Anabolics
Search More Than 6,000,000 Posts
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    kdawg21's Avatar
    kdawg21 is offline Associate Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern Hemisphere
    Posts
    492

    Periodized and Overload training

    It has been my personal experience that periodized training and progressive overload training are a complete waste of time. Periodized training, while it may appear to be a good idea, gives the muscles enough time to rest but lacks a certain inensity. Progressive overload training fatigues the muscles but the nervous system becomes unresponsive to any change after several weeks. However, a combination of (blood) volume training and plyometrics seem to yield the best results. I would further encourage others reading this to invest in a good set of Rubber bands and chains for further speed training. Let us not forget that powerlifting follows the same laws of physics that the rest of the universe follows. The idea is that F=MA. The more bar speed one can generate, the more he/she will be able to lift. Do not worry about how much body weight you gain as there is a direct correlation between muscle size/density and the training load that muscle can handle. Above all, always remember that powerlifting is nothing but physics and biomechanics.

  2. #2
    jbrand's Avatar
    jbrand is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    760
    Quote Originally Posted by kdawg21
    It has been my personal experience that periodized training and progressive overload training are a complete waste of time. Periodized training, while it may appear to be a good idea, gives the muscles enough time to rest but lacks a certain inensity. Progressive overload training fatigues the muscles but the nervous system becomes unresponsive to any change after several weeks. However, a combination of (blood) volume training and plyometrics seem to yield the best results. I would further encourage others reading this to invest in a good set of Rubber bands and chains for further speed training. Let us not forget that powerlifting follows the same laws of physics that the rest of the universe follows. The idea is that F=MA. The more bar speed one can generate, the more he/she will be able to lift. Do not worry about how much body weight you gain as there is a direct correlation between muscle size/density and the training load that muscle can handle. Above all, always remember that powerlifting is nothing but physics and biomechanics.

    Periodization doesn't have to lack intensity, the beauty of periodization is the ability to alter intensity via a variety of loading parameters. I agree in that progressive overload is only possible to a certain extent within a given set of training variables, but I have found that by using a periodized approach I can get past the limitations of the CNS. For example, periods of high volume at a lower RM% followed by periods of low volume at a higher RM%. Any change in 1RM may not be evident for several weeks/months but I have found that the progress does come.

    I like your approach of volume training/plyometrics though, I find that too many people spend hours in the gym strictly for vanity and don't progress their actual athletic potential. I also set goals based on training loads rather than sheer muscle size, I also feel it's a much better indicator of progress and just a more practical way of setting goals. Good post.

  3. #3
    kdawg21's Avatar
    kdawg21 is offline Associate Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern Hemisphere
    Posts
    492
    Perhaps I was a little hasty in judging the effects of periodized training. Many Eastern European lifters were using it before the creation of modern anabolics. However, the point of periodization training was to keep the body in a constant state of growth without "overtraining," by gradaully increasing the load and intensity. The point is to approach your training limit but never exceed it. Studies have shown that overtraining leads to an increase in the amount of cortisol released by the adrenal glands, cortisol inhibits muscle growth and forces the body into a catabolic state. However, with the proper use of modern medicine, on can supress the cortisol prouction which will allow one to constantly push his/her body to the limit. While the premise of periodized training is a good one, and it has produced results, I fail to understand its use in an "enhanced" athlete. I gladly welcome any rebuttals or counterpoints. It is not my intention to squabble, I simply endeavor to gain a better understanding of proper training techniques and ideas.

  4. #4
    jbrand's Avatar
    jbrand is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    760
    Quote Originally Posted by kdawg21
    Perhaps I was a little hasty in judging the effects of periodized training. Many Eastern European lifters were using it before the creation of modern anabolics. However, the point of periodization training was to keep the body in a constant state of growth without "overtraining," by gradaully increasing the load and intensity. The point is to approach your training limit but never exceed it. Studies have shown that overtraining leads to an increase in the amount of cortisol released by the adrenal glands, cortisol inhibits muscle growth and forces the body into a catabolic state. However, with the proper use of modern medicine, on can supress the cortisol prouction which will allow one to constantly push his/her body to the limit. While the premise of periodized training is a good one, and it has produced results, I fail to understand its use in an "enhanced" athlete. I gladly welcome any rebuttals or counterpoints. It is not my intention to squabble, I simply endeavor to gain a better understanding of proper training techniques and ideas.
    Great points you bring up. I also agree that a periodized training protocol does take certain precautions to limit overtraining. Although such strength coaches such as Poliquin feel that the body is capable of doing some remarkable levels of intensity AND volume if brought at a reasonable pace. If you look at some of Poliquin's advanced programs, it's almost amazing what the body can be trained to handle at a certain level of personal fitness via periodization. From my experience and from what I have read, overtraining is the biggest threat when training variables are altered to an extreme too fast. For example, by simply deciding to double ones training volume out of the blue but by leaving all other parametres constant it can really become a disaster as the CNS can only handle a certain degree of added stress in a limited time frame, which of course varies between individuals with different genetics and training history. You bring up a valid point though, drug-trained athletes generally have the advantage to not having to worry about altering volume and intensity in a faster fashion than non-'enhanced' ones, although I feel that many of the old Eastern Bloc training methods were actually based around the drug regimen of some of these Olympic level athletes. Take German Volume Training for example, the Eastern coaches actually subscribed to a notion of pre-planned overtraining with a 10x10 protocol simply to cash in on the rewards after several weeks when the body returns to a normal state with lower volume where strength gains were shown to go through the roof!

  5. #5
    slobberknocker's Avatar
    slobberknocker is offline Associate Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    386
    Progressive overload works for me if I keep volume low.

  6. #6
    RoNNy THe BuLL's Avatar
    RoNNy THe BuLL is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    2,968
    Periodization is an awesome method if you ask me. The cycles and phases give your body the much need rest and variety that will help stimulate growth and strength. I'm not a power lifter, but I've heard the phrase "2 steps forward, 1 step back". I haven't personally done periodization training, but I'm very familiar with it. With little altercations here and there, I'm sure we could come up with something that would be an offshoot of Periodization training that would be more effective. Anyone up for it? I am.

  7. #7
    RoNNy THe BuLL's Avatar
    RoNNy THe BuLL is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    2,968

  8. #8
    powerlifter's Avatar
    powerlifter is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,651
    Ronny - nice link

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •