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Thread: twitching

  1. #1
    VIXI's Avatar
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    twitching

    So I realize I may be a little dehydrated as I've been experiencing some muscle twitching...lately it's been in my arms alot...but is it noraml to go as far as experiencing a tingling...almost to the extent of feeling numb?...and no I'm not sitting on my hand...going to increase my water intake...only other changes I've made are new protein shake...Muscle Milk mocha joe(good stuff)...and almost done with my var cycle 10 mg. a day...taking a multi...flax seed and milk thistle...am I missing something?

  2. #2
    eggplant's Avatar
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    i guess its just electrolyte unbalance..more water is key, i've experienced it many times too..

  3. #3
    MMC78's Avatar
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    Low Sodium V8 replenishes most electrolytes without too much salt-bloat.

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    yeah...i should probably bring down my sodium level too...i eat sunflower seeds like a mad woman...

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    quit smoking weed

  6. #6
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    i don't smoke regularly...maybe once or twice a week...if that...maybe it's the angel dust that's makin me gig out...j/k

  7. #7
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    maybe smoke more, your having withdrawls

  8. #8
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    hmmmm...where is that pipe...?

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    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    Yeah, up your water a bit, try a potassium supplement a.m./p.m. to counter-balance the salt levels in the body. Magnesium is actually the best for muscle cramps, despite what many think about potassium being #1 on this list.

    ~SC~

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    tonight is offline Junior Member
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    ditto on increasing the potassium & magnesium to get rid of the cramps. Peanuts have lots of magnesium & meat will give you lots of potassium

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwoleCat
    Magnesium is actually the best for muscle cramps, despite what many think about potassium being #1 on this list.
    Nice little nugget of info. Thanks SC.

  12. #12
    ttuPrincess Guest
    I get twitching when I cut my carbs..

  13. #13
    alabama is offline Associate Member
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    i have it in my fave i thought it was beacause i was tryin to pop one of them boil tpye acne bumps u get from gear like this one lil spot has been twitchin for 2 days now really gettin on my nerves

  14. #14
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    You haven't started clen yet, right?

  15. #15
    Mu'min is offline Associate Member
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    Thanks, guys. My right rear delt has been twitching on my like a madman. Annoying as hell.

  16. #16
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    What about itching??? I got an itch that needs scratching...lol

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwoleCat


    Yeah, up your water a bit, try a potassium supplement a.m./p.m. to counter-balance the salt levels in the body. Magnesium is actually the best for muscle cramps, despite what many think about potassium being #1 on this list.

    ~SC~
    Yeah I agree about the magnesium. I have a magnesium deficiency and take quite a high dosage daily. Also, working out, caffine and alcohol all contribute to a loss of magnesium. Make sure you are taking in enought calcium too cause calcium & magnesium work hand and hand in absorbtion.

  18. #18
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    Muscle spasms and cramps are spontaneous, often painful muscle contractions.


    Description



    Most people are familiar with the sudden pain of a muscle cramp. The rapid, uncontrolled contraction, or spasm, happens unexpectedly, with either no stimulation or some trivially small one. The muscle contraction and pain last for several minutes, and then slowly ease. Cramps may affect any muscle, but are most common in the calves, feet, and hands. While painful, they are harmless, and in most cases, not related to any underlying disorder. Nonetheless, cramps and spasms can be manifestations of many neurological or muscular diseases.


    The terms cramp and spasm can be somewhat vague, and they are sometimes used to include types of abnormal muscle activity other than sudden painful contraction. These include stiffness at rest, slow muscle relaxation, and spontaneous contractions of a muscle at rest (fasciculation). Fasciculation is a type of painless muscle spasm, marked by rapid, uncoordinated contraction of many small muscle fibers. A critical part of diagnosis is to distinguish these different meanings and to allow the patient to describe the problem as precisely as possible.


    Causes and symptoms





    Causes

    Normal voluntary muscle contraction begins when electrical signals are sent from the brain through the spinal cord along nerve cells called motor neurons. These include both the upper motor neurons within the brain and the lower motor neurons within the spinal cord and leading out to the muscle. At the muscle, chemicals released by the motor neuron stimulate the internal release of calcium ions from stores within the muscle cell. These calcium ions then interact with muscle proteins within the cell, causing the proteins (actin and myosin) to slide past one another. This motion pulls their fixed ends closer, thereby shortening the cell and, ultimately, the muscle itself. Recapture of calcium and unlinking of actin and myosin allows the muscle fiber to relax.


    Abnormal contraction may be caused by abnormal activity at any stage in this process. Certain mechanisms within the brain and the rest of the central nervous system help regulate contraction. Interruption of these mechanisms can cause spasm. Motor neurons that are overly sensitive may fire below their normal thresholds. The muscle membrane itself may be over sensitive, causing contraction without stimulation. Calcium ions may not be recaptured quickly enough, causing prolonged contraction.


    Interuption of brain mechanisms and overly sensitive motor neurons may result from damage to the nerve pathways. Possible causes include stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, neurodegenerative diseases, trauma, spinal cord injury, and nervous system poisons such as strychnine, tetanus, and certain insecticides. Nerve damage may lead to a prolonged or permanent muscle shortening called contracture.


    Changes in muscle responsiveness may be due to or associated with:


    Prolonged exercise. Curiously, relaxation of a muscle actually requires energy to be expended. The energy is used to recapture calcium and to unlink actin and myosin. Normally, sensations of pain and fatigue signal that it is time to rest. Ignoring or overriding those warning signals can lead to such severe energy depletion that the muscle cannot be relaxed, causing a cramp. The familiar advice about not swimming after a heavy meal, when blood flow is directed away from the muscles, is intended to avoid this type of cramp. Rigor mortis, the stiffness of a corpse within the first 24 hours after death, is also due to this phenomenon.
    Dehydration and salt depletion. This may be brought on by protracted vomiting or diarrhea, or by copious sweating during prolonged exercise, especially in high temperatures. Loss of fluids and salts--especially sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium--can disrupt ion balances in both muscle and nerves. This can prevent them from responding and recovering normally, and can lead to cramp.
    Metabolic disorders that affect the energy supply in muscle. These are inherited diseases in which particular muscle enzymes are deficient. They include deficiencies of myophosphorylase (McArdle's disease), phosphorylase b kinase, phosphofructokinase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase.
    Myotonia. This causes stiffness due to delayed relaxation of the muscle, but does not cause the spontaneous contraction usually associated with cramps. However, many patients with myotonia do experience cramping from exercise. Symptoms of myotonia are often worse in the cold. Myotonias include myotonic dystrophy, myotonia congenita, paramyotonia congenita, and neuromyotonia.
    Fasciculations may be due to fatigue, cold, medications, metabolic disorders, nerve damage, or neurodegenerative disease, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Most people experience brief, mild fasciculations from time to time, usually in the calves.




    Symptoms

    The pain of a muscle cramp is intense, localized, and often debilitating Coming on quickly, it may last for minutes and fade gradually. Contractures develop more slowly, over days or weeks, and may be permanent if untreated. Fasciculations may occur at rest or after muscle contraction, and may last several minutes.


    Diagnosis



    Abnormal contractions are diagnosed through a careful medical history, physical and neurological examination, and electromyography of the affected muscles. Electromyography records electrical activity in the muscle during rest and movement.


    Treatment



    Most cases of simple cramps require no treatment other than patience and stretching. Gently and gradually stretching and massaging the affected muscle may ease the pain and hasten recovery.


    More prolonged or regular cramps may be treated with drugs such as carbamazepine, phenytoin, or quinine. Fluid and salt replacement, either orally or intravenously, is used to treat dehydration. Treatment of underlying metabolic or neurologic disease, where possible, may help relieve symptoms.


    Alternative treatment



    Cramps may be treated or prevented with Gingko (Ginkgo biloba) or Japanese quince (Chaenomeles speciosa). Supplements of vitamin E, niacin, calcium, and magnesium may also help. Taken at bedtime, they may help to reduce the likelihood of night cramps.


    Prognosis



    Occasional cramps are common, and have no special medical significance.


    Prevention



    The likelihood of developing cramps may be reduced by eating a healthy diet with appropriate levels of minerals, and getting regular exercise to build up energy reserves in muscle. Avoiding exercising in extreme heat helps prevent heat cramps. Heat cramps can also be avoided by taking salt tablets and water before prolonged exercise in extreme heat. Taking a warm bath before bedtime may increase circulation to the legs and reduce the incidence of nighttime leg cramps.


    Key Terms:



    Motor neuron

    Nerve cells within the central nervous system that carry nerve impulses controlling muscle movement.




    Resources:





    Books


    Bradley, Walter G., et al. Neurology in Clinical Practice. 2nd ed. Woburn, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann, 1995.

  19. #19
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    good read jbigdog

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    Thanx guys...very helpful...freaked me out a little...my mom has multiple sclerosis and it's hereditary...so It's a little scary for me when I feel anything out of the ordinary like that...gonna go grab some magnesium and calcium supplements today...what dosage do you guys take?

  21. #21
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    I take a coral calcium mix with magnesium morning and night. 1000mg ed
    IMO...start at 500mg ed

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbigdog69
    I take a coral calcium mix with magnesium morning and night. 1000mg ed
    IMO...start at 500mg ed
    Do I need Nolva with that?

  23. #23
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    Ba ha ha ha ha ha!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by bad_man
    Do I need Nolva with that?
    Yea Brotha...judgeing by the looks of yo fro...you need nolva regardless...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by VIXI
    Thanx guys...very helpful...freaked me out a little...my mom has multiple sclerosis and it's hereditary...so It's a little scary for me when I feel anything out of the ordinary like that...gonna go grab some magnesium and calcium supplements today...what dosage do you guys take?
    Yeah start low with your magnesium in particular. If you want to get a calcium/magnesium combo then you don't have to worry much about too much magnesium, however, if you take the magnesium & calcium as two seperate supplements, don't get magnesium at more than 200mg tables as higher dosages will give you an upset stomach. The 1000mg Coral Calcium supplements with magnesium typically only contain between 100-200mg of magnesium. Just wanted to clarify so you didn't go out and get the 500mg tablets of magnesium and take two of those twice a day cause if you did you would not be feeling well at all.

  25. #25
    tonight is offline Junior Member
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    BTW, just wondering is that a dog or a pig in those photos? It's kind of hard to tell by the a$$ shot. LOL

  26. #26
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    That's my puppy...see the me showing my butt thread..

  27. #27
    Jhn36 is offline Associate Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by VIXI
    That's my puppy...see the me showing my butt thread..
    My wife gets the shakes pretty bad when her water consumption drops to low. Even low doses of clen really get her. Should have seen her trying to touch up her nails before heading to work today. She works at a casino also.
    PS that is the cutest a$$ shot Ive seen in a while

  28. #28
    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    Quote Originally Posted by VIXI
    That's my puppy...see the me showing my butt thread..
    I wanna see YOU showing YOUR butt!

    ~SC~

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwoleCat
    I wanna see YOU showing YOUR butt!

    ~SC~
    agreed...lol

  30. #30
    VIXI's Avatar
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    For god sakes ...it's twitching right along with the rest of me...haven't you guys been reading?...lol...drinking so much water...Is it possible to drown yourself?

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