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  1. #1
    nobber is offline New Member
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    Oats and fructose

    For breakfast I cook up half a cup of dried oats with a tablespoon of brown sugar and some cinnamon and eat it alongside a scoop of whey. But, I just found out that brown sugar is just white sugar with molasses in it. Would switching from brown sugar to fructose be better? I've been told that fructose has a lower GI and it's sweeter, so I would probably need less of it.

    Does anyone have any info on this? I can't eat cooked oats straight up. It reminds me too much of vomit.

  2. #2
    tarmyg's Avatar
    tarmyg is online now Knowledgeable Member
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    Sugar is the devil and science is finally starting to prove it :-) Why not use alternative sweeteners? Stevia perhaps, I hate the "lab made" stuff so I stick so Stevia the few times I use it which was a while back I must admit.

    Thanks
    ~T

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  3. #3
    Docd187123 is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by nobber View Post
    For breakfast I cook up half a cup of dried oats with a tablespoon of brown sugar and some cinnamon and eat it alongside a scoop of whey. But, I just found out that brown sugar is just white sugar with molasses in it. Would switching from brown sugar to fructose be better? I've been told that fructose has a lower GI and it's sweeter, so I would probably need less of it.

    Does anyone have any info on this? I can't eat cooked oats straight up. It reminds me too much of vomit.
    Why are you worried about the high glycemic index of the brown sugar when the fiber, fat, and protein content of your bfast will lower the glycemic load of the entire meal thus negating the issue of high GI sugar? Fructose is lower GI than sucrse but fructose can't fill muscle glycogen stores either, only liver glycogen. So are you worried something that likely will have no impact on your body composition?

  4. #4
    nobber is offline New Member
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    I wasn't aware of the concept of glycemic load. I googled it a bit this morning and the calculations seem to only factor in available carbs and the GI of the foods you consume, not fiber/fat/protein. Is this correct?

    Here's what I came up with for the GL of a third cup of oats + brown sugar:


    Available carbs is 1/3 cup of oats: 15g
    Available carbs in 1 tbsp of brown sugar: 12g

    Total available carbs: 27g

    % of available carbs for oatmeal: 15g / 27g = 0.56
    % of available carbs for brown sugar: 12g / 27g = 0.44

    GI of oats: 55GI
    GI of brown sugar: 64GI

    Merged GI: (64GI * 0.56) + (55GI * 0.44) = 35.84 + 24.2 = 60.4GI

    Merged GL: 27g * 60.4GI / 100 = 16.2


    16.2 would put that at medium GL.

    What should the GL of breakfast, and post workout be? I do my lifts in the mornings.

  5. #5
    Docd187123 is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by nobber View Post
    I wasn't aware of the concept of glycemic load. I googled it a bit this morning and the calculations seem to only factor in available carbs and the GI of the foods you consume, not fiber/fat/protein. Is this correct?

    Here's what I came up with for the GL of a third cup of oats + brown sugar:


    Available carbs is 1/3 cup of oats: 15g
    Available carbs in 1 tbsp of brown sugar: 12g

    Total available carbs: 27g

    % of available carbs for oatmeal: 15g / 27g = 0.56
    % of available carbs for brown sugar: 12g / 27g = 0.44

    GI of oats: 55GI
    GI of brown sugar: 64GI

    Merged GI: (64GI * 0.56) + (55GI * 0.44) = 35.84 + 24.2 = 60.4GI

    Merged GL: 27g * 60.4GI / 100 = 16.2


    16.2 would put that at medium GL.

    What should the GL of breakfast, and post workout be? I do my lifts in the mornings.
    IMO you're trying to micro manage your diet in this case which will not net you any discernible benefits. Only those with diabetes or particular medical conditions should be concerned with GI or quick and slow carbs. My point was to tell you that sucrose for example is a quick digesting carb. But if you take sucrose and eat it with some protein for example or some dietary fat, the digestion rate of the sucrose slows down and doesn't cause the same insulin response. The rate of digestion of any carb can be slowed down by simply eating it with protein and/or fat. And on top of that, what is inherently wrong with fast digesting carbs? Do you think your body composition will change if comparing slow vs fast digesting carbs in a eucaloric diet? It won't.

    For oats, I usually add some cinnamon, some fruit (blueberries, banana, strawberries, apple, blackberries, raspberries, etc) a tsp or so of some homemade honey (bc I like the taste better than store bought), and sometimes ill sub the honey for a piece of 85%dark chocolate and let it melt in there or even a bit of vanilla extract.

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