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  1. #1
    wrstlr69sdnl's Avatar
    wrstlr69sdnl is offline Senior Member
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    Calling All Marines

    As some of you know I am training to leave for marine core boot camp

    I found this website http://usmilitary.about.com/library/.../aa060400b.htm

    and was wondering if this basicly was everything that went on in boot camp

    I am trying to get prepared as I can

    Thanks for the input

    wrstlr69sdnl

  2. #2
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    Bump

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    Warrior's Avatar
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    Basically sounds about right except for a few things that they seemed to have said what "ideal" conditions are... mind you it has been several years since I was there...

    "20 minutes to consume each meal." That's bullshit... I remember countless times somebody not eating correctly or just messin' up in the chow hall only to hear "GET UP - YOUR DONE! Recruit so-and-so just..." When you eat, you eat with your left hand on your knee and shovel it in with the right hand. Your head down looking at your tray - nowhere else. Hearing things like "Gang way - LIVE GRENANDE!" will fill the chow hall when you get up for water or juice and you are walking back to your table with it (one of the humorous things most Drill Instructors do). I remember one guy when I was in Boot Camp got caught looking at a tree while standing in line waiting to get into the chow hall - he spent the majority of his chow time introducing himself to his new friend (that shit was funny!). The last guys into the dining facility (usually the guide and his squad leaders) will have very little chow time.

    "Eight hours of uninterrupted sleep" - ummm - HELLO FIREWATCH! You have to pull an hour or so in the middle of the night making sure everything is good to go. These rotations are usually left to the Squad leaders. Getting the second shit sucks... cause you fall asleep real fast - but then very soon after you are woken back up again... so you really lose about 2 hours of sleep them days. Depending on your Platoon size will depend on if you get firewatch every night or not. And the platoon size will change... we started with around 90 and graduated about 65-69.

    Recruit right to "Attend sick call" - It was unanimous once for me to go to sick call. I was coughing real bad in the middle of the night and waking people up. For fear of a blanket party I listened to my brothers and got on the sick call list one morning. When I got there I didn't have a fever or anyother major symtoms - so I was released from the docs back to the DI's... and they put me through some IT for awhile for showing up to sick call without reason to... so they thought. So after that I just started burrying my head in my pillow at night until the cough subsided.

    "Send mail without fear of censorship." I had a buddy send me a letter in boot camp with shit like, "Aim High Air Force" and "GO Navy" written all over the outside of it... and once again I got put through the IT ringer.

    "Use medication prescribed by a certified military medical officer." AKA - 500mg of Motrin will cure anything...

    But I could go on and on. If you have specific questions I could address those. Just show up with the clothes on your back and only the paperwork your recruiter told you to bring. The Marines will provide you with everything else. And don't be surprised if the clothes you bring don't fit after 13 weeks... everyone leaves at about 170-185 pounds. I went from a 19 year old at 210lbs down to 179lbs at graduation. They don't really care how muscular you are in boot camp - they want everyone the leaving same... lean and mean.

    Good luck - it is an entry way that you get used to after the first month or so. Remember - everything they have you do (or they do to you for that matter) in Boot Camp has a purpose - and the purposes will get more apparent the closer you get to graduation and everything starts to fall in place. And the feeling you get at graduation is priceless... when your Drill Instructors finally refer to you as, "Marine."

    Mail call is also very important - try and get your address out to as many people as possible... BTW - you can get on the Drill Instructors good sides by showing them pics of hot girlfriends (or even sisters) - at least we could. (tell Mom to never send food - not even during the holidays)...
    Last edited by Warrior; 07-05-2003 at 01:57 AM.

  4. #4
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    Roger that Warrior...Couldn't have been more precise than what you said..Just remember, it's only 12 weeks out of your life and you can put up with about anything for 12 weeks..Just don't give up!! Goood Luck!!!

    Doc M

  5. #5
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    My Dad is a retired jar head, and my Brother is active in 1st EOD Platoon... both of them are tuff as nails... very honorable profession... good luck!

  6. #6
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    Warrior hit on the head. I remember in boot camp, one time this guy started laughing at something and th DI's made him stand in front of a mirror and laugh at himself for 30 min. Like warrior said, if pictures are sent try and get some hot looking girls, they will look at all of them regardless. also bump on the getting as much mail as you can. Send everyone your address, u can never get too much mail in boot camp. As far as chow time goes, most of the time, at least for my platoon, our chow was regulated by the guide. When he was done we all were. It don't really matter though, cause you'll learn to shove a whole tray of food down in about 5 mins. Good Luck

  7. #7
    wrstlr69sdnl's Avatar
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    Is there anything that I should learn before so far I heard the general orders and the Marine Core Hymn?

  8. #8
    Warrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrstlr69sdnl
    Is there anything that I should learn before so far I heard the general orders and the Marine Core Hymn?
    It would be very helpful to know the General Orders... and even the Marine Corps Hymn - but trust me, you will know this shit inside and out either way. But to keep from shining light on yourself (especially if you are a slow learner) it would be good to memorize them now - or at least be very familiar with 'em. Your chain of command also, from your clerk at the local DMV to the President - the more you know the better. They will also be adding the military command from your Drill Instructors up to the Commanding General of the Recurit Depot... and on to the Commandant of the Marine Corps.

    Obviously the more prepared you are the better off you will be - but don't think you can use your knowledge as a way to get on the good side of the DI's. Watch and see brother - some recruits will show up with a fresh high and tight hair cut and already marked with Marine Corps tattoos... they'll get picked on for it too - big time. The thing with Boot Camp is to draw as little attention to yourself as possible. Be in shape, know your basic stuff, and just be a normal civilian ready to become a Marine... don't try and show them you think you already are one. Ya dig?

    Tell ya what - I give ya props (not test) for enlisting in the Marines... it shows great heart in your character. It's probably something every one should experience in their life... you grow up a lot in the service. And I knew a lot of guys (and women) who turned their lifes around... and became great leaders. You probably didn't take the bribery from the sister services cause you knew if you were going to do it - you wanted to be part of the best. Just stay motivated and do what your told and it will go by fast. In Boot Camp you will invetiabily feel like shit on the bottom of a shoe at times - but at other times you will be floating on cloud nine as you start to make big accomplishments... especially when completing obstacle/confidence courses, swim qual, drill, PFT, the Crucible and deffinitly graduation. Marine Corps Boot Camp is designed to break you down - and then build you back up... don't let the break down part discourage you too much.

    BTW - here is the Recruit Training Scedule from the MCRD in San Diego.

  9. #9
    Warrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by caturpilar
    I remember in boot camp, one time this guy started laughing at something and th DI's made him stand in front of a mirror and laugh at himself for 30 min.
    I wish I could remember all the funny shit that happend in boot camp - but the one that sticks out the most was once during a hygiene inspection. The DI's came around and did there little "Snap-Pop" routine to check for cleanliness and blisters while we all stood in front of our racks in our whitey-tighties and shower shoes. We had this wirey Marine DI, he was about 5'10", 160 pounds - ripped to the max and every bit the hard ass. He was the one that did most of the IT sessions when ever we messed up one way or the other. So... he is coming around on starboard side checking the recruits when all of a sudden the salt peter must have went in the drain at chow time cause the 4th or 5th recruit down got a huge frickin' hard-on... this thing submerged like a submarine after being underwater for a very long time. The conversation went something like this:
    DI: "What the fuck is that!"
    Recruit: "This recruit does not know, Sir!"
    DI: "Put that away right now recruit!"
    Recruit: "Aye, Sir!"
    DI: "Recruit you have until 10 to..."
    Suddenly the Drill Instructor lowered is smokey brim over his face and walked into his duty hut and slamed the door. We all started quitely laughing - the drill instructor didn't hear us 'cause he was laughing much harder than us in the duty hut. lol

    Another classic was the recruit that had to say "whats up wit dat!?!" everytime a drill instructor called his name because he was caught with his hands in his pocket or something... we would be standing in line somewhere or another and you would hear his name called followed very quickly by a "whats up wit dat!?!"

  10. #10
    Tock's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure I had a much easier time in Air Force Basic Training than you will in Marine Boot Camp. But I'll tell you one thing, you'll likely encounter some of the rudest guys (the drill instructors) you'll ever want to meet. Oh yah. The first 24 to 48 hours or so, they'll terrorize y'all. You'll wish you were anywhere but there. Hell will seem better. There will be yelling, screaming, all sorts of psychological intimidation, loud noises, but (as far as I know) they can't hit you. Legally, anyway. A favorite tactic is to get their nose right up next to yours, squint their eyes, and shout at the top of your lungs. It's all done to inspire terror, acclimate you to abuse, weed out the ones who won't or can't put up with that shit, get you started on the lifetime of mindless obedience that the military (and many corporations) will require of you.
    But hang in there . . . it'll be worth it. When they holler at ya, hassle ya, work you over, it's nothing personal (usually), it's just their job to hassle everybody. If you weren't there, they'd just find somebody else to torment. So, just jump when they tell ya, and don't worry about the hollering. They'll be laughing about it later . . .

    On volunteering . . . I was told when I went in the USAF not to volunteer for anything. Well, that's a bunch of crock. I volunteered for a few things, and ended up training dogs, which has been the most enjoyable thing I've done in the past 30 years (aside from sex and music). You'll have opportunities made available to you, too, along the way. Don't be hesitant to jump on a good thing.

    Lets see, what else . . .
    Oh yeah, if you shuffle your feet when you walk, stop it. Drill instructors hate this. Pick up your damn feet when you move 'em. Also, balance a book on your head and practice walking, they're gonna make you "stand up straight" when they're watching you. Get in the practice of saying "Sir" or "Ma'am" whenever you address someone, 'cause it's suicide to not do this. Whenever you open your mouth, you're gonna have to say, "Sir! Recruit Smith asks permission to speak! Sir!" Yep, expect to have to say "Sir!" at the beginning AND ending of everything you say. Rediculous, but welcome to the US military. At least they won't beat you.

    Chow hall . . . for the first couple of weeks, expect to have to "swallow first and chew later." And whenever you're able to get a drink of water, take one. I fainted a couple times on the Parade grounds in the hot Texas heat 'cause of dehydration. Just keep hydrated and you'll be ok.

    Hair--I spent $15 back in 1975 for a haircut before I went in, and back then a $15 haircut was pretty good. Oh yah, looked just like one of the Bee Gees. Damn good. Thought for sure they'd see how nice it was and let me keep it.
    Ha ha ha ha ha ha !! (still laughing)
    No matter what your hair looks like, once they herd y'all to the barber shop, ain't none of you gonna have any hair left. Gonna stay that way, too. Only way to impress 'em will be to go in with your head already shaved.

    As your drill instructors get acquainted with the guys in your troop (is that what they call 'em in the Marines? It was Flight in the USAF) they're going to figure out who has their shit pretty much together so they can get them to do some of their work for them. Early on, the drill instructors will be herding y'all up from morning to night, later on they'll have squad leaders and a troop leader to do more and more of that for them, eventually get to the point where the drill instructor doesn't have to take you anywhere (and sometimes, he won't, like to church on sunday or to chow, etc.). So, if you think you'd like to be one of the guys who organize the others, keep your ears and eyes open for the chance. There's a downside, though -- if the guys you lead screw up, they're gonna come down on you. But if they do good, and you prove to be a good leader, that'll go on your record, which is good for making rank.

    No matter how much you may be tempted (or justified), never ever shout at a superior officer. They'll throw you in the brig and make you do trivial shit for the rest of your life, and most of the next life as well. So don't do it.

    Oh yah, major deal here -- when the instructor tells you to do something, you better do it. And not half-ass, either. When they tell you to stand at attention, if you scratch your face, you're screwed (something to practice--stand at attention for 10 minutes, maybe 30, at a time without scratching anything). Better not smile, either. Sometimes people smile out of anxiety, it's just one of those things people do. But when the drill instructors see someone smiling, they'll wander over to 'em and invariably scream, "Why are you smiling at me! Do you like me! Huh!" and so forth. Very unnerving.

    You shouldn't take along a lot of stuff with you, 'cause they'll give you everything you need like underwear, shoes, uniforms, etc. But something you really ought to do is take along a cheap camera and film. Make sure you get lots of pictures, 'cause 30 years from now you'll be glad you did.

    One last thing . . . your recruiter hasn't told you, and no one is gonna tell you, but I will. Your ass isn't 100% theirs until they swear you in with the oath of service. Probably won't happen the first day or two, so if you suddenly figure that the military isn't for you (chances are you'll do just fine) you can tell your drill instructor you want out, and you'll be free to go. But after you take that vow, you're all theirs for the 4 or 6 years you signed up for.

    That's about all I can remember right off hand, probably more than what you really need to know. They make boot camp simple enough so anyone with two brain cells to rub together can make it. Just takes a lot of gumption and determination. If you don't have it now, you'll find it along the way.

    Good luck on your new carreer, and have a great time!

  11. #11
    Warrior's Avatar
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    I have to comment on some of Tocks advice... most of it good... but...

    The Drill Instructors will holler and get in your face - but it has to do with learning to except orders and dealing with stress. DI's are there to motivate you to accomplish things you thought you couldn't do and to learn to make good decsions under stressful situations. When they teach you to tie your first D-Ring and the use it to repel down a wall or jump into the hell hole - you'll be surprised at how willing you are to do it... you just jump - putting faith in your leaders (the DIs) and confidence in yourself. Same thing with swim qual, when it's your turn to jump off a high diving board into a pool with full gear on.

    On volunteering... there are a lot of jobs you can volunteer for, like Scribe, Guide, Squad Leader, Whiskey locker, and so on. If you volunteer with such positions be prepared to be in the spot light quite often... but that is also a good way to get recognized. The recruits that graduate as guide or squad leader are recommended for meritourious PFC... and leaving bootcamp with a stripe is a big plus. And being able to say you graduated as guide is something you can always refer back to later on. It just begins a good SRB off the bat. Volunteering puts you in the spotlight - but you can very easily reep the rewards of it too.

    DO NOT go to boot camp with your head already shaved. The Marines want to take a civilian and make them a Marine. And that begins with shaving their head and stripping all your civilian clothes off you. Showing up with a high and tight or a bald head won't get you any browny points in Marine Boot Camp... if anything it will just draw unwanted attention to you.

    A camera? Yeah, right. Thats contraband - at no time would you ever be able to have a camera and film in your foot locker. Everyone is the same - you all get the same shit - the stuff they issue you... the clothes you come in, your wallet, all your shit will be boxed up and you won't see them for 13 weeks. A camera would deffinity be taken from you at receiving.

    Sometimes the Drill Instructors will pick the shit heads for lead positions too. We had a guy that liked to keep fucking up and ditty boping during drill (a total Recruit Pyle)... guess what the Drill Instructors did with him? They made him Guide. They fired what was probably the most squared away guy in our platoon and gave the guidon to the shit bag. This was probably one of the things that I first noticed about Marine Corps leadership... cause it worked. Recruits questioned his authority and all around made his job a difficult one. It took him about three weeks to earn the respect of the platoon and square himself away - at that point he was fired and once again the guidon was passed on...

    Yeah - don't be the smiley recruit Sometimes the Drill Instructors can be downright cruel and it gets rather funny...

    ON A SIDE NOTE: Your first night you will not sleep - you will be up all night. So try your best to get some good sleep prior to checking in. And at "The Moment of Truth" - don't crack... if you smoked a little pot in High School or whatever and didn't tell your recruiter or put in in your service record... keep it to yourself unless you have any arrests or convictions that could prove it. They will try and scare you. IMO - the Marine Corps is a good turning point for a lot of people... just drop the bad habits now.

  12. #12
    wrstlr69sdnl's Avatar
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    thanks for the help Warrior

    I was just wondering what was the gas chamber like and what do you have to do for the to pass the swiming excersize

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    Quote Originally Posted by wrstlr69sdnl
    thanks for the help Warrior

    I was just wondering what was the gas chamber like and what do you have to do for the to pass the swiming excersize
    The gas chamber gets easier in the fleet. In Boot Camp you'll see recruit implants in the side of the wall. In the fleet you can do tricks like not shaving the morning of (the shit burns on a fresh shave). But CS is like little crystals of fiber glass - so unlike tear gas... everyone reacts to it. But you learn to deal with it as you do it more and more after Boot Camp. Basically what will happen (how it happend for me in Boot Camp) is you will line up a long the wall while an NBC Marine will start burning the CS tabs. It will fill the air. Word of advice: try and be in the first group in... cuz after a few rotations - it builds up. The last group will deffinitly have the strongest concentration.

    But they will first have you do excersise to test your seal - be sure your buddy that helps tighten your mask does it right. Cause a loose seal sucks. After your breathing pretty hard they will have you take the mask off and walk around to be sure everyone gets a good breath of it. TRICK: Breath through your teeth... the pores in your enamel will help filter what gets into your lungs... if you try and hold your breath it can back fire because if they take awhile before they call, "GAS, GAS, GAS!" (at that point you put your mask back on and clear it) - you could end gasping for air and taking a huge whiff of it. Just take short breaths through your teeth... it will make it easier on you. Either way they will most likely make sure you breath it so you might as well accept that and do it right. After you clear your mask then you line up to leave. Some will freak out - the key is to remain calm - because if you freak - you take bigger breaths of air. After your outside you'll have snot coming out every orfice in your face... clean yourself off and walk away like the stud you are.

    Swim qual starts off with basic stuff in just PT shorts and moves up in difficulty to a point where you are doing some crazy balancing in the water in full gear and a rubber M16 - or jumping off the high board. Try and get at least second class so you don't have to requal unless you reenlist. Second Class isn't that hard to get with a little determination. Swim qual is like everything else in Boot Camp - remain calm and do what your told and you shouldn't have a problem. Honestly brother, there will be guys who will be scared of swim qual because of some innate fear of water... but they all find the courage in them to at least qualify... but most will have to requal every year in the fleet.

    Swim qual has a lot to do with team work too. You are an asshole if you try and pull your buddy under water to keep your balance while flippin' yourself for a lap in the pool in full gear with helmet (the one where you fill your blouse up with air to use as a floatation device and wade across the pool). That shit gets noticed - don't do it. If you lose your balance - take it like a man and go under and pull yourself off to the side by pulling yourself above water using you pack. The Drill Instructors would be more likely to give you another chance in another relay if you practice a little unselfishness...

  14. #14
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    Warrior, do you realize the flashbacks you're causing me?!?!?!?!!?

    wrstlr69sdnl- Hey bro, I was in the Navy, and from being around different Marines and talking to them about their experiences in Boot, Warrior pretty much summed it all up. All you need to woory about is keeping a positive outlook on the "big" picture, stay focused. What you get out of the MArines all depends on what you put into it. Stay focused, stay positive, and they'll take care of the rest.

    I would have become a Marine (actually my Grandfather gave me shit about joining the Navy up to the day he passed, for he was a Marine) but I wanted to join the Navy to become a SEAL. I achieved my goal, and may you achieve yours.

  15. #15
    wrstlr69sdnl's Avatar
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    well thanks for all the help bros just a couple of training questions my running is fine and my pull ups are fine I can do 22 of them the only thing that sucks in my sit-ups 75 in 2 min. is that good or bad and how can I get them up thanks

    wrstlr69sdnl

  16. #16
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    A camera? Yeah, right. Thats contraband - at no time would you ever be able to have a camera and film in your foot locker.
    ==================

    True, yes, but as soon as boot camp is over, you get all that stuff back. It would be cool to have the camera to get pics of the guys you went through camp with right as everyone was leaving.



    --------------
    ON A SIDE NOTE: Your first night you will not sleep - you will be up all night. So try your best to get some good sleep prior to checking in.
    ----------------

    Better advice was never given. For sure, get lots of sleep before . . . you'll sure need it . . .

  17. #17
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    If you can do 22 pull-ups already with a good run time - you are in good shape. By the time you do your final PFT you'll get those last few sit-ups... and then some. You'll be constantly running and doing various conditioning exercises. You'll be in phenomenol shape. Most people going into Boot Camp can't do 22 pull ups yet - and many suck at running... but they all get there. On that note - practice climbing rope at a neighborhood high school or YMCA - or ask your recruiter if he good show you the ropes - haha - no pun intended. Learning how to lock your feet and getting good at climbing quickly will also put you ahead of the game for a lot of events.

    The funny thing with the Marines that I noticed was it isn't a bunch of football heros and track jocks - it's a pretty rich mixture of backgrounds. Everyone enlists into the Marines for their own reasons. Some to get out of poverty, others to leave gangs (I have seen branding on some Marines) or violent communities (or even countries) and many that just wanted to make a permenent change in their life. For some, it's a family tradition. Don't think you need to be Superman going into the Marines - you just need some basic conditioning and a lot of heart. Once your in - its all about staying in great shape with your unit... and the elite can try out for Recon Training (the less publicized Marine Corps version of the SEALS). But with all the vatiety in people - you all pull together and work with each other - the band of brothers.

    As I was leaving the Corps they were beginning to initiate a plan to make every new Marine a Black Belt by the time they pick up Gunnery Seargent (E-7)... that's the shit. This new hand-to-hand combat training is suppose to be more intense then the LINE training I was taught (basically shit to kill your opponent by shoving his nuts in his face and slaming the heel of your boot into the bridge of his nose... it was to totally cause pain and then finally death). But warfare as it is today is becoming more urban, as opposed to jungle - the enemy is getting closer to you. More specific hand-to-hand skills are required.

    But yeah Tock - that first night they keep them all up in processing. I remember I wasn't even tired because of all the action going on - but once that next night hit... I crashed hard. If anything it gets everyone on the same time schedule (one of those things that seems cruel - but again has a purpose).

    But as far as a camera - thats a great idea... I am sure your family can bring a camera at graduation. You just have to hunt down your buddies as they try and run out the pearly gates after finally hearing from the Drill Instructors, "Dismissed!"
    Last edited by Warrior; 07-08-2003 at 08:56 PM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BIG TEXAN
    Warrior, do you realize the flashbacks you're causing me?!?!?!?!!?
    I am surprised how much I am able to recall Sheeeit... I wish I could have gotten all this intel before I left...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior
    I am surprised how much I am able to recall Sheeeit... I wish I could have gotten all this intel before I left...
    You're not the only one!!!! I've always toyed with the idea of re-enlisting but listening to the stories and remembering quite a few myself I really want to go back in now.

  20. #20
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    Dont worry I bros I really apreciate the help

    Texan you got a PM Some Questions on navy seal training

    Warrior have you ever thought of going Recon?

  21. #21
    Warrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrstlr69sdnl
    Warrior have you ever thought of going Recon?
    I spent about 5 years in the Marine Corps and did a lot of shit and went a lot of places. But I never really dug into the Recon side. A good person to ask about that would be Doc M. Since Big Tex was/is a SEAL - he could probably give some info on it too. But I guess I would say get past Boot Camp first... and then look into putting a package together for special forces... you will need to be at least a first class swimmer with at least a 1st class PFT. Graduating as Guide or a Squad leader from Boot Camp would also help for this.

    I am out now - but I may be heading to the Middle East on a civilian contract very soon... maybe I'll see ya there

  22. #22
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    Just wondering whats the difference between the Guide and Squad Leader

  23. #23
    Warrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrstlr69sdnl
    Just wondering whats the difference between the Guide and Squad Leader
    It's the rule of three. Everyone is in charge of 3 people. The Guide (outside Boot Camp this would be referred to more correctly as the platoon Seargent - and the Guide becomes more of the Platoon's honor man and less of a part of the chain of command) leads 3 Squad Leaders. Each Squad Leader leads 3 Fire Team Leaders... and each Fire Team Leader leads three of it's members.

    I don't recall Fire Team Leaders being enforced in Boot Camp - but if you are Squad Leader... you should take some initative and appoint some. It will show your "natural" leadership potential For example, trying to be a Squad Leader in charge of 12 recruits in a Squad would be a pain (is a pain) - so you apoint 3 Fire Team Leaders and have them answer to you. When some one fucks up in your squad - you hold the fire team leader accountable - who then corrects the actual problem recruit.

    It's kind of hard to explain it all. And becoming a good leader takes time. As well as time learning to be a good follower - but Boot Camp rewards those who show promiss. There are several books on the subject at your local book store that you could read through to understand some of the fundamentals of Marine Corps leadership. You could also ask your recruiter for a BST.

  24. #24
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    Put it this way - when doing something basic like role call for a platoon, the Platoon Sergeant would ask for a report from his Squad Leaders... who previously would have asked for a report from the Fire Team Leaders... who would have previously counted out his Fire Team. This is much more effective than say... if a Platoon Sgt started calling down a list of names for his entire platoon.

    And if someone is missing. The Platoon Sgt holds the Squad Leader accountable - who then holds the Fire Team leader accountable... who then finally provides some kind of corrective action for the inividual in question. The Platoon Sgt would not intervene, in most circumstances, past his Squad Leaders unless it is found completely necessary cause it underminds the Squad Leader's authority. And if it is one of the Squad Leades or Fire Team leaders that is missing - this is very punishable. The higher you go up the chain of command the more accountable you are to the UCMJ.

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    NAvy is the same way, in each Division of 80+ recruits there is
    RPOC- recruit cheif petty officer
    AROC- assistant recruit cheif petty officer
    Starboard Watch Section Leader
    Port Watch Section Leader
    Section Leader
    Division Body

    Also the further you are up the list, the more you are accountable you are as well. I started out in boot as RPOC, than as my RDC (Recruit Division Commander) discovered I was from Texas after 5 weeks, fired me. Than I became part of Division Body, than 2 day later a Section Leader, 1 week later Starboard Watch Section Leader, and for 4 days RPOC again while the current RPOC was recovering from 3 wisdom teeth being pulled. Yeah I bounced around alot, so much for wanting to just be a fly on the wall. Actually me and my RDC became good friends in the fleet after boot. It was his last division to push through and he returned to the fleet as I was heading out and we bumped into each other one day and started hanging out. Talk about totally different guy, he was actually very friendly and not a mean old bastard we all thought him to be.

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    If you're looking into going Special Forces, just concentrate on graduating boot first. But you need to be better than the average soldier, you need to stand out in being physically fit, squared away, no getting into trouble, try and be in the top of your class at all times. The basic tool you need to go SF's is the desire to achieve that goal. It is very physically demanding BUT 80% of it is mental, they will push you until you want to quit, but you have to push past it, accept the pain as just part of the challenge. I wouldn't worry about Recon just yet, but keep it in the back of your mind at all times. Once you get past boot, start talking to anyone to see what all paperwork, classifications, and testing you need to do to get your name on the list. It took me 3 attempts to get my name on the list for BUDDS, so don't give up. There are pre-requisettes you have to meet to be accepted though, so look into it and see what you have to do to qualify. Best of luck to ya.

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    Warrior is hitting all this to a point. In my opinion, volunteering is good to an extent, just don't over do it. Your DI's, will notice your hard work, but they will never let u know it and nobody likes a kiss ass. But thats really what the billets are for, like whiskey locker recruit, knowledge recruit and etc. Keep your knowledge book close, and read it like its the gospel. Guide is the best thing. And if u become guide, you will inevitalbly be fired, it always happens, but if your that good, you'll get it back. I remember this one guy who was guide, and he was good at it , but he pissed of the DI's one day, so they took the guideon from him and told him to run and then they chucked it at him like a javelin. funny shit. He got fired, but ended up graduating as guide. Remember the guideon is the most sacred thing in your platoon. Treat it as so. Your Di's will try and knock it over and throw it down. Some recruits from other platoons will try and steal it too, but be the first to keep it from the ground or being stolen. oh, another sick thing, is u will have to piss in a urinal w/ about 2 other dudes. just be carefull i once pissed all over this guys leg One big thing, to remember, is you will always be wrong, no matter what, the Di's don't want u thinkin that you've got it down. Cause there is always room for improvement. Also, 8 hour of sleep is bullshit too. Not only will u have fire watch, but you will also need to "burn some midnight oil" ironing cammies and polishing boots. Its a bitch getting only 4-6 hr of sleep some nights, but it'll be worth it. Good luck

  28. #28
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    Wrstlr..

    I wish there was something I could add that would help prepare you more for bootcamp, but Warrior has hit about every valid point of advice there is. He should have been a damn recruiter..

    I will touch on the recon questions you had just for some info for you to keep in the back of your mind. Keep in mind it has been several years since I was in so things may have changed a little but for the most part things are the same.

    When I enlisted I literally dropped out of my first semester of college and left two weeks later. Didn't really know what I was getting myself into but I knew I wanted to be a Marine. Didn't even know what Recon was and what all it entailed. I voluntarily enlisted as an 0311(Grunt) to the disdain of my recruiter. I quailified for everything in the Corps but I wanted the excitement and challenge of the infantry. Don't ask me why because I have no logical reason..Too many war movies I guess..

    After boot and School of Infantry I had the opportunity, as does everyone, to go to the Recon Indoctrination. There were roughly 200-250 Marines there of all ranks and by the end of the evolution there were less than 15 still standing. It is very physically grueling but even more of a psychological challenge. After my package was approved and I was released, I went to Battalion Recon and spent a little short of two years there. I traveled the world and saw things I had only seen in the movies. It changed me forever and made me realize how lucky we are to have the luxuries and freedoms that we do. I also had the opportunity to go to some excellent schools. JEST(Jungle School), SCUBA, and basic jump school..I also graduated from ARC or the Amphib Recon Course..It is very much tailored as Navy BUDS is with a few Marine Corps twists. In fact, as a Recon member you have the opportunity to do a lot of tasks and missions with SEAL Platoons..

    After my time with Battalion I was selected to be screened for Force Recon..It is an even smaller size Company that performs a lot of differnet types of missions such as: Direct Action, Hostage Rescue, GOPLAT(Oil Platform Takedowns), Deep Insertion Recon, and a variety of other tasks..This was the best time for me in the Corps..The world was very active when I was in so we saw a lot of engagements and excitement. The requirements for Force were rank of Corporal, infantry experience, and a first class swim classification and first class PFT..Everything you have done from boot to this point is screened and closely scrutinized..These special units are not looking for Rambos, but rather guys that are fit, phsychologically stable, and able to work alone without direct comms with command.

    You can almost always identify the Force Recon Marines by there BDU's..Just as SEALS have the Budweiser, most Force Guys will have a SCUBA Bubble and Gold Jump wings that they wear..See my pic in the AR Lounge under the thread by BigT titled "Prior Service or Active Duty"..

    Now that I have you motivated, remember it is important to tackle one goal at a time..First bootcamp, then start making a plan for your career in the Marines..If you are still interested in the specialized units, remember that you have to be an exceptional Marine to get into these teams..They do not want mediocre but the cream of the crop..Keep your rifle, PFT, swim qual, and marks at the top and you have yourself in a much better position to try out for these units. I will leave you with this thought though. Don't be disillusioned by the movies. Being on these small teams puts you in harms way most of the time even in a training scenario..I lost a close team member and friend on a GOPLAT excercise and it was tough to get past..It was only training..But that's where you seperate yourself from the rest..You push on and put it behind you..I know that my experiences and the discipline I learned during that time helped me push myself in Med School and continues to fuel me to this day..

    If you have any more specific questions, feel free to PM me and I will share what I can recall..

    Warrior, if you read this bro, hit me up on PM and give me a heads up on your possible overseas opportunity..I have the feeling it may be for a prvate defense contractor or something of that nature..I may be able to hook you up with a few friendlies while you are there that are former Marines..I keep in contact with them monthly..They were in my unit so they are shit hot and could show you around..Peace!!

    Doc M
    Last edited by Doc M; 07-10-2003 at 10:26 AM.

  29. #29
    wrstlr69sdnl's Avatar
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    thought I would give this a bump I just found out they changed everything around

    http://www.mcrdsd.usmc.mil/RTR/RTR%20MATRIX.pdf

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    Cool thread!!!! very informative

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