. After that you'll see huge improvements.

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