Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: DMSO gel

  1. #1
    Brazensol's Avatar
    Brazensol is offline Productive Member~ Recognized Member Winner - $100
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,496

    DMSO gel

    How often can you apply this stuff?

  2. #2
    austinite's Avatar
    austinite is offline HRT Specialist ~ AR-Platinum Elite-Hall of Famer ~
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cialis, Texas
    Posts
    31,154
    depends on the purpose.
    ~ PLEASE DO NOT ASK FOR SOURCE CHECKS ~

    "It's human nature in a 'more is better' society full of a younger generation that expects instant gratification, then complain when they don't get it. The problem will get far worse before it gets better". ~ kelkel

  3. #3
    Brazensol's Avatar
    Brazensol is offline Productive Member~ Recognized Member Winner - $100
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,496
    A little bit of knee pain. Went on a hike today. The downhill part always causes some pain in the right knee. Nothing severe, just annoying.

  4. #4
    austinite's Avatar
    austinite is offline HRT Specialist ~ AR-Platinum Elite-Hall of Famer ~
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cialis, Texas
    Posts
    31,154
    Braz my man, gotta give more details brother. Topical or injection? Did you buy this OTC? if so follow the instructions. I use a 70% topical and just rub on the area till it's covered evenly with a thin layer. There is no measurement unless it's injectable.
    ~ PLEASE DO NOT ASK FOR SOURCE CHECKS ~

    "It's human nature in a 'more is better' society full of a younger generation that expects instant gratification, then complain when they don't get it. The problem will get far worse before it gets better". ~ kelkel

  5. #5
    Brazensol's Avatar
    Brazensol is offline Productive Member~ Recognized Member Winner - $100
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,496
    Sorry. Didn't know about the injectable version! It is 70/30 dsmo/aloa gel. The label says not to get it in your eyes and to only use it as a solvent. lol. Just wanted to know if you can use it hourly, every 4 hours, 6 hours etc,,. Oh, I bought it over the counter (well, Amazon).

  6. #6
    austinite's Avatar
    austinite is offline HRT Specialist ~ AR-Platinum Elite-Hall of Famer ~
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cialis, Texas
    Posts
    31,154
    3 times daily should be plenty.
    ~ PLEASE DO NOT ASK FOR SOURCE CHECKS ~

    "It's human nature in a 'more is better' society full of a younger generation that expects instant gratification, then complain when they don't get it. The problem will get far worse before it gets better". ~ kelkel

  7. #7
    Brazensol's Avatar
    Brazensol is offline Productive Member~ Recognized Member Winner - $100
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,496
    Thanks. One more question. Is dmso only for joint issues or can it be used on sore muscles too?

  8. #8
    Times Roman's Avatar
    Times Roman is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Back from Afghanistan
    Posts
    27,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Brazensol View Post
    Thanks. One more question. Is dmso only for joint issues or can it be used on sore muscles too?
    DMSO (something I know a little bit about) is an amazing substance. It is an excellent transdermal carrying agent, and anything you dissolve in DMSO (a solvent) will get in the blood supply if the DMSO is applied to the skin. this can be good or bad. Good if handled properly. Bad if something gets in your DMSO that you did not intend, and then it hits the blood stream. There is a story out there that I've heard from a few different sources that you can mix with LSD, drop on a bloke's shoe, and it will penetrate the shoe, and works it's way into the blood supply, with happy trails as a result. The stuff is that powerful.

    There are a few side effects with DMSO. As it will get into the blood stream, it effects your breath. My woman would complain that my breath smelled like garlic (not good) when I used. Additionally, it will irritate the skin, and many will develop a rash with continued use.

    Here is some additional reading if you are so inclined:

    (From Wiki)

    Dimethyl sulfoxide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Medicine [edit]

    Use of DMSO in medicine dates from around 1963, when an Oregon Health & Science University Medical School team, headed by Stanley Jacob, discovered it could penetrate the skin and other membranes without damaging them and could carry other compounds into a biological system. In medicine, DMSO is predominantly used as a topical analgesic, a vehicle for topical application of pharmaceuticals, as an anti-inflammatory, and an antioxidant.[17] Because DMSO increases the rate of absorption of some compounds through organic tissues, including skin, it can be used as a drug delivery system. It is frequently compounded with antifungal medications, enabling them to penetrate not just skin but also toe and fingernails.

    In cryobiology DMSO has been used as a cryoprotectant and is still an important constituent of cryoprotectant vitrification mixtures used to preserve organs, tissues, and cell suspensions. Without it, up to 90% of frozen cells will become inactive. It is particularly important in the freezing and long-term storage of embryonic stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells, which are often frozen in a mixture of 10% DMSO, Media and 30% fetal bovine serum. In the cryogenic freezing of heteroploid cell lines (MDCK, VERO, etc.) a mixture of 10% DMSO with 90% EMEM (70% EMEM + 30% fetal bovine serum + antibiotic mixture) is used. As part of an autologous bone marrow transplant the DMSO is re-infused along with the patient's own hematopoietic stem cells.

    In a 1978 study at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio, researchers concluded that DMSO brought significant relief to the majority of the 213 patients with inflammatory genitourinary disorders that were studied.[18] They recommended DMSO for all inflammatory conditions not caused by infection or tumor in which symptoms were severe or patients failed to respond to conventional therapy.

    DMSO has been examined for the treatment of numerous conditions and ailments, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved its use only for the symptomatic relief of patients with interstitial cystitis.

    In interventional radiology, DMSO is used as a solvent for ethylene vinyl alcohol in the Onyx liquid embolic agent, which is used in embolisation, the therapeutic occlusion of blood vessels.

    In medical research, DMSO is often used as a drug vehicle in in vivo and in vitro experiments. However, when a researcher is unaware of its pleiotrophic effects, or when the control groups are not carefully planned, a bias can occur; an effect of DMSO can be falsely attributed to the drug.[19] For example, even a very low dose of DMSO has a powerful protective effect against acetaminophen induced liver injury in mice.[20]

    DMSO is metabolized to dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfone. It is subject to renal and pulmonary excretion. A possible side effect of DMSO is therefore dimethylsulfidemia, which may cause a related blood borne halitosis symptom.

    Alternative medicine [edit]

    DMSO is marketed as an alternative medicine via books with titles such as DMSO: Nature's healer. Its popularity as an alternative cure is stated to stem from a 60 Minutes documentary featuring an early proponent.[4] It is listed by the U.S. FDA as a fake cancer cure[3] and the FDA has had a "running battle" with distributors.[4] This has included Mildred Miller who promoted DMSO for a variety of disorders including arthritis, mental illness, emphysema, and cancer and wrote a book touting DMSO entitled A Little Dab Will Do Ya! (Quality Advertising, 1981). It is still listed as an ineffective alternative cancer cure by the American Cancer Society;[21] for most conditions there is insufficient evidence to state any effect[22] and most sources agree that its history of side effects when tested indicates caution when using it as a dietary supplement, for which it is heavily marketed with the usual disclaimer.

    As is common in alternative medicine, promotion is based on early results which are not balanced by comprehensive tests of efficacy and safety. In arthritis, for example, controlled studies have yielded conflicting results and there are few human studies and significant known side effects.[23]

    Veterinary medicine [edit]

    DMSO is commonly used in veterinary medicine as a liniment for horses, alone or in combination with other ingredients. In the latter case, often, the intended function of the DMSO is as a solvent, to carry the other ingredients across the skin. Also in horses, DMSO is used intravenously, again alone or in combination with other drugs. It is used alone for the treatment of increased intracranial pressure and/or cerebral edema in horses.

    Safety [edit]

    Toxicity [edit]

    Early clinical trials with DMSO were stopped because of questions about its safety, especially its ability to harm the eye. The most commonly reported side effects include headaches and burning and itching on contact with the skin. Strong allergic reactions have been reported.[full citation needed] In high concentrations, DMSO can be fatal to humans.[full citation needed] Industrial-grade DMSO is sometimes contaminated with other substances. DMSO can cause contaminants, toxins, and medicines to be absorbed through the skin, which may cause unexpected effects. DMSO is thought to increase the effects of blood thinners, steroids , heart medicines, sedatives, and other drugs. In some cases this could be harmful or dangerous.[21] It is a developmental neurotoxin.[24]

    In Australia it is listed as a schedule 4 poison, and a company has been prosecuted for adding it to products as a preservative.[25]

    Because DMSO easily penetrates the skin, substances dissolved in DMSO may be quickly absorbed. Glove selection is important when working with DMSO. Thick rubber gloves are recommended. Nitrile gloves, which are very commonly used in chemical laboratories, have been found to dissolve rapidly with exposure to DMSO.[26]

    On September 9, 1965, the Wall Street Journal reported that a manufacturer of the chemical warned that the death of an Irish woman after undergoing DMSO treatment for a sprained wrist may have been due to the treatment, although no autopsy was done, nor was a causal relationship established.[27] Clinical research using DMSO was halted and did not begin again until the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published findings in favor of DMSO in 1972.[28] In 1978, the US FDA approved DMSO for treating interstitial cystitis. In 1980, the US Congress held hearings on claims that the FDA was slow in approving DMSO for other medical uses. In 2007, the US FDA granted "fast track" designation on clinical studies of DMSO's use in reducing brain tissue swelling following traumatic brain injury.[28] DMSO exposure to developing mouse brains can produce brain degeneration.[29] This neurotoxicity could be detected at doses as low as 0.3 mL/kg, a level exceeded in children exposed to DMSO during certain medical treatments.

    DMSO disposed into sewers can also cause odor problems in municipal effluents: waste water bacteria transform DMSO under hypoxic (anoxic) conditions into dimethyl sulfide (DMS) that has a strong disagreeable odor, similar to rotten cabbage.[30] However, chemically pure DMSO is odorless because of the lack of C-S-C (sulfide) and C-S-H (mercaptan) linkages. Deodorization of DMSO is achieved by removing the odorous impurities it contains.[31]

  9. #9
    Brazensol's Avatar
    Brazensol is offline Productive Member~ Recognized Member Winner - $100
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,496
    The stuff is almost scary. I will be sure that my hands are clean (of course what about the soap residue?) or use gloves (kind of a pain) before applying to the body. I used it twice yesterday after my hike and it certainly worked on my knee. I could go down the stairs without any pain and the same for doing deep knee bends.

    Only side I noticed (besides no pain of course) was a moderately intense itching that lasted about 10-15 minutes.
    Last edited by Brazensol; 05-26-2013 at 02:32 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •