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  1. #1
    Big Balta's Avatar
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    Natural lifter/bodybuilder, when should I stop eating before bed?

    I've made a nasty habit of eating late at night right before bed and over the years I got some fat accumulation on my belly. I'm at about 14-15% bf and I can't see my abs clearly. I have a line down the middle of my stomach and you can see a bulge from the top two abs, but around the belly button, no sir.

    I'm 215 lbs btw. So how long before bed should I stop eating and what would be a good "before bed" meal?

  2. #2
    jypoll's Avatar
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    i eat when my last meal (protein shake, egg whites, cottage cheese, peanut butter: hi protein moderate fat, low carb) when i know i have about 5-10mins before i pass out, if i waited any longer before sleeping i may forgot or be too lazy to eat it

  3. #3
    jpowell is offline Banned
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    protein and fats or just pro is what i was always told. avoid all carbs in the last 2 meals. my bed time meal is 2 cans a tuna (10 oz) and 2 tablespoons a pb.

  4. #4
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    Ok so low carbs/ high protein before bed. I can live with that. Thanks guys.

  5. #5
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    cottage cheese 1% milkfat mixed with peanut butter is the ultimate bedtime snack, it almost feels like cheating very yummy and filling. and its low carb/high protein

  6. #6
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    I do zero carb, high pro and medium fat for my last meal before bed. Zero carb certainly keeps the fat at bay.

    This is what I ate last night 2 hrs before bed:

    12 oz. lean beef fillet
    Large bowl of salad with mixed greens and vegetables, 3 tbs of EVOO

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Balta View Post
    I've made a nasty habit of eating late at night right before bed and over the years I got some fat accumulation on my belly. I'm at about 14-15% bf and I can't see my abs clearly. I have a line down the middle of my stomach and you can see a bulge from the top two abs, but around the belly button, no sir.

    I'm 215 lbs btw. So how long before bed should I stop eating and what would be a good "before bed" meal?
    What time do you train?

    How long before bed......


    Carbs before bed do not make you fat
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  8. #8
    leather daddy is offline Banned
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    lol
    so much bro science in this thread its not even funny. Uve accumalated fat because uve taken in to many calories, to many calories =fat. Eating carbs 1 min before you go to bed doesnt have any effect on you. Your body works on a much bigger net basis. 24-48-72 weekly net basis.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by leather daddy View Post
    lol
    so much bro science in this thread its not even funny. Uve accumalated fat because uve taken in to many calories, to many calories =fat. Eating carbs 1 min before you go to bed doesnt have any effect on you. Your body works on a much bigger net basis. 24-48-72 weekly net basis.
    Thankyou

    And if you keep posting like this I will see you to a 'Productive/knowlegable member' soon


    Come on guys, lets stop parroting bBo-Science, please ignore anything that is written in a BBing magazine
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  10. #10
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    If one has hit his daily carb requirements during the day, eating carbs further throughout the night will promote fat retention. This is a very common mistake people do with their diet, they fuel their bodies with carbs non-stop, ignoring that they might have hit their daily carb requirement already.

    I consume all my carbs during the day, because that's when I need the energy that comes from carbs, hence I go zero carb at night, which is a regimen I have been following over the past years and getting satisfactory results.

    Not that I am offended by statements such as ''parroting bro-science'' and inquiring information regarding nutrition from BBing magazines, I felt the need to explain myself since I have also contributed to this post by replying to OP.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turkish Juicer View Post
    If one has hit his daily carb requirements during the day, eating carbs further throughout the night will promote fat retention. This is a very common mistake people do with their diet, they fuel their bodies with carbs non-stop, ignoring that they might have hit their daily carb requirement already.

    I consume all my carbs during the day, because that's when I need the energy that comes from carbs, hence I go zero carb at night, which is a regimen I have been following over the past years and getting satisfactory results.

    Not that I am offended by statements such as ''parroting bro-science'' and inquiring information regarding nutrition from BBing magazines, I felt the need to explain myself since I have also contributed to this post by replying to OP.
    i agree, i have been limiting carbs strictly to brekkie, pre/post wo. any other meals are 10g or less of carbs and im the fittest, leanest, and strongest(by bodyweight) i have ever been in my life

  12. #12
    jpowell is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by jypoll

    i agree, i have been limiting carbs strictly to brekkie, pre/post wo. any other meals are 10g or less of carbs and im the fittest, leanest, and strongest(by bodyweight) i have ever been in my life
    i have to 3rd this. in my defense, having no carbs at night i wake up leaner. and feel better about myself. plus with my curret diet setup, high prot mod fats, low carbs (only from vegetables) ive seen results that are worth mentioning. bro science or not.

    if it works and yields results its worthy a mention n my book.

  13. #13
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    Carbs at any time CAN make you gain bodyfat..... What is so different about eating carbs at night? Personally I believe in keeping carbs around training no matter what time that is


    Body composition, nutrient intake and physical activity patterns in young women during Ramadan.

    Al-Hourani HM, Atoum MF.

    Source

    Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, The Hashemite University, PO Box 150459, Zarqa 13115, Jordan. hhourani@hu.edu.jo

    Abstract
    INTRODUCTION:
    Muslims abstain from food and fluid between the hours of sunrise to sunset, and usually eat a large meal after sunset and a lighter meal before sunrise. The purpose of this study was to assess body composition, nutrient intake and physical activity patterns during Ramadan fasting.
    METHODS:
    This study was carried out during Ramadan in October 2004. A total of 57 female subjects were recruited from The Hashemite University in Jordan. Body weight, fat percentage, muscle mass, and percentage body water content were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Estimated food records over a duration of three days were used to assess the intake of energy, carbohydrates, protein, fat, and sugars before and during Ramadan fasting. Physical activity patterns were determined from a three-day activity diary before and during Ramadan fasting; the amount of physical activity was expressed as the physical activity level.
    RESULTS:
    Body weight and BMI decreased significantly during Ramadan fasting. The mean energy and nutrients intake before Ramadan (energy; percent carbohydratesrotein:fat was 1,252; 56:12:33) and during Ramadan (1,171; 56:13:34) were not significantly different. The mean physical activity level was 1.54 before Ramadan and 1.51 during Ramadan, and this was also not significantly different.
    CONCLUSION:
    This study revealed that there was a significant weight loss during Ramadan. Estimates of energy, carbohydrates, protein, fat and sugar did not change, despite the reduction in the number of meals taken. The overall activity patterns remained similar


    **Granted this study does not state what the BF% was after, however it does state that there was a significant loss in weight....






    Chronobiological aspects of weight loss in obesity: effects of different meal timing regimens.

    Sensi S, Capani F.

    Source
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Chieti, Italy.

    Abstract
    A series of short- and long-lasting experimental protocols of different meal timing regimes were performed in obese subjects to assess the possible occurrence of (1) a different metabolic fate of nutrients; (2) a phase shift of circadian rhythms of metabolic and hormonal parameters strictly related to nutrition; (3) a different weight loss. (A) In a short-lasting protocol (3 days) 15 obese subjects were fed a hypocaloric diet (684 kcal/day) (a) at 10 hr only, (b) at 1800 hr only; (c) at 1000 hr, 1400 hr and 1800 hr, or (d) studied during a 36-hr fasting. Measures of calorimetry (R.Q., CHO and lipid oxidations, energy expenditure), hormones (plasma cortisol, insulin , HGH, urinary catecholamines), urinary electrolytes (Na, K) and vital parameters (body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure) were carried out at 4-hr intervals for three days. A significantly higher lipid oxidation and a lower CHO oxidation were documented with the meal at 1800 hr, in comparison with the meal at 1000 hr. CHO and lipid oxidation circadian rhythms appeared the most affected by meal timing. (B) In a long-lasting protocol (18 days) 10 obese subjects were fed the same hypocaloric diet (a) at 1000 hr only and (b) at 1800 hr only. Calorimetric measures were performed every other day for 2 hr preceding each meal. Before and after the 18-days single meal period, body temperature, plasma cortisol, PRL and TSH were recorded (delta t = 4 hr). A higher lipid oxidation and a lower CHO oxidation were again demonstrated with the meal at 18 hr. Minimal changes of hormonal circadian rhythms were documented suggesting that the hypothalamus-hypophysis network is scarcely affected by meal timing. Weight loss did not vary in both short- and long-term protocol.






    Extract from an article on Science daily

    scientists studied 16 female rhesus monkeys that were placed on a high-fat diet similar in composition to the diet normally consumed by humans in the United States and other Western countries. During the study, all of the monkeys had their ovaries removed - this simulates a menopause-like state in female monkeys similar to human female menopause. In lower animals both high fat diet and decreased ovarian function lead to weight gain. The contribution of menopause to weight gain in middle-aged women has not been well established, perhaps because many other life style changes generally occur during this period of life, such as changes in eating habits and exercise habits as children grow up and leave home. In this study monkeys did gain about 5% more weight after their ovaries were removed providing clear evidence that ovarian hormones contribute to weight balance in primates, as well as in lower animals. These results were presented at the 2003 Society for Neuroscience Meeting.
    The researchers then observed the monkeys for one year. In addition to studying their weight gain, researchers noted how much and when the animals ate, which varied dramatically among the animals observed. Specifically, the researchers found that the monkeys ate between 6 percent and 64 percent of their total calories at night. This is comparable to reports in humans who take in approximately 24 percent to 65 percent of total calories at night.
    "It was really interesting to see that the monkeys who ate most of their food at night were no more likely to gain weight than monkeys who rarely ate at night," said Elinor Sullivan, an OHSU graduate student conducting research along with Cameron at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. "This suggests that calories cause weight gain no matter when you eat them."





    Weight loss is greater with consumption of large morning meals and fat-free mass is preserved with large evening meals in women on a controlled weight reduction regimen.

    Keim NL, Van Loan MD, Horn WF, Barbieri TF, Mayclin PL.

    Source
    U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Presidio of San Francisco, CA 94129, USA.

    Abstract
    The purpose of this study was to determine whether meal ingestion pattern [large morning meals (AM) vs. large evening meals (PM)] affects changes in body weight, body composition or energy utilization during weight loss. Ten women completed a metabolic ward study of 3-wk weight stabilization followed by 12 wk of weight loss with a moderately energy restricted diet [mean energy intake +/- SD = 107 +/- 6 kJ/(kg.d)] and regular exercise. The weight loss phase was divided into two 6-wk periods. During period 1, 70% of daily energy intake was taken as two meals in the AM (n = 4) or in the PM (n = 6). Subjects crossed over to the alternate meal time in period 2. Both weight loss and fat-free mass loss were greater with the AM than the PM meal pattern: 3.90 +/- 0.19 vs. 3.27 +/- 0.26 kg/6 wk, P < 0.05, and 1.28 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.16 kg/6 wk, P < 0.001, respectively. Change in fat mass and loss of body energy were affected by order of meal pattern ingestion. The PM pattern resulted in greater loss of fat mass in period 1 (P < 0.01) but not in period 2. Likewise, resting mid-afternoon fat oxidation rate was higher with the PM pattern in period 1 (P < 0.05) but not in period 2, corresponding with the fat mass changes. To conclude, ingestion of larger AM meals resulted in slightly greater weight loss, but ingestion of larger PM meals resulted in better maintenance of fat-free mass. Thus, incorporation of larger PM meals in a weight loss regimen may be important in minimizing the loss of fat-free mass.




    Martin Berkhan Quote.... '' in controlled studies, late eating patterns are superior for fat loss and body composition.''




    Greater weight loss and hormonal changes after 6 months diet with carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner.

    Sofer S, Eliraz A, Kaplan S, Voet H, Fink G, Kima T, Madar Z.

    Source
    The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Institute of Biochemistry and Food Science, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.

    Abstract
    This study was designed to investigate the effect of a low-calorie diet with carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner on anthropometric, hunger/satiety, biochemical, and inflammatory parameters. Hormonal secretions were also evaluated. Seventy-eight police officers (BMI >30) were randomly assigned to experimental (carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner) or control weight loss diets for 6 months. On day 0, 7, 90, and 180 blood samples and hunger scores were collected every 4 h from 0800 to 2000 hours. Anthropometric measurements were collected throughout the study. Greater weight loss, abdominal circumference, and body fat mass reductions were observed in the experimental diet in comparison to controls. Hunger scores were lower and greater improvements in fasting glucose, average daily insulin concentrations, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)), T-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were observed in comparison to controls. The experimental diet modified daily leptin and adiponectin concentrations compared to those observed at baseline and to a control diet. A simple dietary manipulation of carbohydrate distribution appears to have additional benefits when compared to a conventional weight loss diet in individuals suffering from obesity. It might also be beneficial for individuals suffering from insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Further research is required to confirm and clarify the mechanisms by which this relatively simple diet approach enhances satiety, leads to better anthropometric outcomes, and achieves improved metabolic response, compared to a more conventional dietary approach.
    Don't be a 'Bro'..... Believe nothing....Question everything

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    Stop over thinking nutrition - If you want something to think about download Myfitnesspal and learn how to count macros




  14. #14
    jypoll's Avatar
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    I agree. if you only have so many carbs in a day, would you not want to eat all of them around your workout? thus increasing your performance?
    i have 120g of carbs about 2 hours before bed but only because this is my pwo meal. immediatly before bed i have 12g only because protein shake pb and cottage cheese are not carb free.

    but if your training session is 6+ hours before bed you should not waste your carbs right before bed, they should be before/after your workout

  15. #15
    jpowell is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by baseline_9
    Carbs at any time CAN make you gain bodyfat..... What is so different about eating carbs at night? Personally I believe in keeping carbs around training no matter what time that is

    Body composition, nutrient intake and physical activity patterns in young women during Ramadan.

    Al-Hourani HM, Atoum MF.

    Source

    Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, The Hashemite University, PO Box 150459, Zarqa 13115, Jordan. hhourani@hu.edu.jo

    Abstract
    INTRODUCTION:
    Muslims abstain from food and fluid between the hours of sunrise to sunset, and usually eat a large meal after sunset and a lighter meal before sunrise. The purpose of this study was to assess body composition, nutrient intake and physical activity patterns during Ramadan fasting.
    METHODS:
    This study was carried out during Ramadan in October 2004. A total of 57 female subjects were recruited from The Hashemite University in Jordan. Body weight, fat percentage, muscle mass, and percentage body water content were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Estimated food records over a duration of three days were used to assess the intake of energy, carbohydrates, protein, fat, and sugars before and during Ramadan fasting. Physical activity patterns were determined from a three-day activity diary before and during Ramadan fasting; the amount of physical activity was expressed as the physical activity level.
    RESULTS:
    Body weight and BMI decreased significantly during Ramadan fasting. The mean energy and nutrients intake before Ramadan (energy; percent carbohydratesrotein:fat was 1,252; 56:12:33) and during Ramadan (1,171; 56:13:34) were not significantly different. The mean physical activity level was 1.54 before Ramadan and 1.51 during Ramadan, and this was also not significantly different.
    CONCLUSION:
    This study revealed that there was a significant weight loss during Ramadan. Estimates of energy, carbohydrates, protein, fat and sugar did not change, despite the reduction in the number of meals taken. The overall activity patterns remained similar

    **Granted this study does not state what the BF% was after, however it does state that there was a significant loss in weight....

    Chronobiological aspects of weight loss in obesity: effects of different meal timing regimens.

    Sensi S, Capani F.

    Source
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Chieti, Italy.

    Abstract
    A series of short- and long-lasting experimental protocols of different meal timing regimes were performed in obese subjects to assess the possible occurrence of (1) a different metabolic fate of nutrients; (2) a phase shift of circadian rhythms of metabolic and hormonal parameters strictly related to nutrition; (3) a different weight loss. (A) In a short-lasting protocol (3 days) 15 obese subjects were fed a hypocaloric diet (684 kcal/day) (a) at 10 hr only, (b) at 1800 hr only; (c) at 1000 hr, 1400 hr and 1800 hr, or (d) studied during a 36-hr fasting. Measures of calorimetry (R.Q., CHO and lipid oxidations, energy expenditure), hormones (plasma cortisol, insulin , HGH, urinary catecholamines), urinary electrolytes (Na, K) and vital parameters (body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure) were carried out at 4-hr intervals for three days. A significantly higher lipid oxidation and a lower CHO oxidation were documented with the meal at 1800 hr, in comparison with the meal at 1000 hr. CHO and lipid oxidation circadian rhythms appeared the most affected by meal timing. (B) In a long-lasting protocol (18 days) 10 obese subjects were fed the same hypocaloric diet (a) at 1000 hr only and (b) at 1800 hr only. Calorimetric measures were performed every other day for 2 hr preceding each meal. Before and after the 18-days single meal period, body temperature, plasma cortisol, PRL and TSH were recorded (delta t = 4 hr). A higher lipid oxidation and a lower CHO oxidation were again demonstrated with the meal at 18 hr. Minimal changes of hormonal circadian rhythms were documented suggesting that the hypothalamus-hypophysis network is scarcely affected by meal timing. Weight loss did not vary in both short- and long-term protocol.

    Extract from an article on Science daily

    scientists studied 16 female rhesus monkeys that were placed on a high-fat diet similar in composition to the diet normally consumed by humans in the United States and other Western countries. During the study, all of the monkeys had their ovaries removed - this simulates a menopause-like state in female monkeys similar to human female menopause. In lower animals both high fat diet and decreased ovarian function lead to weight gain. The contribution of menopause to weight gain in middle-aged women has not been well established, perhaps because many other life style changes generally occur during this period of life, such as changes in eating habits and exercise habits as children grow up and leave home. In this study monkeys did gain about 5% more weight after their ovaries were removed providing clear evidence that ovarian hormones contribute to weight balance in primates, as well as in lower animals. These results were presented at the 2003 Society for Neuroscience Meeting.
    The researchers then observed the monkeys for one year. In addition to studying their weight gain, researchers noted how much and when the animals ate, which varied dramatically among the animals observed. Specifically, the researchers found that the monkeys ate between 6 percent and 64 percent of their total calories at night. This is comparable to reports in humans who take in approximately 24 percent to 65 percent of total calories at night.
    "It was really interesting to see that the monkeys who ate most of their food at night were no more likely to gain weight than monkeys who rarely ate at night," said Elinor Sullivan, an OHSU graduate student conducting research along with Cameron at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. "This suggests that calories cause weight gain no matter when you eat them."

    Weight loss is greater with consumption of large morning meals and fat-free mass is preserved with large evening meals in women on a controlled weight reduction regimen.

    Keim NL, Van Loan MD, Horn WF, Barbieri TF, Mayclin PL.

    Source
    U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Presidio of San Francisco, CA 94129, USA.

    Abstract
    The purpose of this study was to determine whether meal ingestion pattern [large morning meals (AM) vs. large evening meals (PM)] affects changes in body weight, body composition or energy utilization during weight loss. Ten women completed a metabolic ward study of 3-wk weight stabilization followed by 12 wk of weight loss with a moderately energy restricted diet [mean energy intake +/- SD = 107 +/- 6 kJ/(kg.d)] and regular exercise. The weight loss phase was divided into two 6-wk periods. During period 1, 70% of daily energy intake was taken as two meals in the AM (n = 4) or in the PM (n = 6). Subjects crossed over to the alternate meal time in period 2. Both weight loss and fat-free mass loss were greater with the AM than the PM meal pattern: 3.90 +/- 0.19 vs. 3.27 +/- 0.26 kg/6 wk, P < 0.05, and 1.28 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.16 kg/6 wk, P < 0.001, respectively. Change in fat mass and loss of body energy were affected by order of meal pattern ingestion. The PM pattern resulted in greater loss of fat mass in period 1 (P < 0.01) but not in period 2. Likewise, resting mid-afternoon fat oxidation rate was higher with the PM pattern in period 1 (P < 0.05) but not in period 2, corresponding with the fat mass changes. To conclude, ingestion of larger AM meals resulted in slightly greater weight loss, but ingestion of larger PM meals resulted in better maintenance of fat-free mass. Thus, incorporation of larger PM meals in a weight loss regimen may be important in minimizing the loss of fat-free mass.

    Martin Berkhan Quote.... '' in controlled studies, late eating patterns are superior for fat loss and body composition.''

    Greater weight loss and hormonal changes after 6 months diet with carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner.

    Sofer S, Eliraz A, Kaplan S, Voet H, Fink G, Kima T, Madar Z.

    Source
    The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Institute of Biochemistry and Food Science, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.

    Abstract
    This study was designed to investigate the effect of a low-calorie diet with carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner on anthropometric, hunger/satiety, biochemical, and inflammatory parameters. Hormonal secretions were also evaluated. Seventy-eight police officers (BMI >30) were randomly assigned to experimental (carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner) or control weight loss diets for 6 months. On day 0, 7, 90, and 180 blood samples and hunger scores were collected every 4 h from 0800 to 2000 hours. Anthropometric measurements were collected throughout the study. Greater weight loss, abdominal circumference, and body fat mass reductions were observed in the experimental diet in comparison to controls. Hunger scores were lower and greater improvements in fasting glucose, average daily insulin concentrations, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)), T-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were observed in comparison to controls. The experimental diet modified daily leptin and adiponectin concentrations compared to those observed at baseline and to a control diet. A simple dietary manipulation of carbohydrate distribution appears to have additional benefits when compared to a conventional weight loss diet in individuals suffering from obesity. It might also be beneficial for individuals suffering from insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Further research is required to confirm and clarify the mechanisms by which this relatively simple diet approach enhances satiety, leads to better anthropometric outcomes, and achieves improved metabolic response, compared to a more conventional dietary approach.
    this study is on ramadan and women at that. ur comparing apples to oranges. u cant compare a muslim women who fast allday and can only eat when the sun is down, to guys who may b on steroids and train heavy. theres no logic to that. u can highlight this m that, but rhere is mo relevance. its like saying hey, my orange has more seeds than ur grapefruit has mass.

  16. #16
    Big Balta's Avatar
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    So a person should keep the most filling meals around a workout. That makes sense. And if I workout late (like 8 o'clock) then my biggest meals would be around that time (before and after). And it wouldn't matter if I ate carbs that late because my workout was that late.

    My workouts change on occasion depending on how busy I am. I tend to work out around 6 nowadays. I go to bed around 11:30/12.

    One thing I want to say is that I've heard and read that the energy you have today for your workout is dependent on the foods you ate YESTERDAY.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Balta View Post
    So a person should keep the most filling meals around a workout. That makes sense. And if I workout late (like 8 o'clock) then my biggest meals would be around that time (before and after). And it wouldn't matter if I ate carbs that late because my workout was that late.

    My workouts change on occasion depending on how busy I am. I tend to work out around 6 nowadays. I go to bed around 11:30/12.

    One thing I want to say is that I've heard and read that the energy you have today for your workout is dependent on the foods you ate YESTERDAY.
    yes yesterdays meals will help you. thats why you eat a large amount of complex carbs after your workout (too refill muscle glycogen) for tomorrows workout.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpowell View Post
    this study is on ramadan and women at that. ur comparing apples to oranges. u cant compare a muslim women who fast allday and can only eat when the sun is down, to guys who may b on steroids and train heavy. theres no logic to that. u can highlight this m that, but rhere is mo relevance. its like saying hey, my orange has more seeds than ur grapefruit has mass.
    Did u just read the first paper?


    Guys, its not as clear cut as carbs at night make you fat.... There are simply too many variables to make such a blanket statement like that.


    Can anyone explain the difference between eating 200g of carbs in the morning vs 200g of carbs before you go to bed......
    Don't be a 'Bro'..... Believe nothing....Question everything

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    Stop over thinking nutrition - If you want something to think about download Myfitnesspal and learn how to count macros




  19. #19
    baseline_9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Balta View Post
    So a person should keep the most filling meals around a workout. That makes sense. And if I workout late (like 8 o'clock) then my biggest meals would be around that time (before and after). And it wouldn't matter if I ate carbs that late because my workout was that late.

    My workouts change on occasion depending on how busy I am. I tend to work out around 6 nowadays. I go to bed around 11:30/12.

    One thing I want to say is that I've heard and read that the energy you have today for your workout is dependent on the foods you ate YESTERDAY.
    In your case I would consume the PWO shake containing some complex carbs at about 9.30ish??? Then a PPWO meal WITH CARBS at about 10.30...
    Don't be a 'Bro'..... Believe nothing....Question everything

    Baseline - Working to phase out this generation of Bro-Scientists

    Stop over thinking nutrition - If you want something to think about download Myfitnesspal and learn how to count macros




  20. #20
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    Me! Me! Me!

    When you eat carbs in the morning you burn them throughout the day.

    At night, you're not doing anything but sleeping.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Balta View Post
    Me! Me! Me!

    When you eat carbs in the morning you burn them throughout the day.

    At night, you're not doing anything but sleeping.

    what is the primary fuel source utilised during the day for low intensity activities like walking around and just generally being awake.....

    And would burning carbs during the day be a good thing for muscle building... Sounds like a shit idea to me
    Last edited by baseline_9; 04-03-2012 at 10:29 AM.
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  22. #22
    haterade's Avatar
    haterade is offline Associate Member
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    op.. as a bodybuilder u want to spread your carbs throughout the day.. depending on how many meals are in your diet and what your goals are.. for me my last carb meal is post workout (im done training after around 7pm ish),, i usually have 2 meals after that with a protein source and some fiber source.. but it is true if you want loose fat u have to change your overall diet not just one meal..

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