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  1. #1
    mustang331's Avatar
    mustang331 is offline Member
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    Need Shinplint INFO!!!

    As some might know I am now slowing my cardio down because I was way too high on my heart rate zone.. So walking it is, I went yesterday ( sat. ) To the gym and kept my heart rate in my zone ( 130 ) But in order to do that I had to walk and when it would go down my heart rate I would put some incline on the treadmill to increase my heartrate, Well today I AM DYING!!! My shins are killing me!! My questions are

    How do I avoid them, what do I do to heal this or fix the pain, and how long untill they heal?

    Am I going to be able to do cardio tomorrow?

    Help!


  2. #2
    Slypknot's Avatar
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    I would say no to cardio tmrw, unless you use a stationary bike. For tonight/tmrw I'd hit em hard with icy-hot, maybe a little ice and lastly a little heat tmrw prior to working out to loosen em up.

    I used to get em all the time till I found that little machine (usually near the calve lift) that is really odd looking and seems to have a pad on the wrong side (where your foot goes inside the little contraption). It's used to work on the muscle on the front of your leg (opposite of calve, and no I don't know the official name) causing you to lift bending at the ankle.

    I started doing these when I work out legs, VERY VERY light weight and just a lot of reps. After a while the shin splints stopped and now I have no probs with em at all.

  3. #3
    BIG TEXAN's Avatar
    BIG TEXAN is offline Respected Member
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    I've found that being in the service that shinsplints were caused by not wearing the right shoe for your style foot. It sounds stupid but I swear to god it works.

  4. #4
    BLASTER40 is offline New Member
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    Someone told me it has to do with the type of shoe you may be
    wearing. go figure.

  5. #5
    brad fuel's Avatar
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    I personally find that power walking uses the tibialis anterior musclemore so than running. This is just based on me speed walking to class across campus compared to my runs. After i speed walk you can feel the fatigue in that muscle.

    I think your muscle will build up eventually, just give it some time. I would rest a day and then go back at it.
    Can you not just do a light jog and keep your HR at 130?

  6. #6
    skiboy is offline Associate Member
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    ok superset calf raises w/ tibalis anterior raises, or walk on your heels, shin splints are blod clots under the skin/near the muscle it is caused by how you foot strikes the ground, this happens to track athletes, when the first wears spikes there feet aren't used to striking and pulling the ground as earlier, yup ice them and you can tape them tight.
    peace dude

  7. #7
    temperoath is offline Junior Member
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    Buy a shoe with the right kind of support for your type of foot.
    ie: if your flat-footed or high arched, choose a shoe accordingly.

    Go to a shoe store where the people know their shit. Not Foot locker or someplace in the mall.

    Also, Ice your shins for 15 minutes after you run.

    You mentioned that your are walking now instead of running. Is this because your not used to it. If so, tough it out, and as your running improves, so will the strength of your tendons, and you'll eventually "Run it out".

    I had shin splints for the first couple of months that I started seriously running. I did these three things, and now I'm fine!

  8. #8
    mustang331's Avatar
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    Originally posted by temperoath
    Buy a shoe with the right kind of support for your type of foot.
    ie: if your flat-footed or high arched, choose a shoe accordingly.

    Go to a shoe store where the people know their shit. Not Foot locker or someplace in the mall.

    Also, Ice your shins for 15 minutes after you run.

    You mentioned that your are walking now instead of running. Is this because your not used to it. If so, tough it out, and as your running improves, so will the strength of your tendons, and you'll eventually "Run it out".

    I had shin splints for the first couple of months that I started seriously running. I did these three things, and now I'm fine!
    I am trying to cut up right now, and if I run or jog my heart rate goes way out of my zone, So I just walk on an incline to keep my heart rate in my zone.

  9. #9
    solidj55 is offline Member
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    This is a cut and past of one my old posts.

    1-get good shoes
    2-extra bodyweight causes this
    3-ice/heat
    4-motrin
    5-when your just sitting around the house/office/whatever hold your leg up in the air and write the ABC's with your toes. I call it ghost writting. You draw the letter of the alphabet with your toes, go A to Z then Z to A without stopping. Do this with both feet every chance your sitting around not doing anything. This will loosen up soreness as well as help strengthen up the muscle and tendon on that part of your leg. It sounds stupid I know but try it. I had a pretty damn good college track sprinter tell me about that and it worked. Part of the problem also may arise from your calves being big and adding that extra strain to the front of you leg.

  10. #10
    Brian1200 is offline Junior Member
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    Solid 55 is right, I got them my senior yr in football, I was running on hard surfaces with cleets, I took advil to help the pain, it helped a little but all it did was mask the pain, I still ran on them and they eventually turned into stress fractures, this was very painfull. Ice them 3x a day for 20 mins, take one Aleve 2x a day, ride a bike if you can for the next two weeks, leave them alone and let them heal, when you get back to running, get a good running shoe, preferably with a air sole, do not run on pavement, run on soft surfaces if you can, like grass or if you live by the ocean run on the beach, hope they get better soon.

  11. #11
    abstrack's Avatar
    abstrack is offline AR-Hall of Famer
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    Ok the bros pretty much summed it up
    1. get good shoes for walking and running i notced soon as i start to get them i throw away my shoes and go get new ones
    2.ice and massage your shins at night
    3.aspirin
    4.magnesium and calcium
    5.plenty of water and streching after wards

    I have the same problems and finally the shit is going away.

  12. #12
    PHATCAT's Avatar
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    I had them real bad when I was younger I dont thik it just lettin them rest ! I played 10 yrs football and 10 years of soccer the only thing that worked for me and I all been a runner Ialso ran track and this is where i learned this the muscle in the front is not strong enough and os being pulled by opposong muscles you know it takes one to contract and the other to extend well towork that other muscle walk back words around the track to start and then move up to a jog when you can do this a couple times a week and in a month No more shinsplints and much stronger muscle inthe front what ever that muscle is (tibialis)!!! This worked for me and I never seen the problem again. I still play soccer and never feel it and kicking the ball really works that muscle!

  13. #13
    itsbiggreg is offline New Member
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    I know a way that you can get rid of your shinsplints for good.First of all the pain you are feeling is a fluid build up in your calf, this in turn pulls the muscle tight at the front of the leg so causing pain.I have curied many of such cases by remedial massage,4-5 treatments and the pain is gone for good.Try this,go to a massure who does this type of massage and you can say good bye to your pain.If all of you who want to get the best from your training get a massage once a week.

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