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  1. #1
    Warrior21 is offline Associate Member
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    Okay, I found the problem.

    Hey all, I'm probably infamous on this board now unfortunately. I'd just like to follow up on all the studies I was doing in regards to my lack of results while taking anabolic steroids or T3. In part I'm doing this to clear my name, in part I'm also doing this to help any of those who also face the same problem.
    I happen to be mercury poisoned. This is the result of mercury amalgam fillings, and massive tuna intake for years. I used to average 2-4 cans of tuna a day, every day. I ate Albacore tuna, turns out it is highest in mercury content.
    So how exactly does mercury poisoning cause me to not respond to steroids or t3? Mercury binds to all kinds of receptors, including the thyroid androgen nuclear receptor superfamily. This also goes for my body's natural thyroid and testosterone as well. I'm currently hypothyroid, yet my bloodwork does not reveal any problems. Thyroid medication does not help, because of the mercury.
    You can compare the effects on androgen receptors of mercury to Nolvadex 's action on estrogen receptors (in breast tissue anyways). Basically mercury is sitting in the receptor, not allowing steroids or t3 to attach and activate gene transcription.
    ANother effect of mercury poisoning is that it alters cellular membrane permeability. Unfortunately this means that nutrients cannot enter the cells as they should, and I am left with nutritional deficiencies.
    What do I do now? Step 1, remove mercury amalgam fillings. Step 2, chelate any mercury/heavy metals /w DMSA. Step 3, intake extra doses of vitamins and minerals to rapidly restore healthy cellular function. Step 4, get on a nice clean cycle, and make a great cycle log for you guys which will show my true capabilities.

  2. #2
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    2-4 cans of tuna is a little much but its not gonna give u mercury poisoning dude. when im dieting i eat 2 or 3 cans a day. sorry bud sounds like an excuse to me, get real.

  3. #3
    AandF6969's Avatar
    AandF6969 is offline Made Up Of Wires
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    Albacore tuna is pretty serious... has a LOT more mercury than regular.

  4. #4
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    my baaaad i didn't read albacore. still tho...

  5. #5
    Warrior21 is offline Associate Member
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    Bro, quit that. Did you not read about my mercury amalgams?
    Here, check this video;http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ylnQ-T7oiA

  6. #6
    Amorphic's Avatar
    Amorphic is offline Veritas, Aequitas ~
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    interesting.

  7. #7
    Warrior21 is offline Associate Member
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    Heh, it's been extremely frustrating for me though. I just figured I'd let you guys in on years of a sliver of my research.
    Heavy metal toxification is a serious issue.

  8. #8
    AandF6969's Avatar
    AandF6969 is offline Made Up Of Wires
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    Have you spoken to a doctor about getting detoxed?

    I had a hair test done about a year ago... I usually eat about 2 cans of regular tuna a day. I don't remember the units, but my mercury level was about twice the level of a normal person... but it didn't really start to affect you until about 5x as much.

  9. #9
    Warrior21 is offline Associate Member
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    Yea I'll be doing DMSA to get it detoxed.

  10. #10
    Charly is offline New Member
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    Hi Warrior21,

    it is now 6 months after you think you found your problem.

    do you now have the same results from AAS, like most others ?

    In my opinion, this is not the problem, because most bodybuilders

    have almagam too and many eat a lot of tuna fish.

    If this would be a problem, 95 % of all bodybuilders would be non-responders too ...

  11. #11
    Overhaulz's Avatar
    Overhaulz is offline Associate Member
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    Warrior21 hasn't made a post since 11-21-07 (which is probably why this post was dead for 6 months). I doubt you're going to get an answer, but who knows?

  12. #12
    Kale is offline ~ Vet~ I like Thai Girls
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    He died of Tuna Poisoning

  13. #13
    Warrior21 is offline Associate Member
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    F*ck excuses, the mercury was part of the problem, but not fully. The root of the problem is a severe zinc deficiency indicated by blood work and the zinc status test.

    Steroids work by activating gene transcription once they bind to androgen receptors. It just so happens that androgen receptors (and all nuclear receptors for that matter) are composed of "zinc-fingers".
    Zinc fingers are a zinc atom surrounded by 4 cysteine residues. They are transcription factors, meaning they are the ones who start the whole transcription process (the "orders" for your body to build muscle etc, etc). Without adequate zinc levels in the body, what happens when you take steroids is that they bind to the receptors, but the receptor is more or less inactive.
    Think of it this way. Let's say I have a cable sattelite at my house, and I have several receivers connected to the televisions in my house, but I'm missing a chip on each of those receivers. What happens then? Well the sattelite send the signal (the hormone) to the receievers (androgen receptors), but the end result we desire (watching the cable on your televesion) does not happen.
    So flame me if you want, I can post studies. Either way I've been flamed quite a few times here. Oh and I'm kinda surprised a certain "guru" on here never came across this information. He'd rather bash me than actually keep an open mind and pull up google or pubmed every now and then.

  14. #14
    Warrior21 is offline Associate Member
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    For the hell of it;
    "How Essential is Zinc?

    Calling zinc a “trace” element is perhaps a misnomer left over from the days it was hard to detect. It is certainly present in more than a trace in all tissues. In the late forties McCance and Widdowson showed that the adult human body contains about two grams of zinc. Sixty percent of body zinc is in muscle, 20% in bone, 5% in blood and liver and 3% in skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Scoular and Macy did balance studies in preschool children in the early forties showing that five milligrams were retained out of an intake of 16 mg a day. Such a retention, five times greater than iron for example, seemed to speak against the classification of zinc as a “trace” element. With the development of atomic absorption spectrophotometry in the late fifties, investigation of the importance of zinc in human nutrition was made much easier.

    Zinc is the most abundant trace metal inside most cells. The exception is red blood cells where iron has its special oxygen-carrying function. Even the macro element calcium is less abundant than zinc in all other cells except bone cells. Zinc is not limited, as are calcium and iron, to a few functional roles. Zinc is a functionally essential component of more than 200 enzymes, pervading all metabolic pathways. The role of zinc in such enzymes can be either structural and/or catalytical. Zinc also helps to stabilize membrane structures. It protects their integrity by the reduction of free radical formation, thus preventing lipid peroxidation.

    The paramount importance of zinc to an organism is in multiplicative cell growth. Zinc has a fundamental role in gene replication, activation and repression, is critical for transcription and translation, and affects nucleic acid metabolism. Growth of young rats on a zinc deficient diet stops within twenty-four hours, probably due to the lack of gene regulatory proteins. These contain a common structure - the “zinc finger”, which are loops of chains of amino acids, held together at the base by a zinc atom. Gene regulatory proteins may contain eleven such “fingers,” which reach down into the grooves of the DNA helix and promote transcription. Zinc also mediates the activity of growth hormone. When growth hormone attaches to its specific receptor sites on a cell membrane, it needs a zinc atom to make the connection. The resulting complex has been called a “zinc sandwich.”Symptoms of severe deficiency in rats include loss of hair and gross skin lesions. In older rats there are testicular atrophy and failure of spermatogenesis, congenital malformations and difficult births with excessive bleeding in pregnant females. These symptoms have been found in humans with acrodermatitis entropathica, a genetic defect in zinc absorption mechanisms. Before it was discovered that zinc supplements resolved the problem, children with the defect died of lung and intestinal infections before they reached two years of age.

    We can conclude that zinc is not only essential, but because it is involved in so many important process may even be “first” limiting. This means it is the critical limiting factor in the diet. Zinc is especially needed in times of rapid growth. This is due not only to effects on gene replication and nucleic acid metabolism but also as a mediator of growth hormone action. The consequences of zinc deficiency are likely therefore to be extensive, if not catastrophic for the organism."http://www.unsystem.org/scn/archives/scnnews09/ch5.htm

  15. #15
    mauler's Avatar
    mauler is offline Associate Member
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    honestly why would this guy make this up? i mean he has been to a doctor right?
    i believe you warrior.

  16. #16
    Warrior21 is offline Associate Member
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    Props to you bro, check out the research I just posted up like 2 seconds ago. I dunno if you seen some of my threads like 2 years ago or something but it just goes to show the reason I've been gone for a while.

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