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  1. #1
    Evil Predator's Avatar
    Evil Predator is offline Senior Member
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    Aspartame, how bad is it?

    Diet pepsi carries one calorie, but what about the aspartame? any negative side effects when trying to burn fat? How often is it ok to drink diet soda's??

    I dont drink them often at all, maybe one every week or so, but is this something i should cut out entirely??

  2. #2
    mitch428cj's Avatar
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    Diet coke is ok , ive heard that aspartame builds up in the eyes and all sorts of bad sh!t about it , dont know whats true about that but they make coke with Splenda now .

  3. #3
    Evil Predator's Avatar
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    Over the past few months ive taken as much sugar out of my diet as i can, and replacing it with natural sugars from fruits, and using sweeteners in coffee. My father is diabetic, adult onset from years of eating sugary foods, and its one thing im trying to avoid like the plague. That, and my goals for my body just cant be attained eating cakes and pies everyday...

    But i still like something a little sweet now and then, and diet pepsi fills that need

  4. #4
    mitch911 is offline Member
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    diet pops is the only thing that gets me throgh the nites when i go out with buddies lets hope it aint that bad

  5. #5
    *Narkissos*'s Avatar
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    The aspartame scare is overrated.

    Enjoy your diet pep

  6. #6
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    aspartame and acesulfame K are apparent cancer causing agents, though this is not definate.

    was found that it occured in rats given it, and my gfs uncle died of liver cancer and he only ever drank diet coke!!

  7. #7
    IronFreakX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rixyroids
    aspartame and acesulfame K are apparent cancer causing agents, though this is not definate.

    was found that it occured in rats given it, and my gfs uncle died of liver cancer and he only ever drank diet coke!!
    1: J Am Diet Assoc. 1983 Aug;83(2):142-6.


    Can aspartame meet our expectations?

    Horwitz DL, Bauer-Nehrling JK.

    Aspartame is a dipeptide containing aspartic acid and phenylalanine methyl ester. It is a nutritive sweetener with a caloric value equivalent to that of other proteins and with sweetness approximately 180 times that of sucrose. Thus, for equivalent sweetening power, it contributes only 0.5% of the kilocalories of sugar. Numerous studies have shown no potential toxicity of amounts of aspartame likely to be ingested, or even of abuse doses. Although aspartame cannot fully replace sugar, it appears to be a safe and acceptable sweetener for those who must, or desire to, reduce their intake of sucrose.
    1: Med Pregl. 2003;56 Suppl 1:27-9.


    [Controversies with aspartame]

    [Article in Serbian]

    Jankovic SM.

    slobnera@eunet.yu

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial sweeteners are nowadays inevitable food additives, since they provide necessary food diversity to people suffering from diabetes. Aspartame is the most frequently used artificial sweetener ever and its safety profile is much better than that of saccharin or cyclamate. It received marketing approval in 1973, but only 3 months later aspartame was withdrawn because of allegations based on improperly designed experimental studies dealing with its carcinogen effects on rodent brain. However, extensive studies using the same model did not confirm such suspicions, and aspartame received a second marketing approval. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES: Almost two decades later an epidemiological study found a relationship between aspartame and an increased frequency of brain tumors in humans. However, this study included a short time span of observation, and it did not estimate actual intake of aspartame, which led to loss of validity. Later on no epidemiological studies found correlation between aspartame use and incidence of brain tumors in humans. Up to now the only safety concern about aspartame, which received valid scientific proofs, is pro-seizure action of its excessive intake. In patients with epilepsy, excessive intake of aspartame can decrease the threshold for seizures or prolong them once they appear. However, if the intake is not above the recommended level of 40 mg/kg b.w./day, aspartame is well tolerated even in this subpopulation. CONCLUSION: Based on detailed analysis of published studies on safety of aspartame, it should not be restricted, but used in recommended amounts.
    1: J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 1996 Nov;55(11):1115-23.


    Comment in:
    J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 1996 Dec;55(12):1280.
    J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 1997 Jan;56(1):105-6.
    J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 1997 Jan;56(1):107-9.

    Increasing brain tumor rates: is there a link to aspartame?

    Olney JW, Farber NB, Spitznagel E, Robins LN.

    Department of Psychiatry, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

    In the past two decades brain tumor rates have risen in several industrialized countries, including the United States. During this time, brain tumor data have been gathered by the National Cancer Institute from catchment areas representing 10% of the United States population. In the present study, we analyzed these data from 1975 to 1992 and found that the brain tumor increases in the United States occurred in two distinct phases, an early modest increase that may primarily reflect improved diagnostic technology, and a more recent sustained increase in the incidence and shift toward greater malignancy that must be explained by some other factor(s). Compared to other environmental factors putatively linked to brain tumors, the artificial sweetener aspartame is a promising candidate to explain the recent increase in incidence and degree of malignancy of brain tumors. Evidence potentially implicating aspartame includes an early animal study revealing an exceedingly high incidence of brain tumors in aspartame-fed rats compared to no brain tumors in concurrent controls, the recent finding that the aspartame molecule has mutagenic potential, and the close temporal association (aspartame was introduced into US food and beverage markets several years prior to the sharp increase in brain tumor incidence and malignancy). We conclude that there is need for reassessing the carcinogenic potential of aspartame.
    1: Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2002 Apr;35(2 Pt 2):S1-93. Related Articles, Links


    Aspartame: review of safety.

    Butchko HH, Stargel WW, Comer CP, Mayhew DA, Benninger C, Blackburn GL, de Sonneville LM, Geha RS, Hertelendy Z, Koestner A, Leon AS, Liepa GU, McMartin KE, Mendenhall CL, Munro IC, Novotny EJ, Renwick AG, Schiffman SS, Schomer DL, Shaywitz BA, Spiers PA, Tephly TR, Thomas JA, Trefz FK.

    Medical and Scientific Affairs, The NutraSweet Company, Mt Prospect, Illinois 60056, USA. harriett.h.butchko@nutrasweet.com

    Over 20 years have elapsed since aspartame was approved by regulatory agencies as a sweetener and flavor enhancer. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic constituents was established through extensive toxicology studies in laboratory animals, using much greater doses than people could possibly consume. Its safety was further confirmed through studies in several human subpopulations, including healthy infants, children, adolescents, and adults; obese individuals; diabetics; lactating women; and individuals heterozygous (PKUH) for the genetic disease phenylketonuria (PKU) who have a decreased ability to metabolize the essential amino acid, phenylalanine. Several scientific issues continued to be raised after approval, largely as a concern for theoretical toxicity from its metabolic components--the amino acids, aspartate and phenylalanine, and methanol--even though dietary exposure to these components is much greater than from aspartame. Nonetheless, additional research, including evaluations of possible associations between aspartame and headaches, seizures, behavior, cognition, and mood as well as allergic-type reactions and use by potentially sensitive subpopulations, has continued after approval. These findings are reviewed here. The safety testing of aspartame has gone well beyond that required to evaluate the safety of a food additive. When all the research on aspartame, including evaluations in both the premarketing and postmarketing periods, is examined as a whole, it is clear that aspartame is safe, and there are no unresolved questions regarding its safety under conditions of intended use.
    No I dont work for an aspartame company

  8. #8
    IronFreakX's Avatar
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    And why you should avoid regular pepsi/coke

    Relation between consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and childhood obesity: a prospective, observational analysis.

    Ludwig DS, Peterson KE, Gortmaker SL.

    Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. david.ludwig@tch.harvard.edu

    BACKGROUND: The rising prevalence of obesity in children has been linked in part to the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks. Our aim was to examine this relation. METHODS: We enrolled 548 ethnically diverse schoolchildren (age 11.7 years, SD 0.8) from public schools in four Massachusetts communities, and studied them prospectively for 19 months from October, 1995, to May, 1997. We examined the association between baseline and change in consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks (the independent variables), and difference in measures of obesity, with linear and logistic regression analyses adjusted for potentially confounding variables and clustering of results within schools. FINDINGS: For each additional serving of sugar-sweetened drink consumed, both body mass index (BMI) (mean 0.24 kg/m2; 95% CI 0.10-0.39; p=0.03) and frequency of obesity (odds ratio 1.60; 95% CI 1.14-2.24; p=0.02) increased after adjustment for anthropometric, demographic, dietary, and lifestyle variables. Baseline consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks was also independently associated with change in BMI (mean 0.18 kg/m2 for each daily serving; 95% CI 0.09-0.27; p=0.02). INTERPRETATION: Consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks is associated with obesity in children.
    Sugar-sweetened beverages, weight gain, and incidence of type 2 diabetes in young and middle-aged women.

    Schulze MB, Manson JE, Ludwig DS, Colditz GA, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC, Hu FB.

    Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass, USA. mschulze@channing.harvard.edu

    CONTEXT: Sugar-sweetened beverages like soft drinks and fruit punches contain large amounts of readily absorbable sugars and may contribute to weight gain and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but these relationships have been minimally addressed in adults. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight change and risk of type 2 diabetes in women. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective cohort analyses conducted from 1991 to 1999 among women in the Nurses' Health Study II. The diabetes analysis included 91,249 women free of diabetes and other major chronic diseases at baseline in 1991. The weight change analysis included 51,603 women for whom complete dietary information and body weight were ascertained in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We identified 741 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes during 716,300 person-years of follow-up. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Weight gain and incidence of type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Those with stable consumption patterns had no difference in weight gain, but weight gain over a 4-year period was highest among women who increased their sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption from 1 or fewer drinks per week to 1 or more drinks per day (multivariate-adjusted means, 4.69 kg for 1991 to 1995 and 4.20 kg for 1995 to 1999) and was smallest among women who decreased their intake (1.34 and 0.15 kg for the 2 periods, respectively) after adjusting for lifestyle and dietary confounders. Increased consumption of fruit punch was also associated with greater weight gain compared with decreased consumption. After adjustment for potential confounders, women consuming 1 or more sugar-sweetened soft drinks per day had a relative risk [RR] of type 2 diabetes of 1.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42-2.36; P<.001 for trend) compared with those who consumed less than 1 of these beverages per month. Similarly, consumption of fruit punch was associated with increased diabetes risk (RR for > or =1 drink per day compared with <1 drink per month, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.33-3.03; P =.001). CONCLUSION: Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with a greater magnitude of weight gain and an increased risk for development of type 2 diabetes in women, possibly by providing excessive calories and large amounts of rapidly absorbable sugars.
    If i ever have a mini-IronFreakX...he aint gonna be drinking the regular pepsi

  9. #9
    *Narkissos*'s Avatar
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    Good studies...

  10. #10
    Phixion is offline New Member
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    Some research shows aspartame actually stimulate appetite cravings of carbs. It signals you body cells to store carbs and fats, which causes the body to crave more food.

    I've noticed I start craving bread when I drink to much diet soda.

  11. #11
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  12. #12
    IronFreakX's Avatar
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    "Fact-twisting leaches, er, excuse me, the media"


  13. #13
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    i've posted on this before, but the only problem lies with those who cannot properly metabolize phenylalanine...one of the byproducts of aspartame is phenylalanine, and there are some who have a condition known as phenylketonuria and cannot metabolize this compound...therefore, it can build up in the body and cause problems...

    there have been over 200 studies on aspartame over the past 40 years all showing that it's use is safe (key note: all of these studies were done at or above the ADI set by the FDA which is close to 20 12oz cans of soda per day)...in normal adults, all of the byproducts of aspartame are properly metabolized by the body...

    every major medical organization you can think of backs these claims, just search it on google and scroll past the first couple of "doomsday" links spewing bullshit they can't back up...

    Splenda is okay, so far, but has not been studied as extensively as aspartame...saccharin is the "rat study" sweetener that was linked to cancer in large doses (however, those doses were significantly higher than what a person would normally consume in a day)...Stevia is still very new, and has not been studied enough, therefore, even though most claim it's safe, i'd give it some time...peace

    AM

  14. #14
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    Word!

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