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  1. #1
    Fiskevatten's Avatar
    Fiskevatten is online now Associate Member
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    Need advice as a trainer (PT) for someone heavy

    Hi guys,

    Just got a customer as a PT with a body type I havn't trained before.
    He is 125 kg, 175 cm, 60 years old.

    He has never trained before and the goal is to reach 90 kg.
    I have 2 hours/ day, 5 days a week for a 3 month start.

    I'm a little nervous that going high intensity will hurt him (cardiov, joints, tendons etc).
    Any advice on how I should approach this the best way?
    Start with body strength training and treadmill and then build up slowly?

    Diet is a given, finding a training regeme that is effective and fun without hurting him is what makes me not so sure.

  2. #2
    PeanutbutterDC's Avatar
    PeanutbutterDC is offline Female Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiskevatten View Post
    Hi guys,

    Just got a customer as a PT with a body type I havn't trained before.
    He is 125 kg, 175 cm, 60 years old.

    He has never trained before and the goal is to reach 90 kg.
    I have 2 hours/ day, 5 days a week for a 3 month start.

    I'm a little nervous that going high intensity will hurt him (cardiov, joints, tendons etc).
    Any advice on how I should approach this the best way?
    Start with body strength training and treadmill and then build up slowly?

    Diet is a given, finding a training regeme that is effective and fun without hurting him is what makes me not so sure.
    I'd suggest mixing up cardio quite a bit so he doesn't suffer overuse injury or boredom. Elliptical is gentle. Stationary bike (tho I hate those things!) Get him walking outdoors if possible. Get him on a shallow step maybe.

    Personally not a huge fan of starting overweight, elderly people with body weight exercises. I'd start with machines, then possibly cables, dumbbells, and so on.

    Priority should be given to keeping the movements simple at first and mastering form. Focus on slow reps, and long sets with low weights. Remember the principal of time under tension. Also keep in mind: the heavier the weight, the more likely injury. Likelihood of injury also rises with how complicated the movement. Your client can make great strength and hypertrophy gains with low and slow simple movements.
    Hth!

  3. #3
    Fiskevatten's Avatar
    Fiskevatten is online now Associate Member
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    I feel the same way, there is a lot of risks involved in elderly overweight and I don't think he have the mind for it either.
    However, gotta try help the fellow.

    BIG thank you for your advice! I will meet him this weekend to discuss, his girlfriend is the one who set him up for this and will pay.
    Her words was -"Be realy strict and push him", but I highly feel that it will be the wrong approach here if she want him out of the sick bed^^

    Will use your advice and put in some bodyweight movements, rubber band and swimming as well.

  4. #4
    Eduke93's Avatar
    Eduke93 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiskevatten View Post
    Hi guys,

    Just got a customer as a PT with a body type I havn't trained before.
    He is 125 kg, 175 cm, 60 years old.

    He has never trained before and the goal is to reach 90 kg.
    I have 2 hours/ day, 5 days a week for a 3 month start.

    I'm a little nervous that going high intensity will hurt him (cardiov, joints, tendons etc).
    Any advice on how I should approach this the best way?
    Start with body strength training and treadmill and then build up slowly?

    Diet is a given, finding a training regeme that is effective and fun without hurting him is what makes me not so sure.
    Keep it functional and low impact. Id steer away from cardio from a business perspective, if your sat next to him for an hour on the cross trainer he isn’t getting his money’s worth.

    I think a 15 minute warm up, get the blood flowing then move into various functional based circuits using medicine balls, body weight, Kettle bells, TRX etc…

    Ease him in, learn his body and test his limits… You can only understand his body through trial and error so designing a program that’s works for him will take time. Nutrition will be key as always for his weight loss, so focus lots of time into this and make sure he follows it.

    Don’t over complicate it.

  5. #5
    Fiskevatten's Avatar
    Fiskevatten is online now Associate Member
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    Thank you!
    Never tried TRX myself, will look into it. We got a boxing area as well, might be fun to let him blow of some steam as cardio once in a while.

    I feel great about this challenge! Thanks to you guys I feel a lot more relaxed as well.
    I'm used to going way and beyond, so it's a little weird going slower for me, but there is joy in helping and growing!

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