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  1. #1
    biggun24 is offline Associate Member
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    chest workout question

    is it best to do flatbench barbell presses along with incline dumbbell presses for about 3 or 4 weeks then switch to flatbench dumbbell presses along with incline barbell presses, or just do both flat and incline dumbell and barbel??

  2. #2
    Kaleb is offline Associate Member
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    I've been doing flat bench BB with incline dumbells for about 3 months now. Incline barbell absolutely tears my rotator cuff up. I'm in excruciating pain when I do incline BB. Hammer strength also makes a killer incline press.. It's all what is best for you.

  3. #3
    StevePJC's Avatar
    StevePJC is offline Member
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    Why nothing decline?

  4. #4
    ImmmtheIceman's Avatar
    ImmmtheIceman is offline Senior Member
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    I feel that alot of people dont like decline. Workouts in magazines never seem to incorporate that, but its my favorite chest exercise.

  5. #5
    se11 is offline Associate Member
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    I never really have done declines all that much either, I've always thought they were like specifically for more advanced body builders

  6. #6
    BASK8KACE is offline Anabolic Member
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    If you don't like declines you can do dips instead.

    I'd stick with incline and flat dumbbell presses and use decline once in a wile for variety.

    I don't like barbells. The restricted motion of the bar puts far too much stress on my shoulders. I can only do barbell presses for a few weeks, then my shouders begin to feel odd--in a bad way (light throbbing pain here and there). I stayed away from barbells for over a year after my bursitis rehab (from barbell pressing AND playing racquetball frequently). I switched back to barbells over a year after full recovery and within 5 weeks, I was feeling too much stress on my shoulders while using barbells.

    I will be using dumbbells for chest pressing movements from now on. Dumbbells do not restrict my motion; they allow me to move each arm in it's own natural arc, which eliminates/minimizes unnecessary stresson my shoulders.

  7. #7
    ripped525 is offline Junior Member
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    i switch it up every week
    week one i do flat BB incline DB
    week 2 i do incline BB flat DB
    i feel for me this is the best way to go , experiment till u find out whats best for you, and if u have shoulder pains after doin incline presses then the bench is probally too high up a 30 degree incline is the furthest u should go

  8. #8
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by BASK8KACE
    If you don't like declines you can do dips instead.
    Could you explain this in a little greater detail Bask8kace?

  9. #9
    BASK8KACE is offline Anabolic Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blown_SC
    Could you explain this in a little greater detail Bask8kace?
    There are several different exercises for each muscle group.

    To work the biceps, you have the group called curls (hammer, revers, standing, concentration, preacher, etcetera). Each one of these curls will work the biceps.

    To work the back, you have various rows (upright, bent over, seated cable, T-bar, one-arm, etcetera).

    To work the chest, you have a group called presses (flat bench, incline, decline, dips) Of course there are other exercises for chest such as the group of flyes (dumbbell, cable cross overs, machine [aka pec deck], etcetera)

    When working back you can do T-bar rows for back or you can do seated cable rows to hit the same spot on the back. Similarly, when working the chest, you have choices of which exercises to use to hit various parts of the chest. When done correctly* dips (and weighted dips)** can be an excellent substitute for decline bench.

    Weighted dips: most gyms have a belt with a chain on it that you can place around your waist in order to hang a 25lb plate or 45lb plate to ad weight to your dips.

    * --NOTE 1: When doing dips for chest, lean forward slightly to put more stress on the chest and slightly less on the triceps. When doing dips mainly for triceps, you have a choice: (1) keep your back straight and do not lean forward at all (back remains perpindicular to floor) or (2) use bench dips--put legs on one bench, hands on another with about 4 feet of space between the two benches, have someon place plates on your lap and do dips.

    IMPORTANT: When doing dips it is important that your upper arm (tricepts) do NOT go below parallel. Going below parallel puts excessive stress on your shoulders and you elbows. One of the reason for substituting dips for decline bench presses is to put less stress on your shoulders, so make sure you accomplish the goal of protecting your joints by doing the exercise correctly.

    **--NOTE 2: I prefer to do dips at the end of the workout so the chest is pre-fatigued. That way I can hang less weight around my waist when doing dips. If I did dips at the beginning of the workout, I'd have to hang too much weight around my waist to get the same workout.

  10. #10
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Great bro... thanks, explained exactly what I wanted to know

    Quote Originally Posted by BASK8KACE
    There are several different exercises for each muscle group.

    To work the biceps, you have the group called curls (hammer, revers, standing, concentration, preacher, etcetera). Each one of these curls will work the biceps.

    To work the back, you have various rows (upright, bent over, seated cable, T-bar, one-arm, etcetera).

    To work the chest, you have a group called presses (flat bench, incline, decline, dips) Of course there are other exercises for chest such as the group of flyes (dumbbell, cable cross overs, machine [aka pec deck], etcetera)

    When working back you can do T-bar rows for back or you can do seated cable rows to hit the same spot on the back. Similarly, when working the chest, you have choices of which exercises to use to hit various parts of the chest. When done correctly* dips (and weighted dips)** can be an excellent substitute for decline bench.

    Weighted dips: most gyms have a belt with a chain on it that you can place around your waist in order to hang a 25lb plate or 45lb plate to ad weight to your dips.

    * --NOTE 1: When doing dips for chest, lean forward slightly to put more stress on the chest and slightly less on the triceps. When doing dips mainly for triceps, you have a choice: (1) keep your back straight and do not lean forward at all (back remains perpindicular to floor) or (2) use bench dips--put legs on one bench, hands on another with about 4 feet of space between the two benches, have someon place plates on your lap and do dips.

    IMPORTANT: When doing dips it is important that your upper arm (tricepts) do NOT go below parallel. Going below parallel puts excessive stress on your shoulders and you elbows. One of the reason for substituting dips for decline bench presses is to put less stress on your shoulders, so make sure you accomplish the goal of protecting your joints by doing the exercise correctly.

    **--NOTE 2: I prefer to do dips at the end of the workout so the chest is pre-fatigued. That way I can hang less weight around my waist when doing dips. If I did dips at the beginning of the workout, I'd have to hang too much weight around my waist to get the same workout.

  11. #11
    63190's Avatar
    63190 is offline Anabolic Member
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    Aren't the elbows supposed to be out to the sides for chest and not close to your body as you go down?

  12. #12
    Duma's Avatar
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    generally for chest---elbows sprayed out

    tri's---elbows in close near ribcage

  13. #13
    BASK8KACE is offline Anabolic Member
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    You have to do what works for you. I use a medium to wide grip. I've found that leaning forward makes more of a difference (hits chest harder) for me than my elbow placement. But that doesn't mean my way is the only way that works.

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=BASK8KACE] I've found that leaning forward makes more of a difference (hits chest harder) for me than my elbow placement. QUOTE]

    Agreed

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