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  1. #1
    MilitiaGuy's Avatar
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    Thumbs up I am happy :A big win for Tehran mayor in Iran elections

    A big win for Tehran mayor in Iran elections
    The conservative Tehran mayor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad swept to a landslide win in presidential elections on Saturday.

    Ahmadinejad won the backing of the religious poor to defeat veteran political heavyweight and former Iranian president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, who was supported by pro-reform parties and wealthy Iranians.

    "The figures show that Ahmadinejad is the winner," Interior Ministry spokesman Jahanbakhsh Khanjani told reporters.

    Ahmadinejad will be Iran's first non-cleric president for 24 years when he takes office in August.

    An official at the Guardian Council, which must approve the election results, said that out of 24.8 million votes counted, Ahmadinejad had won 61.7 percent.

    Officials said turnout was about 26 million, or 56 percent, down from the 63 percent of Iran's 46.7 million eligible voters who cast ballots in the first round on June 17.

    "It's over, we accept that we've lost," said a close aide to Rafsanjani.

    Shift in power

    Although Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has the last word on all matters of state, a conservative presidency removes the moderating influence on decision-making exercised by outgoing reformist President Mohammad Khatami since 1997.

    "This all but closes the door for a breakthrough in U.S.-Iran relations," said Karim Sadjadpour, a Tehran-based analyst for the International Crisis Group.

    "I think Ahmadinejad is less amenable to compromise on the nuclear issue, but it is unclear how much influence he will have on it," he added.

    The result was a crushing blow to Rafsanjani who has been at the forefront of Iranian politics since the 1979 Islamic revolution and was widely considered Iran's second most powerful figure before the vote. His last venture to the polls in 2000 parliamentary elections also ended in failure.

    "Today is the beginning of a new political era," Ahmadinejad said after voting on Friday.

    Friday's vote exposed deep class divisions in the nation of 67 million people.

    A former member of the special forces of Iran's hardline Revolutionary Guards, Ahmadinejad's humble lifestyle and pledges to tackle corruption and redistribute the country's oil wealth appealed to the urban and rural religious poor.

    He promised the Middle East's most populous nation that oil wealth would be more fairly distributed.

    Rafsanjani, by contrast, is widely seen as being extremely wealthy -- and had struggled to win support from many voters disenchanted with Iran's political elite.

    "I vote for Ahmadinejad because he wants to…(put an end to those) who are stealing the national wealth and he wants to fight poverty," said Rahmatollah Izadpanah.

    Washington repeated its accusations that the vote was unfair due to the disqualification of more than 1,000 hopeful candidates.

    "We remain sceptical that the Iranian regime is interested in addressing either the legitimate desires of its own people or the concerns of the broader international community," said a State Department spokeswoman.

    A former two-term president, Rafsanjani is a pragmatic conservative who had proclaimed himself as being open to restoring relations with the United States and continuing reform. Some experts believe that this defeat could force him into political exile and remove what has been a moderating influence within the 26-year-old theocracy.

    Amid apparent fears of a violent reaction to the result, the Islamic republic's supreme leader Khamenei issued a decree banning the supporters of either candidate from taking to the streets later in the morning.

    The election has been seen as the most critical since the 1979 Islamic revolution, and emotions have been running high. As voting was underway Friday, the interior ministry warned that conservatives were meddling and even threatened to suspend voting in some stations.

    Rafsanjani and two beaten reformist candidates alleged that Ahmadinejad's shock first-round vote success earlier this month came thanks to orchestrated fraud carried by well-financed conservative regime elements such as the Guardians Council, the Basij group and Revolutionary Guards.



    Now thats some good news for me, I was waiting the elections results and I thought he might lose.
    Last edited by MilitiaGuy; 06-25-2005 at 04:55 PM.

  2. #2
    Z-Ro's Avatar
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    Whats conservative mean in Iran? Same as the American Conservative?

  3. #3
    MilitiaGuy's Avatar
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    ahmed najad is an ultra-conservative a religious conservative, yes its similar to usa conservatives but in another different form, and I think najad will work on reviving the islamic revolution and he will stick the Iranian nuclear program and he will help the youth to find better jobs and he will work on reviving the economy plus this humble man when he was a mayor he use to give money from the gov to the newly married couples so they can start their life.

  4. #4
    Tock's Avatar
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    Yah, if the religious conservatives won political power in the US to the extent they have in Iran, we'd go back to paying property taxes to support churches & preachers, we'd all have to observe the Sabbath (or else!), and would be required to attend church every sunday. Lots of other stuff, too, but you get the drift.

    Iran had the tragedy of religious conservatives take over its political system, there's no reason why it couldn't happen in the US as well. They've made lots of progress in the recent past, so, it might just be a matter of time . . .

    -Tock

  5. #5
    kis55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MilitiaGuy
    A big win for Tehran mayor in Iran elections
    The conservative Tehran mayor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad swept to a landslide win in presidential elections on Saturday.

    Ahmadinejad won the backing of the religious poor to defeat veteran political heavyweight and former Iranian president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, who was supported by pro-reform parties and wealthy Iranians.

    "The figures show that Ahmadinejad is the winner," Interior Ministry spokesman Jahanbakhsh Khanjani told reporters.

    Ahmadinejad will be Iran's first non-cleric president for 24 years when he takes office in August.

    An official at the Guardian Council, which must approve the election results, said that out of 24.8 million votes counted, Ahmadinejad had won 61.7 percent.

    Officials said turnout was about 26 million, or 56 percent, down from the 63 percent of Iran's 46.7 million eligible voters who cast ballots in the first round on June 17.

    "It's over, we accept that we've lost," said a close aide to Rafsanjani.

    Shift in power

    Although Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has the last word on all matters of state, a conservative presidency removes the moderating influence on decision-making exercised by outgoing reformist President Mohammad Khatami since 1997.

    "This all but closes the door for a breakthrough in U.S.-Iran relations," said Karim Sadjadpour, a Tehran-based analyst for the International Crisis Group.

    "I think Ahmadinejad is less amenable to compromise on the nuclear issue, but it is unclear how much influence he will have on it," he added.

    The result was a crushing blow to Rafsanjani who has been at the forefront of Iranian politics since the 1979 Islamic revolution and was widely considered Iran's second most powerful figure before the vote. His last venture to the polls in 2000 parliamentary elections also ended in failure.

    "Today is the beginning of a new political era," Ahmadinejad said after voting on Friday.

    Friday's vote exposed deep class divisions in the nation of 67 million people.

    A former member of the special forces of Iran's hardline Revolutionary Guards, Ahmadinejad's humble lifestyle and pledges to tackle corruption and redistribute the country's oil wealth appealed to the urban and rural religious poor.

    He promised the Middle East's most populous nation that oil wealth would be more fairly distributed.

    Rafsanjani, by contrast, is widely seen as being extremely wealthy -- and had struggled to win support from many voters disenchanted with Iran's political elite.

    "I vote for Ahmadinejad because he wants to…(put an end to those) who are stealing the national wealth and he wants to fight poverty," said Rahmatollah Izadpanah.

    Washington repeated its accusations that the vote was unfair due to the disqualification of more than 1,000 hopeful candidates.

    "We remain sceptical that the Iranian regime is interested in addressing either the legitimate desires of its own people or the concerns of the broader international community," said a State Department spokeswoman.

    A former two-term president, Rafsanjani is a pragmatic conservative who had proclaimed himself as being open to restoring relations with the United States and continuing reform. Some experts believe that this defeat could force him into political exile and remove what has been a moderating influence within the 26-year-old theocracy.

    Amid apparent fears of a violent reaction to the result, the Islamic republic's supreme leader Khamenei issued a decree banning the supporters of either candidate from taking to the streets later in the morning.

    The election has been seen as the most critical since the 1979 Islamic revolution, and emotions have been running high. As voting was underway Friday, the interior ministry warned that conservatives were meddling and even threatened to suspend voting in some stations.

    Rafsanjani and two beaten reformist candidates alleged that Ahmadinejad's shock first-round vote success earlier this month came thanks to orchestrated fraud carried by well-financed conservative regime elements such as the Guardians Council, the Basij group and Revolutionary Guards.



    Now thats some good news for me, I was waiting the elections results and I thought he might lose.
    Pure zionist propaganda. I think he's really a mossad agent. Who benefits if a hardliner gets into power in Iran, threatens war, builds nukes, and then the US destroys them. Clearly Israel benefits. The jews control everything.

  6. #6
    MilitiaGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kis55
    Pure zionist propaganda. I think he's really a mossad agent. Who benefits if a hardliner gets into power in Iran, threatens war, builds nukes, and then the US destroys them. Clearly Israel benefits. The jews control everything.
    Actualy you still dont know who is ahmad najad, I was concerned in the Iranian politics and I know about him befor beeing a presidental candidate this man is brave, humble and was an officer the iranian revolutionary guard plus he is very close to ayotollah khamenei so do you think khamene2i is also a zionist puppet!?
    The consequences of those election are:
    1) Unexpectedly voter turnout. This will help Iran in its international dealings.
    2) An apparent hardliner in power. This will scare the sh*t out of Europeans, and Rafsanjani can use this in order to harden Iran's stance in international affairs, in particular the nuclear negotiations. They will undoubtedly back down.
    3) Increased unity in the opposition. These elections united reformists, nationalists and general pragmatists. It is likely that during the coming years, they will all go in opposition and form a broad-based front against Ahmadinejad & Co. In other words, it might force the opposition to unify.

  7. #7
    3Vandoo's Avatar
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    Sarcasm:

    sar·casm (särkzm)
    NOUN:
    1. A cutting, often ironic remark intended to wound.
    2. A form of wit that is marked by the use of sarcastic language and is intended to make its victim the butt of contempt or ridicule.
    3. The use of sarcasm. See Synonyms at wit 1.

    ETYMOLOGY:
    Late Latin sarcasmus, from Greek sarkasmos, from sarkazein, to bite the lips in rage, from sarx , sark-, flesh

  8. #8
    BOUNCER is offline Retired Vet
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    If the eletions were fair, and I've no reason to doutb them, then I'm happy for the Iranian people too.

  9. #9
    CAUSASIAN's Avatar
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    I have a good feeling about Ahmetnajad, he is for the working class, and is a man with religious values. He will work on the Iranian economy, and help Iran. He truly belives in Islamic values, and the Islamic way of life.

    The winner of Iran's presidential election, whose landslide victory dealt a setback to reformers, said Saturday he seeks to make his country a ''modern, advanced, powerful, and Islamic'' model for the world.

    Its ironic that an Ayotallah, Ayotallah Rafsanjani, is more liberal even in the religious sense, than Ahmetnajad, who has no Islamic credentials.

  10. #10
    IronFreakX's Avatar
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    I have a feeling that iran is gonna get bombed soon did they invade a small island in iraq or smth.....

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