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  1. #1
    gettankd's Avatar
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    Pure Sugar or Gatorade

    My dextrose won't be hear until tuesday. Yesterday I used 8oz Gatorade w/sugar cubes in my PWO. I made sure it equalled the right amount of carbs from sugar. I was wondering if I should use one over the other until the dex gets here. Regular sugar or Gatorade?

  2. #2
    gettankd's Avatar
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    Or neither?

  3. #3
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    I would rather use Gatorade vs. table sugar....

    I'd suggest using Sweet Tarts, or Smarties, as they are pure dextrose...

    That's what I used b4 my dex came in last spring...(thanks to SC)...

  4. #4
    gettankd's Avatar
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    Sounds Good, Thanks bro

  5. #5
    Nutz56's Avatar
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    what's the point of taking dextrose after a workout with a shake? could somebody please explain this to me??

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nutz56
    what's the point of taking dextrose after a workout with a shake? could somebody please explain this to me??
    replenishes muscle gycogen......starts recovery

  7. #7
    chuck89gt5.0's Avatar
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    What is the difference between table sugar and dextrose? And is table sugar that bad for you post workout?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck89gt5.0
    What is the difference between table sugar and dextrose? And is table sugar that bad for you post workout?
    Read this it might explain a few things

    Sugars are generally classified as simple and compound. Simple sugars consist of monosaccharides, which means one molecule. Compound sugars consist of more than one molecule. Disaccharides have two molecules. Trisaccharides have three molecules and oligosaccharides have up to 6 monosaccharide molecules. Oligosaccharides are found mainly in breast milk and plants. These coat the mucus membranes and are present in saliva. By linking monosaccharide molecules together, sometimes in the hundreds and thousands, a very large molecule is formed called a polysaccharide. Starch and glycogen are polysaccharide molecules stored in the liver to be used as fuel when the need arises. Cellulose is another polysaccharide molecule that cannot be digested by humans because they do not have the necessary enzyme to do so.

    Simple sugars save the body the extra step of breaking them down as has to be done with compound sugars. These include (more info on these below):
    a) Fructose (fruit sugar or levulose) comes from fruits (especially dried), vegetables, and honey.
    b) Galactose comes from plants.
    c) Glucose is the type measured in the blood and is also commonly called dextrose on labels. It comes from fruits and honey.
    d) Mannose comes from the manna ash tree and is always converted into mannitol by the body before use.

    Compound sugars include:
    a) Lactose (glucose and galactose) is also known as "milk sugar."
    b) Lactulose (galactose and fructose) is not found in nature but is manufactured.
    c) Maltose (two molecules of glucose) is also known as malt sugar found in malt, grains, and fruits.
    d) Sucrose (glucose and fructose) is found in sugar cane, sugar beets, and maple syrup.

    The saccharide molecule consists of atoms of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. For every unit of carbon and oxygen, there are two of hydrogen. The way in which these molecules of sugar are arranged determines how the body will absorb and use them. Sugars are important, but only glucose and galactose are prevalent in the average modern diet. The brain uses only glucose and glutamic acid (an amino acid) for fuel. It cannot use fat. If there is no glucose in the diet, the body makes it by converting protein to the brain fuel it needs. On the other hand, high blood sugar levels inhibit the release of linoleic acid from storage thereby contributing to a deficiency in essential fatty acids.

    Two identical amino acids can combine to form only one biochemical message but two identical monosaccharides can form 11 distinct molecular messages. Four different amino acids can form only 24 unique molecules but four different saccharides have the potential of forming 35,560 distinct molecules called tetrasaccharides. These compact sugar packages require significantly less mass in order to convey identical information that is possible by proteins alone. Saccharides determine the difference between blood types (The main blood types are O, A, B, and AB) and enable cells to give and receive instructions thereby eliminating any possibility of genetic chaos through the mixing of species or the wrong blood type.

    When a word ends in "ose", it usually is a sugar. Also, when reading a food label, watch for the positioning of any of these sugars. If it appears near the top of the list, then the product has a high sugar content. If only one is listed or if it listed near the bottom, the product is considered low in sugar content. However, be aware that sugars may be listed separately and together will add up to a significant portion of the product. Another thing to watch for is if a product is labeled 'sugarfree' or 'sugarless'. This does not necessarily mean the obvious. It generally means that the product contains NO SUCROSE but still may contain other forms of sugar.

    Forms of sugar:
    Fructose is a natural sugar found in many foods, especially fruit. The older, common name for it was levulose. However, the fructose found in fruit is not the same as that used in processed foods. That particular fructose is not taken from fruit but is made from corn starch as a commercial, refined sugar known as high-fructose corn syrup -- a thick liquid that contains two basic sugar building blocks, fructose and glucose, in roughly equal amounts. Therefore, eating fresh, raw fruit that contains fructose does not have the same effect on the body that consuming processed foods containing fructose. This is because naturally-occurring fructose breaks down more slowly because it does not require insulin . Instead, it is broken down by an enzyme in the bowel.

    Fructose is three times sweeter than sucrose and accounts for about 10% of the daily calories of the average person. Alone, naturally-occurring fructose causes a much lower rise in blood sugar levels than does sucrose or glucose. Commercially prepared fructose acts more like a fat in the body and is stored in the same manner. Diets high in commercially prepared fructose, especially those low in copper and magnesium, increase blood lipids leading to a higher risk of heart disease. Longterm consumption of commercial fructose is associated with an increased risk of cataracts and kidney stones. High-fructose corn syrup is a very popular sugar which is found in a vast number of processed products under a variety of names.

    Fructose intolerance is a metabolic defect caused by a deficiency of the enzyme fructose-1-phosphoaldosase that results in hypoglycemia and hypophosphatemia (deficiency of blood phosphates). Longterm effects can lead to jaundice and enlargement of the liver. Another disorder involves fructose1,6-diphosphatase which results in hypoglycemia, hyperventilation, shock, and convulsions. The essential treatment is the immediate and lifelong removal of all sources of fructose from the diet along with frequent meals and the avoidance of long fasts.

    Glucose is a simple sugar found in plants and their products. Photosynthesis converts carbon dioxide and water to glucose, which is then stored in leaves, stems, fruits, roots, pods, and seeds as glucose, starch, or other glucose units. Digestion converts the starch back to glucose in the body. Honey and sucrose are composed of 50% glucose and 50% fructose – usually.

    Galactose is a simple sugar found in milk and is more common than glucose. Before it can be utilized by the body for energy, it must be transformed into glucose by the liver. It is the building block of carbohydrate chains associated with lipids (glycolipids) and proteins (glycoproteins).

    Lactose is the major carbohydrate sugar found in milk and the primary source of energy in infants. Lactose usually makes up 4 to 5% of cow's milk. The essential enzyme lactase is required to break lactose down into its simple sugar components of galactose and glucose in order for it to be used by the body. Glucose is used directly but galactose is converted to glucose by the liver. Lactose is used commercially to enhance flavor and to help to brown baked goods. It is also used in the manufacture of pills as it makes them firm when compressed. Lactose intolerance is suffered by millions of people as a result of the lack of its necessary enzyme lactase.

    Maltose is a result of two glucose units linking together and the product of starch breakdown during germination of seeds or of digestion. Maltase is the enzyme required to help breakdown maltose in the body.

    Mannose is formed from glucose in the body and used in the formation of short chain sugars naturally attached to certain proteins. Mannose products have recently begun to make an appearance on the “health” market, claiming to help cure common urinary tract infections. Studies suggest that D-mannose is ten times more effective than cranberries in dislodging E. coli bacteria from the bladder wall, improving more than 90% of UTIs in 24-48 hours. However, unlike antibiotics, D-mannose does not kill any bacteria but simply displaces them, thereby, discouraging them from attaching to the wall of the bladder. In addition, because the body metabolizes only small amounts of D-mannose and excretes the rest in the urine, it does not interfere with blood-sugar regulation even in diabetics.

    Sucrose is the name given to ordinary table sugar. It is a combination of two sugars molecules -- glucose and fructose. Forms of sucrose are: beet sugar; brown sugar; cane sugar; confectioner's sugar; invert sugar; powdered sugar; raw sugar; saccharose; table sugar; and turbinado. Molasses is refined into pure sucrose.

  9. #9
    Nutz56's Avatar
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    thanks for that seanw. what foods specifically then would be high in dextrose? it mentions honey, and says plants and fruits, but none specifically. are all fruits high in dextrose? and, would a fruit juice, like 100% apple juice or 100% orange juice be high in these?

  10. #10
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nutz56
    thanks for that seanw. what foods specifically then would be high in dextrose? it mentions honey, and says plants and fruits, but none specifically. are all fruits high in dextrose? and, would a fruit juice, like 100% apple juice or 100% orange juice be high in these?
    Apples = fructose.... does nothing for PWO....

    Just buy dextrose in powder form.....

    Local breweries, bulk foods places, etc...
    www.kentnutrition.com

  11. #11
    Nutz56's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blown_SC
    Apples = fructose.... does nothing for PWO....

    Just buy dextrose in powder form.....

    Local breweries, bulk foods places, etc...
    www.kentnutrition.com
    alright. thanks a lot blownsc (and sorry if i hijacked ur thread bro, but i figured all the questions i asked would help u as well. forgive me if i'm wrong)

  12. #12
    gettankd's Avatar
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    It's all good, it seems we both gained something from it. I actually just ordered from kentnutrition

  13. #13
    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    I love dextrose!

    ~SC~

  14. #14
    chuck89gt5.0's Avatar
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    So simple sugars do nothing post workout? **** I have been wasting alot of time then....are there any protein powders that already have dextrose in there?

  15. #15
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck89gt5.0
    So simple sugars do nothing post workout? **** I have been wasting alot of time then....are there any protein powders that already have dextrose in there?
    You can buy some pre-mixed, but the ones I've seen are ludicrously expensive vs. making your own.........

  16. #16
    Nutz56's Avatar
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    ok. curious, but does dextrose have any flavor? like, the powder? and, what if i were to put honey into my pwo protein shake? would that be the same as dextrose powder and taste good?

  17. #17
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nutz56
    ok. curious, but does dextrose have any flavor? like, the powder? and, what if i were to put honey into my pwo protein shake? would that be the same as dextrose powder and taste good?
    It tastes like sugar, because that's what it is -- corn sugar.

    Dextrose is better.

  18. #18
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    so you can eat sweet tarts after your workout thats crazy

  19. #19
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by eacman65
    so you can eat sweet tarts after your workout thats crazy
    As a substitute for powdered dextrose, yes. As long as they are in the proper amounts, and with whey, it's fine. However, that method is costly!!

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