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  1. #1
    guest589745 is offline 2/3 Deca 1/3 Test
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    how do you stop the shaking?

    I have been working out for a while, I am decently strong but whenever I bench lately I shake. Is this because it is too heavy and I should lower the weight or what? It has me thinking i have underdeveloped connective tissue.

  2. #2
    chest6's Avatar
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    its your rotator cuff.

  3. #3
    guest589745 is offline 2/3 Deca 1/3 Test
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    oh dude, are you friggin psychic?! I have dislocated my shoulder 6 times. I can still lift with little or no pain though, so WTF? What can I do? I take glucosamine/chondroitin, zinc magnesium, glutamine, Bcomplex and a decent diet. Am I basically screwed until I get surgery?

  4. #4
    chest6's Avatar
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    i am psychic....
    do work with elastic bands
    do inward and outward rotation
    keep your right elbow against your hip..arm at a 90 degree angle..forearm parallel with the floor. rotate your your forearm towards your body..do the opposite for right arm and do both for left arm

    This make sense?? I am sure you have done these before

  5. #5
    guest589745 is offline 2/3 Deca 1/3 Test
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    yes I have, but I gotta lift the weights too. You arent sayin I should stop all together doin shoulder exercies like laterals and stuff are you?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skullsmasher
    yes I have, but I gotta lift the weights too.
    well of course and do light dumbbell work..its very similar to baseball exercises baseball pitchers do..

  7. #7
    needmorestrength's Avatar
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    Its not your rotator cuff, I bet that everyone shakes with a barbell!! My gym owner even shakes at low weight. What I have been led to believe is that its your stabalizer muscles, I notice that since I do mainly dumbell movements for chest, when I go back to bar I no longer have that problem, except with heavy weight.

  8. #8
    chest6's Avatar
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    I never shake? I have been told by countless people and there is definitely a connection with a non functionally fit rotator cuff and not being able to stop from shaking. Rotator cuff is part of the stabalizer muscles

  9. #9
    guest589745 is offline 2/3 Deca 1/3 Test
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    I used to be able to toss the 45s up and down, but now I can bench em almost as many times I just shake a little.

  10. #10
    GirlyGirl is offline Female Member
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    Yes, the rotator cuff are stabilizing muscles, and yes, weakness in them will make you shake more with dumbbells, and you see it more with dumbbells than the bar becuase you can compensate more easily with the stronger side using the bar. So do the band exercises, continue doing the rest of your routine but lighten up for a while, and if you feel pain-STOP!!!

  11. #11
    guest589745 is offline 2/3 Deca 1/3 Test
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    Its the exact opposite with me, I shake more with barbell bench than dumbells. Thanks to everyone so far.

  12. #12
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    i used to shake as well when i did chest, i asked a fitness trainer about it. they said it was because after i did the workout i would get up and walk around and spot my workout partner. since i was standing all the blood would rush to my legs, and away from the muscle i was working out. then i would sit down again and do the exercise. the trainer recommended staying on the bench btwn sets and keeping the blood in the same area, and that would prevent shaking. it seems to work for me, you might want to give it a try......

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by davieric
    i used to shake as well when i did chest, i asked a fitness trainer about it. they said it was because after i did the workout i would get up and walk around and spot my workout partner. since i was standing all the blood would rush to my legs, and away from the muscle i was working out. then i would sit down again and do the exercise. the trainer recommended staying on the bench btwn sets and keeping the blood in the same area, and that would prevent shaking. it seems to work for me, you might want to give it a try......
    Whoa smart guy here...Watch out!

    -Bino

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    it could honestly be your forearms, mine are tremendously small compared to my arms, add that to my small bone structure and i had the same problem. if it turns out not to be the forearms you have to realize its those smaller stabilizer muscles....

  15. #15
    chest6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davieric
    i used to shake as well when i did chest, i asked a fitness trainer about it. they said it was because after i did the workout i would get up and walk around and spot my workout partner. since i was standing all the blood would rush to my legs, and away from the muscle i was working out. then i would sit down again and do the exercise. the trainer recommended staying on the bench btwn sets and keeping the blood in the same area, and that would prevent shaking. it seems to work for me, you might want to give it a try......
    ya that does sound smart

  16. #16
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    I always thou8ght it was from a poor cns connection. That when you have a new exercise or over stimulate your cns you get the shakes while under a load. I can remember first doing squats and shaking all the way top the floor. I think you may be over training a bit, or under nurishing your muscles.

  17. #17
    Duck of Death's Avatar
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    ....What you are experiencing is post-contraction muscle fasciculation, which occurs after the muscle fibers have been pushed hard with maximal contraction. The neuro-muscular junction tries very hard to re-establish chemical balance and tonic sub-threshold contractions occur, which are manifested as "shaking". Don't you notice after a hard leg workout, your legs shake like this?? This is entirely normal and is an indication that you have pushed the muscle(s) hard - be happy!

  18. #18
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    if u had, or have weak connective tissue.. it would tear... you have weaker stabilizer muscles...

  19. #19
    guest589745 is offline 2/3 Deca 1/3 Test
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    Well, let me tell you all some more info;

    I only notice the shaking when doing flat barbell bench.
    it doesnt mater what set it is, first or last, it is always there. I dont know of any other exercise I do that causes me to shake while performing it.

    This doesnt necessarily mean that i should stop doing it right?


    Thanks.

  20. #20
    Flexor is offline Banned
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    High loads are responsible for shaking besides rotator cuff injury. Also when you get progressively more tired the muscles become uncoordinated as motor units fire less reliably.

    Besides huge muscles like the quads, chest, back and triceps all have multisynaptic bipolar neurons which means more muscle cells per nerve cell, hence decreased coordination.

    The eye muscles or even the finger flexors and extensors have much fewer muscle cells per nerve cell which is why their movements are so precise

    But in this case...its clearly got nothing to do with your problem.

    I would say though that its odd you don't get shaking with overhead presses because that is another exercise that would be badly affected by a damaged rotator cuff.

  21. #21
    gettankd's Avatar
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    I used to notice shaking. Now it's only with heavy weights. I'd say use DB for a weeks and go back to bar and see if it's still there.

  22. #22
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    It's your central nervous system. You are lifting weights that your CNS is not adapted to yet so it's almost randomly firing your muscle fibers. As you get stronger you won't shake anymore.

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