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  1. #1
    Alpha-Male's Avatar
    Alpha-Male is offline Senior Member
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    soy protein study...

    Lipoprotein(a) and dietary proteins: casein lowers lipoprotein(a) concentrations as compared with soy protein1,2,3
    Karin Nilausen and Hans Meinertz

    Background: Substitution of soy protein for casein in the diet decreases LDL cholesterol and increases HDL cholesterol. How the 2 proteins affect lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease, is unknown.

    Objective: We compared the effects of dietary soy protein and casein on plasma Lp(a) concentrations.

    Design: Nine normolipidemic men were studied initially while consuming their habitual, self-selected diets, and then, in a crossover design, while consuming 2 liquid-formula diets containing either casein or soy protein. The dietary periods lasted 45 d (n = 7) or 33 d (n = 2). Fasting total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and Lp(a) concentrations were measured throughout.

    Results: After 30 d of each diet, the mean concentration of Lp(a) was not significantly different after the soy-protein and self-selected diets. However, Lp(a) decreased by an average of 50% (P < 0.001) after the casein diet as compared with concentrations after both the soy-protein and self-selected diets. Two weeks after subjects switched from the self-selected to the soy-protein diet, Lp(a) increased by 20% (P = 0.065), but subsequently decreased to baseline. In contrast, the switch to the casein diet did not cause an increase in Lp(a), but instead a continuing decrease in mean concentrations to 65% below baseline (P < 0.0002). Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol were significantly lower 30 d after both the casein and soy-protein diets than after the self-selected diet (P < 0.001). HDL cholesterol was 11% higher after the soy-protein diet than after the casein diet (P < 0.002), but LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triacylglycerol were not significantly different after the casein and soy-protein diets.

    Conclusion: These findings indicate that soy protein may have an Lp(a)-raising effect, potentially detrimental to its use in antiatherogenic diets

  2. #2
    Kärnfysikern's Avatar
    Kärnfysikern is offline Retired: AR-Hall of Famer
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    damn didnt know that. Found anything more on the subject?

  3. #3
    Alpha-Male's Avatar
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    naw, i was actually researching something completely different when that study popped up, thought you'd like to see it...

  4. #4
    Kärnfysikern's Avatar
    Kärnfysikern is offline Retired: AR-Hall of Famer
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    yeah. It doesnt seem to be anything conclusive though and heart diseases is far less comon in soy rich countries. But I will look into it closely to se what the deal is.

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