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Thread: Tendonitis

  1. #1
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    Tendonitis

    Since there are so many questions about tendonitis and tendonosis, here are some tips and general information!

    Tendonitis is a very common injury that occurs in athletics. They usually occur as a result of doing too much. The more is better approach usually leads to many repetitive stress injuries, which only hampers training time and causes more frustration in the long run. The types that are that most prevalent are Achilles, patellar, medial and lateral elbow, biceps and rotator cuff tendonitis.

    The primary reason tendonitis occurs as a result of excessive loading. The muscle is not able to handle the forces and stresses that are placed upon it, so this extra stress must go somewhere....which is the tendon. If the tendon can not handle this stress, the individual will experience pain and discomfort in that area. Other common symptoms of tendonitis are inflammation, tenderness and swelling.

    Tendonitis can also occur as a result muscle weakness. This is usually remedied by specific muscle group strengthening. Another manner in which tendonitis can occur is through excessive torque at the area of tenderness, which is caused by weak musculature up and down the chain, tight musculature up and down the chain, or improper mechanics. This can all be remedied by strengthening, stretching and teaching proper mechanics and technique.

    Tendonitis is a frustrating injury to deal with. Most athletes will continue to work through this and will end up causing more damage. If the tendon continues to be stressed and it can no longer handle this stress, the stress will travel to the bone. This can lead to stress fractures and other types of bone breaks. Sometimes this might not happen, but the pain will continue to stick around. Long term tendonitis is known as tendonosis. The same type of pain will be experienced by the athlete, but there is no inflammation.

    Treating tendonosis should be different than treatment for tendonitis. Treatment for tendonitis can be accomplished through icing, stretching, rest, eccentric loading, electric stimulation, ultra-sound, and NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). The primary treatment for tendonosis is rest. It is important to evaluate the athlete for specific tightnesses and weaknesses that may contribute to the pain they are experiencing. This is often attributed to poor posture and repetitive stress.

    Knowing the difference between tendonitis and tendonosis will help in giving the proper treatment to a faster recovery. It is important to realize what is actually causing the pain and to treat it properly. Look to treat the cause of the problem and not just relieve the symptoms. Once the cause can be found and treated, the pain will naturally subside. Always have your athletes report pain to a certified athletic trainer so they can provide the proper care. Training smarter will always last longer than training harder.
    __________________________________________________ _______________
    2:The elbow is a complex intersection of three bones--the humerus in the upper arm and the ulna and radius of the forearm--that enables extension, flexion and rotation and facilitates the function of the hands. The muscles and tendons of the forearm, which insert at the elbow, serve to stabilize the wrist, and when they become inflamed through overuse, repetitive motion or poor form you get pain and limited range of motion (Tendonitis) As for long-lasting pain directly on the back of the elbow joint, that may be an indication of bursitis.

    But most ordinary elbow problems stem from overuse. Two of the best-known and most-suffered ailments are lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) and medial epicondylitis (golfer's elbow). The tennis type occurs when the extensor muscles in the forearm become inflamed on the outside of the elbow. Similarly, duffers often find that the muscles and tendons that flex their fingers and wrists become aggravated on the inner side of the elbow.

    Don't think you can switch to volleyball and be safe. Any sport or activity that requires a strong grip, repeated or forceful movements, a clenched fist, or turning and twisting movements of the forearm muscles can be the culprit, whether you're lifting weights or painting the house.

    Elbow injuries are often the result of poor form or repetitive bad habits, like twisting your wrists at the end of a triceps pull-down. In all honesty it's far better to protect your elbows with proper form while doing your main training than to rehab them before or after your workouts.

    Your elbows are especially vulnerable if you try to do too much when starting a new exercise program, or if you accelerate the intensity of an existing routine too quickly. One of the most important rules of training is to give your body adequate time to recover between each workout. Not only does this help avoid over training it will help you avoid injury.

    One thing to consider...is if your form is poor you could be making a minor injury worse. Be sure you assess your biomechanical factors well: Body alignment, pronation or supination of your feet, or even old injuries that were never properly rehabilitated can be weak links that should be addressed by someone who knows how to correct your form (which can be hard in a lot of gyms, becaue knowledgable people are often hard to find)

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    Exercises to strengthen your forearms can be helpful, both to promote recovery and to prevent future problems. As you do the following exercises, pay attention to your form and the position of your wrists. Do three sets of each exercise, working up to 30 reps or muscle exhaustion. If you're injured, start with light weights (two or three pounds), and increase as your strength improves.

    1. STANDING ARM CURL Stand holding a dumbbell at your side with your palm facing forward (1a). Bend the elbow and lift the weight to your shoulder (1b). Slowly lower to the starting position. Keep your wrist straight.

    2. REVERSE ARM CURL Stand holding a dumbbell at your side with your palm facing backward (2a). Bend the elbow and lift the weight to your shoulder (2b). Slowly lower to the starting position. Again, keep your wrist straight.

    3. WRIST CURL Stand holding a dumbbell at your side with your palm facing forward (3a). Flex your wrist forward (3b) and back to the starting position.

    4. REVERSE WRIST CURL Stand holding a dumbbell at your side with your palm facing backward (4a). Flex your wrist up as far as it will go (4b) and return to the starting position.

    5. ELBOW STRETCH #1 Extend your left arm straight out and parallel to the floor, with the elbow locked and your palm facing down. With your right hand, pull the fingers on your left hand down toward the floor, bending your wrist. (The arm doesn't move.) Hold for 15 to 20 seconds. Switch arms.

    6. ELBOW STRETCH #2 Extend your left arm straight out and parallel to the floor, with the elbow locked and your palm facing up. With your right hand, pull your left hand back and the fingers toward the floor. Hold for 15 to 20 seconds. Switch arms.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------


    Have you ever heard the Term "Rice" in the gym? If so here is what it means...

    RICE: rest, ice, compression and elevation

    A little trick I learned from from AM...You take several dixie cups and fill them with water. Place them in your freezer and allow them to freeze. In the evenings while you're sitting around doing nothing...Take one of those dixie cups that you have in the freezer and use it to massage anything that hurts (Including forearms..elbows..triceps) on your body (with the ice directly against your skin)...As it melts..just peel down the dixie cup exposing more ice...Fairly simple but highly effective..

    I HIGHLY recommend ice. And I've grown to be a believer in linament...and not just any linament...Horse linament

    1. Proper form and avoid over training

    2. Do prehab exercises like I listed above

    3. Ice packs 10-20 minutes post workout..

    4. Linament (preferably Horse linament) during and after workouts

    5. Ice massages with good ol fashionedl frozen dixie cups of water
    __________________________________________________ _______________
    3:Tendonitis and Tenosynovitis

    --An inflammation of the tendon (tendonitis) and lining of the tendon sheath (tenosynovitis) characterized by pain on movement of the associated joint.

    Causes and Incidence The etiology is often unknown, but individuals are thought to be more susceptible as degenerative changes occur in the vascularity of the tendons, causing a slower response to repetitive microtrauma. Repetitive movements, strain, or excessive, unaccustomed exercise may be causes. Underlying systemic disease (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, gout, sclerosis, and disseminated gonococcal infections) may also be a cause. Middle-aged and older adults and athletes or individuals with occupations requiring repetitive motion are at greatest risk.

    Disease Process Repetitive microtrauma damages the fibers in the common extensor tendon of the involved joint, causing extravasations of tissue fluid and setting up an inflammatory process. Over time, healing builds fibrous, inelastic tissue and scarring, which often bind the tendon and sheath together, limiting joint motion.

    Symptoms The involved tendons usually show visible swelling; the joint may be tender and hot to the touch; motion of the joint causes pain.

    Potential Complications Rupture of the tendon is a possible complication.

    Diagnostic Tests The diagnosis is based on a history of repetitive motion or underlying disease and physical examination of the joint. Radiology may show calcium deposits in the tendon or tendon sheath.

    Treatments

    Surgery
    Removal of calcium deposits in cases unresponsive to other treatment; release of fibroosseous tunnels associated with de Quervain's disease; tenosynovectomy for chronic inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    Drugs
    Oral or locally injected corticosteroids to relieve inflammation; analgesics/anti-inflammatory drugs to relieve pain

    General
    Moist heat compresses to joint; rest of joint with controlled progressive exercise program

    Tendon , one of many white, glistening fibrous bands of tissue that attach muscle to bone. Except at points of attachment, tendons are tubular shaped in delicate fibroblastic connective tissue. Larger tendons have a thin inner dividing wall (septum), a few blood vessels, and specialized stereognostic nerves. Tendons are extremely strong and flexible, inelastic, and occur in various lengths and thickness.

    Corticosteroid /kor'tikostir'oid/, any one of the hormones made in the outer layer of the adrenal gland (adrenal cortex). They influence or control key functions of the body, as making carbohydrates and proteins, working of the heart and lung systems, and functions of the muscles, kidneys, and other organs. The release of these hormones increases during stress, especially in anxiety and severe injury. Too much of these hormones in the body is linked with various disorders, as Cushing's syndrome. The skeletal muscles need the correct amount of corticosteroids to work normally. Corticosteroids can also be given to patients to help certain disorders, as swelling or failure of the glands to make enough for the body

    Excerpted from Mosby's Medical Encyclopedia. Copyright (c) 1994-5, 1996, 1997 The Learning Company Inc. All Rights Reserved
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  2. #2
    Doc.Sust's Avatar
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    GREAT POST!!! GOOD INFO!! i may have some more to add to this later.

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    liftergirl is offline Female Member
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    i agree--good post-- and mosby's is a good reference too. These topics can affect a lot of people in a big spectrum of ways....from just an annoyance to something that can take you out of an entire season of exercise! The "rice" therapy is a great recommendation too!

  4. #4
    kman's Avatar
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    great post. I suffer from patella tendonosis, it sucks, and I have tried almost everything. I went to top doctors in NYC and the bottom line they told me, is that this might just be something I will have to deal with. That answer is not acceptable for me, so I will keep trying to get this better. GREAT INFO... NICE POST

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    liftergirl is offline Female Member
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    k man--- when they diagnosed you with patella tendonosis, what scans did they do; what injuries have you suffered from in the past? what were their recommendations?

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    OldPLer's Avatar
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    Good Information,

  7. #7
    kman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by liftergirl
    k man--- when they diagnosed you with patella tendonosis, what scans did they do; what injuries have you suffered from in the past? what were their recommendations?
    X rays, MRI, and bone scan.. I play a highly repeatitve sport and have had some sore knees awhile back, and I just popped some vioxx for a quick fix to mask the pain for awhile. I was stupid and young, and thought time off would lose me sponsors and money. I have done rehab to strenghten my hips, t band, quads, you name it. I have also taken time off, and was prescribed dexamethasone to strenghten the tendon. The doctors said that at my age and in my current situation, that I can just rough it out for the rest of my career, but it is limiting me, and frustrating.. Any advice is appreciated, and thanks for the response and concern..

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    Doc.Sust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kman
    X rays, MRI, and bone scan.. I play a highly repeatitve sport and have had some sore knees awhile back, and I just popped some vioxx for a quick fix to mask the pain for awhile. I was stupid and young, and thought time off would lose me sponsors and money. I have done rehab to strenghten my hips, t band, quads, you name it. I have also taken time off, and was prescribed dexamethasone to strenghten the tendon. The doctors said that at my age and in my current situation, that I can just rough it out for the rest of my career, but it is limiting me, and frustrating.. Any advice is appreciated, and thanks for the response and concern..
    what sport do you play and what position? if you dont want to answer this on the board, i understand if it is to personal, but you could also PM me if you feel comfortable.

  9. #9
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    thanks for this post, it was indeed a lot of help.

  10. #10
    needmorestrength's Avatar
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    Sweet its a sticky! lol

  11. #11
    Doc.Sust's Avatar
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    you deservd it man, it is a great article, if you have anymore that are sticky worthy send them my way or anything you would like add to the new stickys i posted as well

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    dogman69 is offline Associate Member
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    great post very informative have alot problems ith tend. in my elbows thanks

  13. #13
    wiggleworm is offline New Member
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    Tendonitis question and GH

    Hi All,

    i read everything about tendinitis. Just before going on Tren and deca , i developed bad tendinitis in my elbos, Golfers elbow. I did one round of cortisone shots in August. Everything felt great. I started Tren and Deca and everything was perfect. Just recently my arms started to hurt again. I have been off juice since end of November. I just recently acquired Genotropin, some more Tren, deca,

    my arms hurt. Will genotropin start the healing process. Of have heard that it will but i want to be sure. Summer is approaching and i want to time everything perfectly. I plan on taking February off all together to heal.

    any recommendations are well appreciated.

    thanks.

  14. #14
    Doc.Sust's Avatar
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    cortisone is a quick fix. it very rarely fixes the problem. the hgh may help but it isnt guaranteed

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    gabrieljosh is offline New Member
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    Just wanna share this...

    Repetitive stress injuries can come from many causes. Other factors should also be considered as contributing to stress in all cases. Being overweight or pregnant or having high stress levels in general can certainly take a toll on certain joints. Once you have been diagnosed with repetitive stress injury, all of these factors must be taken into consideration before the most effective course of treatment can be prescribed by your doctor.

  16. #16
    xephonics is offline Associate Member
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    Suppercissus Rx has helped my tendinitis several times over the years. No I am not a employee, just a very satisfied customer. I had a horrid case of elbow tendinitis in bother arms, and supercissus can get rid of it within 1-2 weeks (but the caveat it you need to stay on it, or it will come back over time).

    Within 2 weeks my hammer curl went from 20lbs (and being up all night in pain) to 70lbs and only 1-2 mins of minor pain.

  17. #17
    golfaddict09 is offline New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kman View Post
    X rays, MRI, and bone scan.. I play a highly repeatitve sport and have had some sore knees awhile back, and I just popped some vioxx for a quick fix to mask the pain for awhile. I was stupid and young, and thought time off would lose me sponsors and money. I have done rehab to strenghten my hips, t band, quads, you name it. I have also taken time off, and was prescribed dexamethasone to strenghten the tendon. The doctors said that at my age and in my current situation, that I can just rough it out for the rest of my career, but it is limiting me, and frustrating.. Any advice is appreciated, and thanks for the response and concern..
    Have you looked into Prolotherapy or PRP? I have read very good things about this treatment and am considering having it done. I have Tendinopothy in my right knee and it sucks, can't run, can't jump, slowly withering away without intense cardio.

    If anyone on here has had it and can give some results, that would be appreciated.

  18. #18
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    Great post with some good advice.I've hyper extended my wrist a few times when i was younger and ive lost a lot of range of motion since i've gotten older possibly from calcium deposits(?)
    It definately interferes with technique on some of my weight training obviously makes my wrist work a test of wills!
    I've tried glucosamine in the past and am doing some stretching to loosen things up but i really need to add iceing it to the routine.

  19. #19
    allen47 is offline Banned
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    Tendonitis is a common condition that can cause significant pain. Tendonitis occurs when there is inflammation of tendons-the point where a muscle attaches

  20. #20
    Lowtest85 is offline New Member
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    Great post, i have tendonitis in my left elbow which sucks, but i'll definitely be trying out these excericises and tips, Cheers !

  21. #21
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    I know this is an old post but It is something that concerns almost everyone here either yesterday, today or tomorrow. I have been nursing a bad wrist for the past 4-5 weeks and it has been improving and I wanted to share my experience. 1) Instead of the commonly accepted R.I.C.E, i like to alternate hot and cold packs on the troubled area with 3 minute intervals. It increases circulation to the area which is key for tendon repair. 2) Massage, also increases circulation and 3) Go to the butcher shop (I'm not talking the meat section at StopnShop or Pathmark, cuz u wont find it there) and get you hands on a big ol cow leg/hip bone. have the butcher chop it up into 2 or 3 pieces (its big). Boil it until cooked (throw a sliced apple and onion in cause it smells). Use a spoon to scoop the bone marrow and mix it with the broth and drink it. Probably gonna have to squeeze a lemon in there as well, sure as hell dont taste like brownies. Anyway, this 3 step recovery is something that I got from a professional arm wrestler buddy of mine. He said its common knowledge in the professional and they all do it when they have tendon injuries. Seems to be working so I wanted to pass it on to you guys because noting is more devasting to morale than not being able to go to the gym due to an injury.

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    bobsyouruncle is offline New Member
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    thanks for the info ive been having problems with my knee

  23. #23
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    Lol.....I can't think of a body part I haven't had tendinitis in!!!!! Lol

  24. #24
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    AWESOME tips here! Thank you for this! Tendonitis is something I consistently deal with as well. I am at a tendonitis-free point right now (knock on wood), but have used the RICE method with success when it does flare up.

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    How realistic dose it sound to you guys that some one can develop patellar tendonitis after arthroscopy knee surgery!?

    I have a thread " pain after knee surgery" . Just wondering ?

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    gonebluffn is offline Associate Member
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    No offense but IMO you should have read everything about the compounds you are running simultaneously other than everything about tendonitis and I maybe wrong but I would be willing to bet the hgh you have is bunk .

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    gonebluffn is offline Associate Member
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    Sorry that was directed to wiggleworm didnt add quote.

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    Fantastic info - always looking for ways to mitigate problems with tendonitis. Need to do more forearm exercises.

  29. #29
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    http://www.proband.com/testimonials.php-----what do the more knowledgeable persons here think of this thing?

  30. #30
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    Since starting my first cycle 4 weeks ago with test/eq, my knees and wrists have gotten way better, almost perfect. However my tendons(I think), opposite of the elbow(in between the top of the forearm and the bicep) give me alot of hell. I took a long time off work for hernia surgey and when I started lifting again, the pain came back. I'm always looking for a solution and will try everything I can to fix it. I have used shark cartiledge and a couple other things with no help. Does anybody else have this and have fixed it?

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    cc5501 is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you, great read.

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    Bigk2014 is offline New Member
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    That's the problem with doctors these days they don't want to solve problems they just want to mask them :/. Good read.

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    Perkfit is offline New Member
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    I've had tendonosis in my knees for 2 years now. I have tried everything, massage, acupuncture, chiropractors, art, stretching, myofacial release, rest, ice, anti inflammatories, Vicodin, you name it. Nothing has worked! What is the concensus on doing a cycle while battling this? Will it work? Make worse? This is where I've turned to get better but I want to make sure I'm not wasting my time. Thoughts please?!? Also, are some steroids better than others for strengthening joints? Thank you

  34. #34
    Chicagotarsier is offline Senior Member
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    Nice Post....

    Just to add you left off the second most common reason for tendonitis...Uric Acid buildup in cartlidge vessels. If you are anywhere near top of range in UA you will have these issues.

    Take your anti inflams and you can avoid a lot of hassle.

  35. #35
    TheFenrir is offline New Member
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    Great post!
    I've been looking for something like it. had to take a sodding month off training because of it. For me personally icing on a regular basis and stretching made a huge difference. Someone always recommended me to use the splint that people who have CTS use. Didn't make much of a difference though, just made doing everyday things infuriatingly frustrating.

  36. #36
    uhit's Avatar
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    Had Bicep tendonitis recently. Followed your protocol, took 2 weeks off and it feels much better.

    Thank you very much

  37. #37
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    I hyperextended my wrist in the military (among many other injuries that I was just given motrin and water for haha) and suffer from extreme off and on pain as a result. I've found Feldene cuts down on the pain pretty well since I don't have access to the VA right now since i'm overseas doing contract work. At least here you don't need a prescription for anything.

  38. #38
    infidel007 is offline New Member
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    I love these informative posts! I've been throwing weights and opponents around for 25 years and work a very unforgiving trade. I'm all busted up. So THANK YOU for the insight!!

  39. #39
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    Great info here. I’ve had tendonosis in both forearms for years and I’ve found physio to be completely useless for me. The only thing that’s worked for me is start working out biceps with cables instead of dumbbells. It must be something to do with the different angles or different stabilizers being used but I’m able to actually work out my biceps pretty decently now.

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