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  1. #1
    imyoked is offline New Member
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    what would make me recover faster?

    will test d bol and test deca make me recover from a knee opperation faster? i need to be back from acl replacment in about 3 1/2 to 4 months will these help?

  2. #2
    RoNNy THe BuLL's Avatar
    RoNNy THe BuLL is offline Anabolic Member
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    You might want to check with your doc about taking AS right after surgery, may complicate things a bit more than you expect. The AS will only help muscle buildup and repair, not ligament damage. If anything, taking any AS will only be harmful for your recovery IMO...

    Just stick to what the docs say because none of us (or atleast 99.99999% of us) aren't Doc's and in the end, they know best.

    Supplements wise? I would recommend Glutamine and some ZMA. Maybe even popping a few multi-vitamins just for the sake of it.

    How loud was you ACL pop anyways when it happened?

  3. #3
    imyoked is offline New Member
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    well i will just be getting off a cycle of anapolon and deca and i really dont want to lose all the gains iv got form that cycle.

  4. #4
    RoNNy THe BuLL's Avatar
    RoNNy THe BuLL is offline Anabolic Member
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    You may have to cut your losses bro and pray for the better. You want to maintain the overall health of your body for the future bro, as hard as it is to accept, you're going to have to put your injury before anything else and take some time off to let that bastard heal. I know how it can be, but in the long run, you won't be limping to kick yourself in the ass, you'll be able to do it with a fully recovered ACL.

    Injuries always get the best of us as they become the new prime focus of recovery, putting aside weightlifting, it's a sad reality for many of us.

    I feel for you bro....

  5. #5
    RoNNy THe BuLL's Avatar
    RoNNy THe BuLL is offline Anabolic Member
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    Protecting the ACL.
    Author/s: Carrie Myers Smith
    Issue: Jan, 2001

    A carefully designed program can help clients avoid painful ACL injuries.

    Looking for a new twist to acid to your sport-specific training? How about a workout targeted at preventing a common ailment--anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury? There are about 80,000 ACL injuries each year in the United States, with the majority occurring in active people 15 to 45 years old (Daniel & Fritschy 1994). Since more males participate in sports, men have a higher ACL injury rate than women. However, statistics from the National Collegiate Athletic Association show that when men and women participate in activities with similar rules and equipment, the likelihood of sustaining an ACL injury is two to eight times greater for women (Arendt & Dick 1995). Chances are, a number of your clients are at risk.

    What price do the injured pay? For starters, just under $1 billion is spent each year on ACL reconstructive surgery (Frank & Jackson 1997), and this figure doesn't include the cost of initial acute care, rehabilitation, treatment for long-term complications or lost work time--not to mention the emotional cost for sidelined exercisers.

    The Anatomy

    Lying deep in the knee, the ACL connects the tibia to the femur. The ligament extends posteriorly and laterally from the area anterior to the intercondylar eminence of the tibia to the posterior medial surface of the lateral condyle of the femur.

    Approximately 70 percent of ACL injuries result from noncontact mechanisms. Stretched or torn in most knee injuries, the ACL is especially vulnerable to such athletic movements as landing, stopping, or planting the feet to change direction (Kirkendall & Garrett 2000).

    Possible Risk Factors

    In investigating the probable causes of ACL injury, researchers have focused attention on the higher injury rate among females. The two most popular theories for this phenomenon cite anatomical and hormonal differences between men and women.

    Anatomical Differences. The average woman, when compared to a man of the same age, has a wider pelvis, as well as a greater tendency to femoral varus, tibial valgus and foot pronation. (See "Glossary" on page 21 for definitions of select terms.) In addition, women tend to have more femoral anteversion and an increased Q-angle. According to Rozzi and colleagues (1999), joint laxity is also more prevalent among women, and other researchers have shown that women tend to have smaller femoral notch widths (Shelbourne, Davis & Klootwyk 1998; Souryal & Freeman 1993). It's possible that these anatomical characteristics could make the ACL more susceptible to injury.

    Hormonal Differences. Female hormones may also play a role. Liu and colleagues (1996) found estrogen and progesterone receptor sites in human ACL cells, raising the question of a possible connection between these hormones and a predisposition to injury. Some researchers have attempted to link the phase of a woman's menstrual cycle to injury rate. One study found there were more injuries in the ovulatory phase and significantly fewer in the follicular phase (Wojtys et al. 1998).

    The main problems with both the anatomical and hormonal theories for ACL injury are lack of substantial research and conflicting results among those studies that are available (Griffin et al. 2000).

    The Role of Movement Patterns

    Another area being considered in the study of ACL injuries is biomechanics--in particular, the role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in joint stability. The theory that these factors play an important part seems to be supported by the difference in injury rates between the sexes. According to a study by Griffin and other researchers (2000), "Gender differences have been found in motion patterns, positions and forces generated from the hip and trunk to the knee." Bert Mandelbaum, MD, principal investigator for a Santa Monica ACL injury prevention project called PEP (Prevent injury and Enhance Performance), explains that when running or landing from a jump, women tend to be in a more upright, extended, flat-footed position than men, placing more pressure on the quadriceps. Activating the quadriceps while the knee is in nearly full extension puts measurable strain on the ACL. Thus one important strategy for preventing injury may be teaching athletes to lower their center of gravity during cutting and landing maneuvers (Kirkendall & Garrett 2000).

    Prevention Strategies

    Given the research to date, it is likely that hormones, anatomy and biomechanics all play some part in ACL injury. The question is, what can be done to decrease injury risk? Based on several studies that have demonstrated that adding neuromuscular and proprioceptive exercises to a training regimen can significantly reduce the number of ACL injuries (Caraffa et al. 1996; Hewett et al. 1996; Hewett et al. 1999), members of the PEP Project have proposed the following strategies:

    * Avoid vulnerable positions by teaching correct movement technique.

    * Improve flexibility.

    * Increase strength.

    * Incorporate plyometric exercises into the training program.

    * Increase proprioception through agility exercise.

    The PEP Program

    Although originally intended for soccer players, the PEP program (outlined on page 23) makes a great 30-minute workout for anyone interested in preventing ACL injury. By implementing this program and adding extra cardio work and upper-body strengthening to complete the training regimen, you may be able to help your athletic clients stay off the sidelines and in the game!

    Carrie Myers Smith has a degree in exercise physiology and is currently working on her master's degree in nutrition through Clayton College in Birmingham, Alabama.

  6. #6
    RoNNy THe BuLL's Avatar
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    Strategies to Reduce Noncontact ACL Injuries.(Brief Article)
    Issue: Oct, 2000

    An estimated 80,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears occur annually in the U.S., with the majority of these knee injuries sustained by 15- to 25-year-olds. The cost of repairing these injuries is almost $1,000,000,000 each year. With 70% of ACL injuries happening in noncontact situations, the ability to identify risk factors and form prevention strategies has widespread health and fiscal importance.

    Noncontact ACL injuries occur due to environmental factors such as equipment and shoe surface interaction; anatomic factors, including knee and hip angle; hormonal factors; and biomechanical factors such as muscular strength, skill level, and body movement. While the basic mechanism that causes contact ACL injuries is well-researched, the mechanism that causes noncontact ACL injuries is still unknown. The activities most associated with significant risk levels for noncontact ACL injuries usually have extensive pivoting, decelerating, awkward landings, and rough or "out of control" play.

    "Although we don't know the exact risk factors for noncontact ACL injuries, we do know that prevention programs that emphasize balance and motor skills show promise as a way to decrease noncontact ACL injuries," notes Atlanta orthopedic surgeon Letha Y. Griffin. "It appears that, if people learn to stay balanced in their lower extremities, they can reduce their risk of noncontact ACL injuries."

    Another area of concern to researchers is the growing gender difference in ACL injuries. Though a greater absolute number of males participate in sports activities, female athletes are more susceptible to ACL injuries, both contact and noncontact, than their male counterparts. Women tend to land with straighter legs and more pressure on their quadriceps, resulting in more pressure on their knees per pound of bodyweight, explains Edward Wojtys, an orthopedic surgeon from Ann Arbor, Mich. "As we develop prevention programs to reduce the number of noncontact ACL injuries, we need to keep in mind that the way women jump and land contributes to a very high rate of serious knee injuries. By adapting the physical training programs, we can reduce that rate and keep more females in the game longer."

    COPYRIGHT 2000 Society for the Advancement of Education

    COPYRIGHT 2000 Gale Group

  7. #7
    RoNNy THe BuLL's Avatar
    RoNNy THe BuLL is offline Anabolic Member
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    Hope those articles give you some insight on how to prevent and recover your ACL. I tore both my meninsci in high school, shitty fucking deal, I know how you feel brah.

  8. #8
    Warrior's Avatar
    Warrior is offline AR-Hall of Famer
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    So you just turned 17 in June eh? AHHHHHHH - would the kids get off juice already!!!!!

    This is getting so rediculous!

    Just fucking lift heavy with proper intensity and learn - that's all you need right now junior.

  9. #9
    TrenFreak3's Avatar
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    nice post ronny, great info....hopfuly people with torn ACL and MCLs will learn.....cheers

  10. #10
    Douceberg is offline New Member
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    I suffered from a similar injury. One thing you need to face is that your knee will never be the same. Any AS will help with muscular development and will help with your recovery but will do nothing to help the ligament. Also, what did the doctor use for the graft??(patella tendon, cadaver, hamstring...etc). If you want to cheat the natural recovery of your injury, HGH will be the best option. Most professional athletes use growth to recover from major injuries. It works miracles for them. Most recently, a nameless NFL MVP RB from the St. louis Rams suffered a very severe knee injury and was told that he would be out for the season. He purchased growth from my friend and his recovery was speedy. What would have taken months maybe even a year, took weeks to recover from. My suggestion would be to take whatever you can get your hands on. No matter what you take, know that you still have to work hard to recover from this type of injury. If you don't work hard, you will not recover no matter what supplements or gear you are taking.

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