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  1. #1
    margo is offline Female Member
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    Question Why not mix carbs and fat?

    I´ve been reading that you should not mix carbs and fat together. Does anybody know why?
    Margo

  2. #2
    Pheedno is offline Respected Member
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    The body uses both for energy. Consuming too much of a combonation will result in the body using one as energy and storing the other as fat.

  3. #3
    Pheedno is offline Respected Member
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    On another note, a certain amount of both can be consumed at the same time as long as you don't overstep what your body needs for energy.

    The seperation of the two just simplifies the digestion process and usually makes for a more effecient metabolism. If your cutting, this would be best. If maintaining or bulking, I say combine as long as you don't consume so much that the body stores one and uses the other.

  4. #4
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    painintheazz is offline Anabolic Member
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    Phee is on the money with that answer.

    Pain

  5. #5
    margo is offline Female Member
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    I´ve been thinking about this topic.... What kind of carbs and fat do people usually mix together??? Maybe a difficult question but I was just wondering what combo should I avoid.
    With what do you use your peanut butter?
    Margo

  6. #6
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    BIG TEXAN is offline Respected Member
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    Try to avoid mixing carbs and fats altogether. I toss my pb in with my protein shakes (except pre and post workout shakes) Or just maybe on a piece of toast.

  7. #7
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    Rich8888 is offline Member
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    Margo, guys....check this out

    Making Sense of Carbohydrates and Fats

    Michael Montignac wrote an intriguing book that talks about some basic food and eating principles that I didn't know about. I've commented about his first book here before.

    He talks about a bunch of stuff in his 'Dine Out and Lose Weight' book, but the most intriguing I find wasn't so much about the whole lose weight thing, but from a standpoint of learning more about dietetics, food chemistry and the effect basic food elements have on the body. I'll summarize what for me is his key messages here, and I strongly recommend his book as a followup.


    A carbohydrate is a substance that the body converts into glucose in the bloodstream. Starches, sugars, and cellulose (and under the hood, anything that contains only hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen) are all carbohydrates [Dictionary.com def]
    The blood needs a certain level of glucose in the bloodstream.
    Excess glucose in the bloodstream triggers the release of insulin into the bloodstream by the pancreas.
    A poorly functioning, (or hypoglycaemic) pancreas will release more insulin than necessary to convert the glucose into glycogen for short term storage, or fat for long-term storage. [1]
    Glycogen is stored in the muscles and liver.
    Insulin will also store energy from any fat you eat.
    If you eat carbs with fat, a hypoglycaemic pancreas will therefore produce enough insulin for all the glucose created by the carbs, and have some left. What is left will store energy from the extra fat as well.
    This means that your tendency to gain weight is heavily influenced by the state of your pancreas.
    This also suggests the main problem of weight gain is when carbs and fats are eaten together.
    Some carbs result in less glucose than others. As a general rule:
    processed, refined, cooked, and sweet carbs generally result in more glucose, termed 'bad' carbs by Montignac and are to generally to be avoided, particularly in combination with fats. Interesting that cooked carrots are particularly bad it seems.
    vegetables, whole kernal cereal products, fruits, and high cocoa chocolate result in less glucose and therefore are deemed 'good carbs'.
    'Good' carbs are good because the amount of insulin (and overproduction of insulin in the case of hypoglycemic people) is less and the fat metabolisation effects are greatly reduced
    So this is just scratching the surface. He also talks about the

    The Calorie Myth (how calorie counting is a complete waste of time)
    The importance of fibre. And how white rice offers almost nothing of real benefit to the body.
    The importance of essential fats (olive oils, fish oils are particularly good).
    How white sugar offers no benefits at all and he describes it as 'poison'.
    Lots of good stuff for everyone, even if you're not particularly worried about losing weight, I found it interesting and consistent with my current understanding (and others too).

    [1]I don't understand this bit still... the rules that dictate when glucose is stored as fat and how this affects weight gain. I think the difference is that this is fat that is created by the body, vs fat introduced directly by food.

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