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  1. #1
    Squatman51's Avatar
    Squatman51 is offline Senior Member
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    Just had school maxouts today

    We just had our maxouts today and I have a question about my bench I can get 225 for 13 but can only get 300 once. The calculations say i should get around 350. I dont no what the deal is. My other lifts were a 300 clean and 655 squat.

  2. #2
    kdawg21's Avatar
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    Check your charts again.

  3. #3
    IronReload04's Avatar
    IronReload04 is offline "Rancid Protein Powder Mastermind Technician"
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    looks about right. 225 for 10 is 290. anything over 10 reps is probably not that accurate anyway

  4. #4
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    charts are 100% bull****. if you push 13 reps using 100% of your ability, then try to max, your definitly gonna lose power. warming up is a crucial game.

  5. #5
    Psychotron's Avatar
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    they are more and more accurate the lower the reps are.

  6. #6
    IronReload04's Avatar
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    the one has been bullseye for me. every time i max out it is what the chart sais.

  7. #7
    IronReload04's Avatar
    IronReload04 is offline "Rancid Protein Powder Mastermind Technician"
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdawg21
    Check your charts again.
    anyway, 225 for 13 is miles and miles away from 350. dude, 225 for 13 is like 305-310

  8. #8
    Powrlftr is offline Associate Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squatman51
    We just had our maxouts today and I have a question about my bench I can get 225 for 13 but can only get 300 once. The calculations say i should get around 350. I dont no what the deal is. My other lifts were a 300 clean and 655 squat.
    If you've been doing all your bench training in the 6-8 rep range or higher without ever doing any triples, doubles or singles you will be better at doing reps and your max will be less than you expected. You need to get your nervous system used to the heavier loads or they just wont respond with maximal force when you need it, that's why you do a peaking routine before a meet so you go in ready to max.

  9. #9
    Anhydro78's Avatar
    Anhydro78 is offline Anabolic Member
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    The 1 Rep max calculaters have allways been right on with me.

    If you are intrested in strength I dont see why you would be benching in the rep range you have given. Try this rep scheme for a while and see what happens.

    5/4/3/1

  10. #10
    9000rpm's Avatar
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    That charts have always been pretty close for me too. I agree with Powrlftr, you need to get your muscles used to the heavier weight. Get a good strong spotter and load up more weight than you can do. Practice with that weight for some negatives so you can get a feel for the extra weight, and before you know it, you will be moving up again.

  11. #11
    ColdSore's Avatar
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    it all depends on your dominant muscle fiber type...

  12. #12
    Hollisxrbc is offline New Member
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    your 1rm doesnt sound too far off, I get 225 for about 8 reps and and do right at 290 for a 1rm

  13. #13
    Hollisxrbc is offline New Member
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    Sorr for vagueness on last post, i say about 8 reps and right at 290 cuz when im not fully ready its less on both, but when i go in fresh its those exactly

  14. #14
    weightshead is offline Associate Member
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    the higher the number of reps you use in the calculation the more inaccurate the max prediction will be.

    aside from this if you do not train heavy triples/doubles/singles you can not expect you 1RM to be at its best. the body adapts to the training you put it through.

  15. #15
    Jackster is offline New Member
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    Talking Ok?

    I'm new to this site but I'm only 17 years old alright. I don't believe in the charts cause I can only get 225 about 7-8 times and can only bench 285lbs. I'm goping for 290 today so don't feel bad about that at all. Just keep on training. Don't just limit yourself to some stupid chart that says where your supposed to be cause everyone is different.

  16. #16
    Velkar182 is offline Banned
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    My opinion is that if you are properly powerlifting, those charts shouldn't apply at all. The amount of force and work over a given time (power output) have nothing to do with a muscles ability to generate the same force over a period for many reps. It's same as saying if you run the marathon in under 2 hrs, you can run the 100m in 9.9s. Makes no sense to use this line of logic. Glycogen levels, bodily PH, hydration and things like this are more of a factor in high rep lifting. I know a couple of U. Pitt linemen than can get 315 for 18 reps and they can't even bench 450. The 10 pounds per rep rule (each rep adds 10 lbs to your expected max) is absolute hog wash. I personally have as difficult of a time benching lower 500's as I do with upper 400's. Part of this has to do with inadequate Dynamic Effort training. Just because someone can move a light bar fast enough that momentum has a lot to do with it, that doesn't mean they can generate the force reuired to move the chart's expected weight.

  17. #17
    Doc.Sust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velkar182
    My opinion is that if you are properly powerlifting, those charts shouldn't apply at all. The amount of force and work over a given time (power output) have nothing to do with a muscles ability to generate the same force over a period for many reps. It's same as saying if you run the marathon in under 2 hrs, you can run the 100m in 9.9s. Makes no sense to use this line of logic. Glycogen levels, bodily PH, hydration and things like this are more of a factor in high rep lifting. I know a couple of U. Pitt linemen than can get 315 for 18 reps and they can't even bench 450. The 10 pounds per rep rule (each rep adds 10 lbs to your expected max) is absolute hog wash. I personally have as difficult of a time benching lower 500's as I do with upper 400's. Part of this has to do with inadequate Dynamic Effort training. Just because someone can move a light bar fast enough that momentum has a lot to do with it, that doesn't mean they can generate the force reuired to move the chart's expected weight.
    agree!

  18. #18
    OldPLer's Avatar
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    This is a pretty accurate chart, but you have to get used to heavy weights. As you notice they dont even go above 5 reps because it can not be accurate with higher reps.
    Take your best and multiply it by the numbers given.

    2 reps - ? x 1.06
    3 reps - ? x 1.12
    4 reps - ? x 1.15
    5 reps - ? x 1.18

  19. #19
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    I'm not a fan of the charts or calculators either. Mainly because tens of hundreds of factors come into play. Just to throw a few out there...

    a.) did you train the day before
    b.) did you warm up
    c.) are you low on calories
    d.) are you sick

    I'm sure every little question can come into play. There's day I can deadlift 350lbs. max and there's days I'm too lazy to pick up 225. Just depends on the factors. Don't let it get to you though. 300lbs. is a damn good bench.

  20. #20
    powerliftmike's Avatar
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    Awesome squat bro. Was that raw?

  21. #21
    Doc.Sust's Avatar
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    what your body weight?

  22. #22
    bukipower is offline New Member
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    Well the reason why the chart is off is because you probably have better muscular endurance rather than having more just "brute" strength. For example I can out bench my buddy by probably 30 pounds on our 1 rep max. However, whenever we do reps with 225 he's right there with me. Prolly jus has more to do with your fiber types. The charts definatly favor kids with fast twitch fibers.

    Oh Yeah and I'm not one of them fast twitch kids so i don't even look at charts! lol.

  23. #23
    matt23 is offline New Member
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    I love the max calculator. I use it to determine my opener and my goals for each competition. For example, before my first competition i hit 175 for 5 or 6 on a good day and with the max calculator I use, which I have found to be far more accurate than any others online, 5 reps came to a max of 201.25 and 6 came to 206.5. I hit 203lbs at the meet. Before my recent competition, I hit 175lbs for 9, which comes to a 222.25lb max. At the meet i hit 220lbs. So as you can see the caluclator is very accurate for me. As far as the 350, which calculator did you use? That's highly inaccurate. Don't cancel out the 1 rep max calculator just yet. Next time try: Weight*Reps*.03+Initial Weight. 225 for 13 comes to 312.75 and if you did the 225 for 13 right before you maxed, that would explain a lot, otherwise I would say the calculator is inaccurate over 10 reps.

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