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  1. #1
    big N's Avatar
    big N is offline Anabolic Member
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    strained rotator cuff!

    two weeks i starined my rotatorcuff doing shoulders ,the thing is it was light day ,and i felt nithing just when the muscle got cold it hurt like u wouldnt beleive ,i calle the doc he said its strained ,stay off it 7-12 days ,well its gone now but sill pinches a little whan i lift something awkwardly .does this shit go away ,has it happened to anyone else ,and does juice help in healing ?

  2. #2
    yellows2k is offline Member
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    I take glucosamine chondroitin for my rotator cuff pains and it seems to have gone away.

  3. #3
    newguy2003 is offline New Member
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    i take edotolac for mine

  4. #4
    zzo18's Avatar
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    Big N,
    The same thing happened to me. Like yellows2k said, glucosamine chondroitin really helps. My doc recommended it to me and its worked wonders. I got 2 bottles of it for abour $25. In my situation, a good investment...
    Good luck!
    -zzo

  5. #5
    big N's Avatar
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    im on it bros im like triple dosing the glucasamine /condodritin, whats edotalac???

  6. #6
    GUYVER's Avatar
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    Glucosamine and chondroitin are for regenerating the cartilages. Rotator cuffs injuries are mostly due to muscle inflammation. So in this case, those supplements wouldn't help. Take something to mask the pain is a short-term solution to a long-term problem. You'd be better off trying to locate the injuried area, which indicates muscular weakness, and try to customize your training to specifically rectify the imbalances of the rotators. You'd probably need to seek a professional to do a postural assessement on you to locate the problem area(s). It could be some overlooked problems such as the gait cycle, which can affect your entire body balance from the feet and up. Your body is a kinetic chain, it doesn't care if something's off and it wouldn't bother to tell you, all it cares is to allow you to carry on with your daily living by modifying your physiological structures. And that change will eventually catch up to you one day.

  7. #7
    DN50 is offline New Member
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    good point, what kind of doctor would be best to assess a shoulder injury?

  8. #8
    GUYVER's Avatar
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    Forget about the doc's, most of them don't know much about this topic really. IMO, the only people that can shed a light on this area is a good biomechanic specialist and/or someone that knows MAT, Muscle Activation Techniques. These professionals really know their shit. I've had the opportunity to work with one of them and I was amazed and impressed by his knowledge and what he could do. He basically did some assessements on me and located my weaknesses (quite a few, in fact), and then he taught me some basic MAT to bring up those lagging muscles. If you are interested and want more info on it just pm me.
    Last edited by GUYVER; 01-27-2003 at 04:36 PM.

  9. #9
    newguy2003 is offline New Member
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    etodolac is a prescription anti-inflamatory

  10. #10
    brad fuel's Avatar
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    possibly impingement syndrome. Thats when the tendon of the Supraspinatus is inflammed so it pinches under the AC joint. Find a good athletic training book and look up a functional test called "Open Cans Test"
    Basically put your arms out to the side and raise them to about 90 degrees with your body. Then turn your thumbs so they face down, you can bend your elbow a bit so your is a bit more infront of you. Then have someone press down on both arms. One will be significantly weaker and more painful.
    I agree family doctors probably aren't too familiar with biomechanics, you're better off to see a physiotherapist or a good athletic trainer.

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