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  1. #1
    taiboxa's Avatar
    taiboxa is offline "Vanity Redefined" ~VET~
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    Question Purpose of MaltoDextrose?

    i mean dextrose is uber PWO supp but what is the point of malto? i know its like a complex carb w/ a GI of 80+ which in my eyes makes it an EVIL Complex but i too lazy to research on own so i will ask you all for your input TY

  2. #2
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    You're too lazy to do your own research? Not the best way to learn bro...

  3. #3
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    This is the logic behind alot of people's arguments....... personally, I prefer dex by itself...

    Importance of consuming a combination of Maltodextrin & Dextrose

    After reading Old School’s excellent article on post workout nutrition, the reader is now aware of the importance of consuming easily digested, high Gl carbohydrates at this time. But the question is, why a combination of dextrose and maltodextrin? Both are high in Gl rating, and easily digested right? True, but there is more logic than Gl rating to stacking these two powerhouses. Read on for the answer.

    Beginning with the first concept discussed called, “gastric emptying.” Our goal post workout is to maintain a prompt digestion rate so nutrients can transport swiftly and efficiently to our muscles. With that said, it has been shown that this process slows when the ingested fluid contains a high osmolarity concentration (the second concept studied). Osmolarity is dependent on the number of particles in a solution. That is, a100-milliliter solution with 20 glucose molecules will have a higher osmolarity then a100-millileter solution that only contains 10 molecules. The shorter chain length a carbohydrate has, the higher it raises the solution's osmolarity. Therefore, it is no surprise that a pure glucose solution (or dextrose, a monosaccharide) induces very high concentrations of solute (1,3,10).

    Fortunately these negative effects become greatly reduced when the drink contains a glucose polymer stacked with dextrose. However, a carbohydrate that is easily digested, and has a high Gl is still desired. Hence, a combination of dextrose and maltodextrin is advised. Osmolarity will be decreased, and glucose will still enter the blood stream at a proficient rate, thus maintaining its anabolic nature (1,3).

    A second factor concerning osmolarity must now be examined. From a clinical standpoint, it is vital to take into consideration the fact that plasma (the liquid portion of blood) has an Osmolarity of 300 mOsm. This means that if one were to inject a solution with a greater concentration of solute into their blood, it would cause water from inside their red blood cells to leave by Osmosis (water always travels down its concentration gradient) and move into the plasma, in turn shrinking the erythrocytes (red blood cells). This is because the cells are iso-osmotic to the plasma (both have the same concentration of solute) (11).

    A similar concept can be applied to your post workout meal. If a competitor were to consume a solution that was hypertonic or had a higher concentration of solute then 300 mOsm, it could dehydrate them (showing why digestion is rightfully slowed in a high concentrated solution). The addition of maltodextrin once again solves this problem (2,13).

    The next question is, why not just use maltodextrin, and eliminate dextrose since it is so proficient? Ah, once again it is not that simple. Shi. X et al. in an outstanding study, tested the digestive effects of two substrates (any substance acted upon by an enzyme) as opposed to only one substrate in the small intestine. What they found was quite fascinating. The solution containing two substrates stimulated the activation of more transport mechanisms in the intestinal lumen, than did its singular counterpart. Therefore, more carbohydrates were transported out of the small intestine (absorbed into the blood), which additionally aided a greater absorption rate of water into the blood stream (by osmosis). Thus, the higher activation rate of transport mechanisms, even with higher osmolarity facilitated faster energy uptake and hydration (12)!

    One of these mechanisms is the glucose/Sodium co transport system (discussed in further detail shortly). When a proper amount of sodium and glucose are combined, an even greater amount of glucose is absorbed, and in turn, a higher rate of H20 is absorbed. Thus, dextrose increases fluid uptake, and contributes to blood glucose maintenance. Which in turn helps spare liver and muscle glycogen from being depleted (4,5,6).

    As discussed in the Window of Opportunity, these factors make dextrose and maltodextrin the perfect post workout combo. One can purchase both of these in pure form from a local grocery store, or the Internet.


    References

    1. Beckers, E.J., et al.: Comparison of aspiration and scientific graphic. Techniques for the measurement of gastric emptying rates in man

    Gut, 33:115,1992.

    2. Brouns, F., and Beckers, E.: Is the gut an athletic organ? Sports.Med., 15:242, 1993.

    3. Duchman, S.M., et al. Upper limit for intestinal absorption of a dilute glucose solution in men at rest. Med. Sci. Sports Exercise 29: 482,1997.

    4. Gisolfi, C.V., et al.: Intestinal water absorption from select carbohydrate solutions in humans. /. Appl. Physiol., 7:2142, 1992.

    5. Hargreaves, M., et al.: Influence of sodium on glucose bio avail ability during exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., 26:365,1994.

    6. Massicotte, D., et al.: Lack of effect of Nad and/or metoclopramide on exogenous ('^Cj-glucose oxidation during exercise. Int. J. Sports Med., 17:165, 1996.

    10. Schedl, H.P., et al. Intestinal absorption during rest and exercise: implications for formulating an oral re-hydration solution (ORS).

    Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., 26:267, 1994.

    11. Seiple, R.S., et al.: Gastric-emptying characteristics of two glucose polymer-electrolyte solutions. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., 15:366,

    1983.

    12. Shi, X., et al.: Effects of carbohydrate type and concentration and solution osmolality on water absorption. Med.Sci. Sports Exerc.,

    27:1607.1995.

    13. Vist, G.E., and Maughan, R.J.: Gastric emptying of ingested solutions in man: effect of beverage glucose concentration. Med. Sci.

    Sports Exerc., 26:1269, 1994.

    Gathered from an article on abcBBing...

  4. #4
    taiboxa's Avatar
    taiboxa is offline "Vanity Redefined" ~VET~
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    LoL i read that article thats why i like dex alone ... just dont see a point in Malto.. i mean if i want PWO i use dex if i want normal everday carbs i want LOW GI so its like the bastard child to me

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