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  1. #1
    se11 is offline Associate Member
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    Heavy Negitaves on Bicep workout

    In my bicep workouts, I like to do heavy seated hammer curls with negitaves(if you read M&F, you'd probally have seen this in like last months issue). I decided to add it into my workout and I like doing one really heavy set. But, when should I do it? Should I begin with it, or do it second. I tried doing it third and couldn't get all 8 reps in. This is my usual workout, allthough I often change it around to not get bored:

    Incline Curls or Standing Barbell Curls(2 warm up + 3 regular)
    Seated Dumbell Curls or Standing Dumbell Curls(3 sets)
    -Heavy Negitaves 1 set(I tried it doesn't work, so I need to change it up)
    Standing Hammer Curls(2 sets)
    Concentration Curls(2 sets)

    Where do you think the heavy negitaves would fit in best I usually work my bi's once every 5-6 days. Can anyone help me out? thnx

  2. #2
    spywizard's Avatar
    spywizard is offline AR-Elite Hall of Famer~
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    have you read anythiing on static training???

    1-2 rep max............ and the next day you wont be able to bend your arms..

    jmo and experience..

    if you can do a heavy neg at the begining.. you aren't exerting enough....

    but then if i don't pop a blood vessel.. i need to add 10 lbs to the lift... be safe
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  3. #3
    se11 is offline Associate Member
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    im not talking about like extreme heavy, im talkin about just enough to get 5-6 reps and then 2-3 forced onces, im not planning on doing 1-2 and not being able to move the next day

  4. #4
    AandF6969's Avatar
    AandF6969 is offline Made Up Of Wires
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    Quote Originally Posted by se11
    im not planning on doing 1-2 and not being able to move the next day
    Why the hell not? It's sweet!

  5. #5
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    Warrior is offline AR-Hall of Famer
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    From:The Root of Contraction

    "there are three types of muscular failure... 1) concentric failure - simply means you can't lift the weight again. 2) static failure - your muscles are so wiped out that you can't even hold the weight statically at any point in the range of motion. 3) eccentric failure - this the point where you can't control the weight as you lower it, regardless of what tempo you're using. Going to static failure places a greater demand on your body (a greater training stimulis), rather than simply stopping when you can't push or pull anymore." Me

    Because eccentric failure should lead you to total failure - I would place it at the end of your routine. Unless you final movement is not a free weight exercise...

  6. #6
    se11 is offline Associate Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior
    From:The Root of Contraction

    "there are three types of muscular failure... 1) concentric failure - simply means you can't lift the weight again. 2) static failure - your muscles are so wiped out that you can't even hold the weight statically at any point in the range of motion. 3) eccentric failure - this the point where you can't control the weight as you lower it, regardless of what tempo you're using. Going to static failure places a greater demand on your body (a greater training stimulis), rather than simply stopping when you can't push or pull anymore." Me

    Because eccentric failure should lead you to total failure - I would place it at the end of your routine. Unless you final movement is not a free weight exercise...

    ok thanks, this helped alot

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