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  1. #1
    Jdawg50's Avatar
    Jdawg50 is offline Anabolic Member
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    Cindy Sheehan Calls For U.s To 'pull Our Troops Out Of.....

    This lady is a nut case....


    CINDY SHEEHAN CALLS FOR U.S TO 'PULL OUR TROOPS OUT OF OCCUPIED NEW ORLEANS'
    Mon Sep 12 2005 12:42:11 ET

    Celebrity anti-war protester, fresh off inking a lucrative deal with Speaker's Bureau, has demanded at the HUFFINGTON POST and MICHAEL MOORE'S website that the United States military must immediately leave 'occupied' New Orleans.

    "I don't care if a human being is black, brown, white, yellow or pink. I donŐt care if a human being is Christian, Muslim, Jew, Buddhist, or pagan. I don't care what flag a person salutes: if a human being is hungry, then it is up to another human being to feed him/her. George Bush needs to stop talking, admit the mistakes of his all around failed administration, pull our troops out of occupied New Orleans and Iraq, and excuse his self from power. The only way America will become more secure is if we have a new administration that cares about Americans even if they donŐt fall into the top two percent of the wealthiest."

    Sheehan is in the middle of a bus trip across America in support of her cause.

    Developing...

  2. #2
    ginkobulloba's Avatar
    ginkobulloba is offline Senior Member
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    Just like Andy Warhol said- in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes. True, her son died and she is emotional about that. That is understandable. I don't support this war either and I am a veteran of said war. Just like her deceased son, I joined up under my own free will. I wasn't drafted. Now she's saying the President is the one responsible for his death. Once again, I understand, she is grieving and needs a target to channel this anger she has and that happens to be our President.

    What she is doing isn't helping anyone. I'm out now, but I can only imagine what the troops think of her. Is she helping them in any way? No, she's taking her PMS bus tour all over the damn country and preaching to people just like herself, who really need to go and get themselves jobs. Her target audience is the daytime soap followed by Dr. Phil crowd and she's got about as much to say about anything as those people do. That is to say, not very much.

  3. #3
    BOUNCER is offline Retired Vet
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    Ginko, I wonder, has your time in Europe changed your views on the war in Iraq in any way. And what have you found to be people's attitudes to Americans and the war to be?.

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    Well, I can count on one hand the number of people I met in my 3 months in Europe who supported this war. None of the expats I met were supporters, in fact nearly everyone was very vocal in their dislike for the Bush admin. Only rarely did I catch any shit for simply being an American. I got into it with a Frenchman once or twice, but that's to be expected. I'm not one of those cats who travels abroad and then puts a Canadian flag on my backpack so people don't think I'm American. No, I'm still proud to be an American, just as a Frenchman is proud to be French. If someone wants to talk intelligently about any given subject, I'll give it a go, but to judge someone based entirely on their nationality is ignorant.

    One Australian friend was always saying "Man, you're not like the typical American." I asked him what a typical American is and he said "loud and arrogant." I'm willing to accept that a lot of people think that way as well, but not me. I take a person as he or she is at face value, regardless of where they come from. I met an Arab kid who sold me a cell phone and I was always joking around with this guy. He knew I was from the US and I was a soldier, but I really had no idea he was Arab. He was so nervous to tell me where he was from because he thought that it was compulsory for us to become enemies. But that wasn't the case, he told me, it made no difference and we moved on.

    By far the most moving experience of the whole journey was a trip to Poland I took with two friends of mine, who were Captains in my old unit. We all got out at the same time and are all just now experiencing our new lives. I felt it was important to see a concentration camp and they agreed. So, we went to Auschwitz-Birkenau. I really have a hard time finding words to express or describe the experience. We were all moved to our core. I read about this place in books and such, but to be there on that ground almost brought tears to my eyes.

    Everywhere I went, Bush and his policies were not popular among anyone I spoke to, with very few exceptions. A lot of people seriously hate this man. To them, he is a 21st century Hitler. Having been in Iraq during this war and then having seen the remains of Hitler's work, that judgement is simply wrong. This current war and our President may be a lot of things, but it doesn't compare to the atrocities that happened in WWII.

  5. #5
    Unoid is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ginkobulloba
    Well, I can count on one hand the number of people I met in my 3 months in Europe who supported this war. None of the expats I met were supporters, in fact nearly everyone was very vocal in their dislike for the Bush admin. Only rarely did I catch any shit for simply being an American. I got into it with a Frenchman once or twice, but that's to be expected. I'm not one of those cats who travels abroad and then puts a Canadian flag on my backpack so people don't think I'm American. No, I'm still proud to be an American, just as a Frenchman is proud to be French. If someone wants to talk intelligently about any given subject, I'll give it a go, but to judge someone based entirely on their nationality is ignorant.

    One Australian friend was always saying "Man, you're not like the typical American." I asked him what a typical American is and he said "loud and arrogant." I'm willing to accept that a lot of people think that way as well, but not me. I take a person as he or she is at face value, regardless of where they come from. I met an Arab kid who sold me a cell phone and I was always joking around with this guy. He knew I was from the US and I was a soldier, but I really had no idea he was Arab. He was so nervous to tell me where he was from because he thought that it was compulsory for us to become enemies. But that wasn't the case, he told me, it made no difference and we moved on.

    By far the most moving experience of the whole journey was a trip to Poland I took with two friends of mine, who were Captains in my old unit. We all got out at the same time and are all just now experiencing our new lives. I felt it was important to see a concentration camp and they agreed. So, we went to Auschwitz-Birkenau. I really have a hard time finding words to express or describe the experience. We were all moved to our core. I read about this place in books and such, but to be there on that ground almost brought tears to my eyes.

    Everywhere I went, Bush and his policies were not popular among anyone I spoke to, with very few exceptions. A lot of people seriously hate this man. To them, he is a 21st century Hitler. Having been in Iraq during this war and then having seen the remains of Hitler's work, that judgement is simply wrong. This current war and our President may be a lot of things, but it doesn't compare to the atrocities that happened in WWII.

    You're right, a lot of things our administration is, the most successful in time of war. COnducted the msot successful war in the hoistory of the world.
    Yet you complain and denounce him and his staff.

    Bush sure is a hitler alright. all his murdering for oil and power....

  6. #6
    BOUNCER is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unoid
    You're right, a lot of things our administration is, the most successful in time of war. COnducted the msot successful war in the hoistory of the world.
    Yet you complain and denounce him and his staff.

    Bush sure is a hitler alright. all his murdering for oil and power....


  7. #7
    Mesomorphyl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ginkobulloba
    Everywhere I went, Bush and his policies were not popular among anyone I spoke to, with very few exceptions. A lot of people seriously hate this man. To them, he is a 21st century Hitler. Having been in Iraq during this war and then having seen the remains of Hitler's work, that judgement is simply wrong. This current war and our President may be a lot of things, but it doesn't compare to the atrocities that happened in WWII.
    Our government has been hiding atrocities that they have been directly or indirectly involved in for years. We have better spin in the US because corporations own the media.

    Sheehan whether you like it or not is just exercising her right to protest.

  8. #8
    Jdawg50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mesomorphyl
    Our government has been hiding atrocities that they have been directly or indirectly involved in for years. We have better spin in the US because corporations own the media.

    Sheehan whether you like it or not is just exercising her right to protest.
    Yea, she has a right to protest....
    and I have a right to call her a nut job freako, when she says that the US military needs to leave occupied New Orleans???? LOL What a fVcking Moron.
    Sorry for her kid, but my god talk about taking that shit to the next level. Do you realise that kid signed up for a second tour, and .... and her whole family thinks she's nuts.... For gods sake her husband divorsed her a few weeks ago because she was so nuts....
    So let her speak... it only helps my platform.

  9. #9
    Jdawg50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ginkobulloba
    Well, I can count on one hand the number of people I met in my 3 months in Europe who supported this war. None of the expats I met were supporters, in fact nearly everyone was very vocal in their dislike for the Bush admin. Only rarely did I catch any shit for simply being an American. I got into it with a Frenchman once or twice, but that's to be expected. I'm not one of those cats who travels abroad and then puts a Canadian flag on my backpack so people don't think I'm American. No, I'm still proud to be an American, just as a Frenchman is proud to be French. If someone wants to talk intelligently about any given subject, I'll give it a go, but to judge someone based entirely on their nationality is ignorant.

    One Australian friend was always saying "Man, you're not like the typical American." I asked him what a typical American is and he said "loud and arrogant." I'm willing to accept that a lot of people think that way as well, but not me. I take a person as he or she is at face value, regardless of where they come from. I met an Arab kid who sold me a cell phone and I was always joking around with this guy. He knew I was from the US and I was a soldier, but I really had no idea he was Arab. He was so nervous to tell me where he was from because he thought that it was compulsory for us to become enemies. But that wasn't the case, he told me, it made no difference and we moved on.

    By far the most moving experience of the whole journey was a trip to Poland I took with two friends of mine, who were Captains in my old unit. We all got out at the same time and are all just now experiencing our new lives. I felt it was important to see a concentration camp and they agreed. So, we went to Auschwitz-Birkenau. I really have a hard time finding words to express or describe the experience. We were all moved to our core. I read about this place in books and such, but to be there on that ground almost brought tears to my eyes.

    Everywhere I went, Bush and his policies were not popular among anyone I spoke to, with very few exceptions. A lot of people seriously hate this man. To them, he is a 21st century Hitler. Having been in Iraq during this war and then having seen the remains of Hitler's work, that judgement is simply wrong. This current war and our President may be a lot of things, but it doesn't compare to the atrocities that happened in WWII.

    Why should be give a shit what the europeans think...
    Remeber WWII, This entire situation with terrorism is very annolgus. during WWII, the French and everyone else, stuck their heads in the sand and hoped this Hitler guy would just go away..... Then what happened?

    The same exact thing is happening right now.

    This is what the former president of Spain has to say about what needs to be done to win WWIV.....

    Cooperation Key to Ending Terrorism, Aznar Says
    Stressing the importance of international cooperation in the fight against terrorism, former Spanish President José María Aznar told a Gaston Hall audience on Sept. 21 that violence has to be condemned everywhere, not by just a few governments.

    "We are not in an optional war," he said. "The terms have not been defined by ourselves but by our enemy. ... We're all in the same boat."

    Throughout the speech, the first in a series of 12 that he will give during the next three years, Aznar echoed the message of U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, who addressed trans-Atlantic relations from Gaston Hall on Sept. 10.

    With a strict policy of containment, Aznar said, democratic countries could deny terrorist organizations access to resources, increasingly important as terrorists operate in cells all over the world.

    "We must understand that we're fighting not against a group but an ideology," he said. "The terrorists are not the end of the problem; we must also fight the cause."

    The event marked Aznar's first lecture under his new appointment as Distinguished Scholar in the Practice of Global Leadership. He served as Spain's president from 1996 to April 2004.

    Although his comments during the lecture covered terrorism in a global sense, he briefly mentioned his own experiences with violence while president, including challenges with the Basque Fatherland and Liberty (ETA) organization and the March 11 bombings of commuter trains in Madrid.

    The Madrid attack happened just a few days before the national elections in Spain, and Aznar warned that something similar could happen in the United States before its presidential election.

    "I believe the terrorists will wish to be present at the November election, either through direct actions here in America or indirectly," he said.

    Terrorism, he said, is "the worst threat to freedom today" because terrorist leaders have made it clear that "there is neither room for negotiations nor peace agreements."

    He advocated the need to create a collective, worldwide list of groups to watch. "A terrorist is a terrorist. There are no exceptions," he said.

    In his new role on the Hilltop, Aznar will spend extended periods of time on Main Campus in November, February and April. In addition to giving university addresses on European politics and trans-Atlantic relations, he will serve as a guest lecturer in foreign service classes.

    The former head of state said in an interview after the speech that he is excited for the opportunity to be in the classroom. As guest lecturer, he said, he would like to give introductory remarks and then engage in open discussions with the students.

    "For me, it is very, very important to listen to the things the students have to say," he said. "Because in government, I learned from many, many people and did many, many things, but [didn't] have time usually for that. ... And I am very interested" to talk with students.

    http://www1.georgetown.edu/explore/n...ocumentID=1224

    Not sure if any of you have been watching, but it looks like the next president of Germany will probably be a conservative... Hopefully she will change that way thing are heading in that country...

  10. #10
    ginkobulloba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mesomorphyl
    Our government has been hiding atrocities that they have been directly or indirectly involved in for years. We have better spin in the US because corporations own the media.

    Sheehan whether you like it or not is just exercising her right to protest.
    We're in agreement on both subjects.

  11. #11
    Mesomorphyl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdawg50
    Yea, she has a right to protest....
    and I have a right to call her a nut job freako, when she says that the US military needs to leave occupied New Orleans???? LOL What a fVcking Moron.
    Sorry for her kid, but my god talk about taking that shit to the next level. Do you realise that kid signed up for a second tour, and .... and her whole family thinks she's nuts.... For gods sake her husband divorsed her a few weeks ago because she was so nuts....
    So let her speak... it only helps my platform.
    Yes you also have that right. Maybe on the military occupation she feels this will lead to marshal law in all major cities after the news and government says how wonderful it works.

    People may think she is nuts and extreme... but so was Thomas Jefferson " The tree of liberty needs to be refreshed from time to time with the blood of both patriots and tyrants." How about Patrick Henry "Give me liberty or give me death." Do those people sound extreme? Read Thomas Paines Common Sense and for goodness sakes The Declaration of Independence. Sheehan becomes pretty mild.

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