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  1. #1
    goose is offline Banned
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    Des (1-3) Igf-1 (not The Same As Igf-1)

    Ok so we know what IGF-1 (Insulin like growth factor-1) is,Des (1-3) IGF-1 is over 10 times (1000%) more anabolic than IGF-1. Now that is amazing!!
    Now this could add LBM,who knows,LOL.

    IGF-1 is actually produced from both Insulin and growth hormone in the liver and other tissues. IGF-1 is made up of 70 amino acids in a chain. Well, when a clever chemist removes the last 3 amino acids in the IGF-1 chain (the N-terminal tri-peptide) it becomes Des (1-3) IGF-1 and 1000% plus more anabolic. Why?

    IGF-1 circulates through our blood stream and tissue 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Unfortunately, most of the IGF-1 is inactive because it is bound by another protein called (get this) IGF-1 Binding Protein-3, or IGF-1-BP-3 for short. Since bound hormones can not fit into and trigger a receptor-site, the majority of circulating and muscle IGF-1 can not trigger an anabolic stimulus. Like tons of cellulite in a porno movie (who watches those?) there is little good stuff happening. However, when IGF-1 is altered and becomes Des (1-3) IGF-1 the binding protein IGF-1-BP-3 can not bind to it and it is totally active. Another reason Des (1-3) IGF-1 is so potent is its unique ability to fit into lactic acid altered IGF-1 receptor sites. (YUP) When we train we burn carbohydrates as a fuel to make cellular ATP. When cells switch to this ATP pathway, the by-product is Lactic Acid. This is of course the cause of most of the burn we feel during intense or higher rep sets. Well, the lactic acid build-up is called acidosis, and it destroys the shape of some receptor-sites for period of time. Therefore some anabolic/anti-catabolic hormones have difficulty merging with their respective receptorsite and triggering a response (such as even unbound IGF-1). Not so with Des (1-3) IGF- 1, the super growth factor. It fits into the IGF-1 receptor-site even after acidosis. Des (1- 3) IGF-1 is unbound, over 10 times more potent than IGF-1, and it picks receptor-site locks. Too bad it has only a few minute active-life.

    Did you know that our body's make Des (1-3) IGF-1 naturally? Most un-informed individuals claim other wise, but it is true. When an athlete trains lactic acid builds up in muscle tissue. As we know, there is always IGF-1 / GH present in the blood stream and tissues (including muscle) from prior work-outs and other metabolic factors. That lactic acid burn triggers IGF-1/GH secretion from both prior and present work-outs. Unfortunately, lactic acid destroys some of the IGF-1 present in muscles being trained. But wait, this is good too!

    Lactic acid also cuts (truncates) the last 3 amino acids off the 70 amino acid chain of "some" of the surviving IGF-1 and creates Des (I-3) IGF-1. So acidosis increases GH/IGF-1 production in the liver, "unbinds" IGF-1 locally in the muscle being trained (burned), destroys some of the IGF-1, and converts some IGF-1 into Des (I-3) IGF-1. Huh, good deal. And the synthetic form of this super anabolic stuff is beginning to show up on the black market in England but is very expensive,where the hell is this coming from,another Enigma to deal with.Looks very Promising,just like my porn collection.





    goose4..
    Last edited by goose; 01-17-2006 at 08:29 AM.

  2. #2
    FranKieC's Avatar
    FranKieC is offline "AR's Pretty Boy"
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    Interesting

  3. #3
    sadukar is offline Junior Member
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    very interesting. I'm NOT trying to pimp a product here, but, do you think I B E's cell mediation could help with the short half-life problem? It supposedly releases small amounts of the compound for up to 24-48 hours... What if you could have a slow release of this stuff over time like the LR3 they sell? The request has already been submitted
    Last edited by sadukar; 01-17-2006 at 11:26 AM.

  4. #4
    goose is offline Banned
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    Some more info,for you IGF nuts.


    IGF-I in Mammary Gland Development*
    by David L. Kleinberg

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Summary
    In 1957 Salmon and Daughaday could never have imagined that the sulfation factor they discovered [1] - later named insulin -like growth factor I or IGF-I - would turn out to have so many important biological functions [2]. We now know that IGF-I possesses a plethora of biologic actions on cell growth and death, linear growth, embryonic and postnatal growth, ovarian function, and protein and carbohydrate metabolism [2]. Several recent articles focus our attention on another important action of IGF-I: modulation of mammary gland function.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A number of lines of experimental evidence to suggest that IGF-I mediates the important actions of growth hormone (GH) in normal mammary development at the time of puberty. Several years ago, we demonstrated that hGH increased mammary gland IGF-I mRNA content, as assessed by solution hybridization/RNase protection assay [3]. More recently we also showed that administration of estradiol enhanced the stimulatory effects of hGH on mammary gland IGF-I mRNA [4]. Additionally, locally implanted IGF-I and des(1-3)IGF-I significantly increased the number of terminal end buds (TEBs) in mammary glands of hypophysectomized, castrated sexually immature male rats also treated with estradiol [5], and in females rats similarly treated [4]. These anatomical changes mimicked those of pubertal development.

    Based on the results of hormone replacement studies to identify individual pituitary hormones responsible for mediating the pituitary gland's pivotal role in mammary development [6], Lyons and colleagues were the first investigators to suggest that GH was central to the process of mammary gland development [7]. Our more recent studies have repopularized and extended the findings of Lyons. We noted that both lactogenic and non-lactogenic GHs were far more potent than prolactins (PRLs) from the same species in the process of mammary development [3]. Furthermore, we found that the GH receptor mediated mammary gland differentiation and development induced by pituitary hormones. In these studies, native and mutant forms of GH, PRL and placental lactogen were tested for their effects on mammary development (together with estradiol, E2), binding to GH receptor, and ability to activate PRL receptor [8]. Only natural or mutant hormones with high binding affinity to GH receptors were found to induce mammary development, regardless of their lactogenicity. Therefore, we concluded that GH was the pituitary hormone most central to mammary development, and that it probably acts, at least in part, through local production of IGF-I in stroma [9]. It should be noted that in transgenic mice expressing hGH (which binds to both PRL- and GH-receptors), the animals developed precocious mammary gland development and milk protein synthesis [10]. The role of PRL in mammary development has not been included here, although PRL did not increase IGF-I mRNA [3] in rat mammary gland. Nevertheless, PRL may still play a role in the early development of the mammary gland in addition to its well documented effect in lactogenesis [11]. GH may also have direct effects on specific steps in mammary development that may not be mediated by IGF-I, although these have not been carefully delineated.

    Despite the fact that both GH and IGF-I can stimulate a small amount of new TEB formation in the absence of E2, and that E2 in the absence of the pituitary has no effect on induction of these structures, E2 is extremely important in pubertal development of the mammary gland [12]. Studies showing that pure antiestrogens implanted in the substance of mouse mammary glands locally inhibit ductal mammogenesis suggest that estrogens act directly on the mammary gland, rather than through intermediaries produced at distant sites, such as the pituitary gland [13]. This does not rule out the possibility that E2 acts locally in the mammary gland through production of intermediaries such as TGFa, which also causes mammary hyperplasia when it is overexpressed in transgenic mice [14,15]. Assuming that mammary development occurs via the cascade of peptide hormones referred to above, the site of E2 interaction with peptide hormones probably occurs after IGF-I production, since E2 is known to synergize with IGF-I in the absence of GH [4].

    Des(1-3)IGF-I is more potent than native IGF-I in stimulating mammary gland development, because this aminoterminally shortened form of IGF-I has a lower affinity for insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) [16]. The effects of IGFBPs on mammary gland function are likely to be very important. Both IGF-I and des(1-3)IGF-I are known to stimulate IGFBP production in bovine mammary epithelial cells [17]. IGF-I also stimulates at least one IGFBP in milk from lactating mice [18]. IGFBP-1 has been found to inhibit E2-induced MCF-7 cell growth [19], and IGFBP-3, which can inhibit IGF-I action by binding to it, has also been found to bind to the cell surface of mammary tumor cells and inhibit their growth [20]. Whether IGF-I in the mammary gland needs to be converted to des(1-3) IGF-I by a protease, in order to act without interference by IGFBP, has not been ascertained [21].

    Two recent articles suggest that overexpression of IGF-I alters mammary glandular structures in fully developed adult animals at the time of lactation. Hadsell and colleagues, using an elegant experimental model of transgenic mice, studied the effects of IGF-I or des(1-3) IGF-I, an aminoterminally shortened form of IGF-I, on the mammary gland during and after lactation [18] (information on transgenic mice). The transgene was coupled to the whey acidic protein gene promoter to allow for mammary specific expression. In this model, IGF-I production in the mammary gland is partially under the control of the hormones of pregnancy and lactation, which cause expression of the rat whey acidic protein gene and therefore, the IGF-I gene coupled to it. In these transgenic animals, IGF-I appeared to prevent mammary gland involution after lactation and caused ductile hypertrophy. In a similar animal model, in which IGF-I or BP-3 were overexpressed (information on transgenic mice), Neuenschwander and colleagues found that both proteins inhibited apoptosis of mammary glandular cells [22]. Although the relevance of the findings in these two studies to normal physiology is unclear, this model provides investigators with a tool to study the effects of localized, chronic IGF-I stimulation on mammary morphology (in primiparous or multiparous animals), lactation, and possibly carcinogenesis.

    The mechanism by which des(1-3) IGF-I induces new mammary gland development [4,5], or inhibits post-lactational involution [18], is not fully known. Although inhibition of apoptosis is likely one of the mechanisms involved [2,22], a positive effect on cell proliferation and differentiation may also be important. In the case of mammary development in sexually immature animals, an effect of IGF-I on new glandular proliferation must be important since TEBs are not previously present. Inhibition of apoptosis might also play a role in pubertal development. Thus, the importance of IGF-I in mammary development and function at different phases of life, its dependence of GH, and the mechanisms by which it acts, will likely require years of further investigation. Implied in the process of understanding the effects of IGF-I on mammary gland development at various stages of life is the eventual possibility that those observations might be applicable to better understanding and treating breast cancer.

    *Excerpted from and based on a previously published editorial in Endocrinology (137:1-2, 1996).


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    References

    1. Salmon WDJ, Daughaday WH. A hormonally controlled serum factor which stimulates sulfate incorporation by cartilage in vitro. J Lab Clin Med 1957;49:825-36.

    2. Jones JI, Clemmons DR. Insulin-like growth factors and their binding proteins: biological actions. Endocrine Rev 1995;16(1):3-34.

    3. Kleinberg DL, Ruan WF, Catanese V, Newman CB, Feldman M. Non-lactogenic effects of growth hormone on growth and insulin-like growth factor-I messenger ribonucleic acid of rat mammary gland. Endocrinol 1990;126:3274-6.

    4. Ruan W, Catanese V, Wieczorek R, Feldman M, Kleinberg DL. Estradiol enhances the stimulatory effect of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) on mammary development and growth hormone-induced IGF-I messenger ribonucleic acid. Endocrinol 1995;136:1296-302.

    5. Ruan W, Newman CB, Kleinberg DL. Intact and aminoterminally shortened forms of insulin-like growth factor I induce mammary gland differentiation and development. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1992;89:10872-6.

    6. Reece RP, Turner CW, Hill RT. Mammary gland development in the hypophysectomized albino rat. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1936;34:204-17.

    7. Lyons WR, Johnson RE, Cole RD, et al.; Smith RW, Gaebler OH, Long CNH, editors. The Hypophyseal Growth Hormone, Nature and Actions. New York: McGraw Hill, 1955;Mammary growth and lactation in male rats. p. 461-72.

    8. Feldman M, Ruan W, Cunningham BC, Wells JA, Kleinberg DL. Evidence that the growth hormone receptor mediates differentiation and development of the mammary gland. Endocrinol 1993;133:1602-8.

    9. Yee D, Paik S, Lebovic S, Marcus RR, Favoni RE, Cullen KJ, Lippman ME, Rosen N. Analysis of insulin-like growth factor 1 gene expression in malignancy: Evidence for a paracrine role in human breast cancer. Mol Endocrinol 1989;3:509-17.

    10. Bchini O, Andres AC, Schubaur B, Mehtali M, LeMeur M, Lathe R, Gerlinger P. Precocious mammary gland development and milk protein synthesis in transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing human growth hormone. Endocrinol 1991;128:539-46.

    11. Plaut K, Ikeda M, Vonderhaar BK. Role of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I in mammary development. Endocrinol 1993;133:1843-8.

    12. Gardner WU, White A. Mammary growth in hypophysectomized male mice receiving estrogen prolactin. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1941;48:590-2.

    13. Silberstein GB, Van Horn K, Shyamala G, Daniel CW. Essential role of endogenous estrogen in directly stimulating mammary growth demonstrated by implants containing pure antiestrogens. Endocrinol 1994;134:84-90.

    14. Sandgren EP, Luetteke NC, Palmiter RD, Brinster RL, Lee DC. Overexpression of TGF_ in transgenic mice: induction of epithelial hyperplasia, pancreatic metaplasia and carcinoma of the breast. Cell 1990;61:1121-35.

    15. Matsui Y, Halter SA, Holt JT, Hogan BLM, Coffey RJ. Development of mammary hyperplasia and neoplasia in MMTV-TGF_ transgenic mice. Cell 1990;61:1147-55.

    16. Carlsson-Skwirut C, Lake M, Hartmanis M, Hall K, Ara VR. A comparison of the biological activity of the recombinant intact and truncated insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Biochim Biophys Acta 1989;1011:192-7.

    17. McGrath MF, Collier RJ, Clemmons DR, Busby WH, Sweeney CA, Krivi GG. The direct in vitro effect of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) on normal bovine mammary cell proliferation and production of IGF binding proteins. Endocrinol 1991;129:671-8.

    18. Hadsell DL, Greenberg NM, Fligger JM, Baumrucker CR, Rosen JM. Targeted expression of des(1-3) human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in transgenic mice influences mammary gland development and IGF-binding protein expression. Endocrinolgy 1997;137:321-30.

    19. Figueroa JA, Sharma J, Jackson JG, McDermott MJ, Hilsenbeck SG, Yee D. Recombinant insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 inhibits IGF-I, serum, and estrogen-dependent growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. J Cell Physiol 1993;157:229-36.

    20. Oh Y, Muller HL, Lamson G, Rosenfeld RG. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-independent action of IGF-binding protein-3 in Hs578T human breast cancer cells: cell surface binding and growth inhibition. J Biol Chem 1993;268:14964-71.

    21. Yamamoto H, Murphy LJ. N-Terminal truncated insulin-like growth factor-I in human urine. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1995;80:1179-83.

    22. Neuenschwander S, Schwartz A, Wood TL, Roberts CTJ, Henninghausen L, LeRoith D. Involution of the lactating mammary gland is inhibited by the IGF system in a transgenic mouse model. J Clin Invest 1996;97:2225-32.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    goose4..

  5. #5
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    very interesting gave me wood until the couple minute Active life

  6. #6
    goose is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildcatbadass
    very interesting gave me wood until the couple minute Active life

    With cell mutation,it might be possible to expand the active life in the furture.



    goose4..

  7. #7
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    haha i'm not into cell mutation. I'd rather just do the gene doping thing....
    -Wild

  8. #8
    sadukar is offline Junior Member
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    Do you know the actuall peptide structure of this compound?

  9. #9
    goose is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadukar
    Do you know the actuall peptide structure of this compound?
    This is the best help I can give you

    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=1138570


    goose4..

  10. #10
    Cant allow is offline New Member
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    we just contacted our peptide company to get this active form produced and then we will put it in our drug delievery system (cell mediated) form

  11. #11
    AnabolicAndre's Avatar
    AnabolicAndre is offline Anabolic Member
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    that'd be nuts.

    but will it be oral?
    Honestly I shelled out the cash for your other IGF product and was not pleased.

  12. #12
    Cant allow is offline New Member
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    the problem with this des(1-3) IGF it won't work injectable due to the half life so this is where our technology comes in to play. you see our technolog is used in gene therapy which will extend the life of this peptide

  13. #13
    Cant allow is offline New Member
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    well just got a price for the des(1-3) IGF-1 and we all might as well forget about this IGF-1 ever coming to the market....LOL the price is for RG des(1-3) IGf-1 $9,000 for only 5mg....LOL forget about it guy's. now MG might be alittle cheaper but still not worth it

  14. #14
    sadukar is offline Junior Member
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    thanks for trying!!

  15. #15
    goose is offline Banned
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