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  1. #1
    Beetlegeuse's Avatar
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    Leaked Video Exposes George Floyd’s Death As Tragedy And Race Hoax Used To Divide Us

    This article is written by Jason Whitlock, who happens to be black.



    Leaked Video Exposes George Floyd’s Death As Tragedy And Race Hoax Used To Divide Us



    The videos show police verbally and physically struggling to get Floyd to comply. Floyd appears panicked, disoriented, desperate and totally non-compliant. He complains that he can’t breathe while standing on two feet. He claims his mother just died and that he can’t sit in the back of the police car because he’s claustrophobic. He repeatedly begs the officers not to shoot him. He worms the upper part of his body out of the police car and asks to lay on the ground.

    Early on during the encounter, long before the police restrain Floyd on his stomach, a female bystander shouts at Floyd to quit “resisting” and a male bystander pleads with Floyd that he can’t “win.”

    At the beginning of the video, when Floyd is behind the wheel of the car he was driving, an officer draws and points his gun when Floyd initially refuses to show both of his hands. When Floyd complies, the officer holsters his weapon.

    The behavior of the police officers seems appropriate and restrained given Floyd’s level of resistance and bizarre conduct. The footage reasonably explains how and why Floyd wound up on the ground with multiple officers restraining him.

    The video does not justify officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. But it does offer context why Chauvin would be reluctant to believe Floyd’s “I can’t breathe” cries. Nearly every word out of Floyd’s mouth was a desperate lie.

    Here are the takeaways from the footage:

    Floyd’s behavior escalated a routine arrest into a possible abuse of force.
    The George Floyd case is not a race crime. No rational person can watch that footage and conclude the police were motivated by Floyd’s black race.
    It’s going to be virtually impossible to convict former officers Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao of any crime.
    It will be equally difficult to convict Chauvin of murder....





    I would add that from the get-go Floyd is uncompliant, agitated and obstinate (if not belligerent). Under those conditions, and as powerfully built as he was, those cops would have been suicidally stupid not to expect -- and prepare for -- him to be trouble, regardless of the color of his skin.

    He starts with the "I can't breathe" stuff before he's even put in a head or neck restraint. And I hate to break it to all you cop-haters but when somebody talks non-stop while he's telling you he can't breathe, ... he's lying.

    But just as with the Ferguson shooting fraud and "Hands Up! Don't Shoot!" the chant of "I Cain't Breathe!" will be the dogwhistle used by race-mongering poverty pimps for all eternity to turn this into a conflict they can exploit for personal gain.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beetlegeuse View Post
    And I hate to break it to all you cop-haters but when somebody talks non-stop while he's telling you he can't breathe, ... he's lying.
    The flow of air required to speak is far lower than what's needed to oxygenate your blood to keep your organs going. It's possible for a person to be saying "I can't breathe" up until they lose consciousness.

    I haven't watched the video but I'll watch it now.

  3. #3
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    Seems like the guy had some untreated psych issues. Our system is pretty broken when it comes to mental health. I'm generally fairly conservative both socially and fiscally but we really need more money spent on mental health in this country.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slfmade View Post
    Seems like the guy had some untreated psych issues. Our system is pretty broken when it comes to mental health. I'm generally fairly conservative both socially and fiscally but we really need more money spent on mental health in this country.
    The fact that the system is broken doesn't equal it needs more money spent on it. Rewarding failure is always a losing proposition, like turning up the pressure on a broken water line and expecting your bath tub to fill faster. Particularly where government is involved, it's more equitable to address the inefficiencies and entrenched bureaucracy first.

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    Okay sure. Propose a solution then. Addressing inefficiencies isn't a direct solution - Perhaps an overall cost-cutting strategy that we both can agree on but it does little to help the mental health issue. Here's my point and what rubs me the wrong way. We have a huge welfare state of undeserving people that are incentivized to stay home and collect welfare that are fully capable of working and everybody seems to be okay with that. Meanwhile, we've got people with genuine mental illnesses that need help and can't get it because we treat physiologic illness different than mental illness on a welfare level. If we want to get rid of all social welfare programs and turn it back over to family, churches, communities, and charitable organizations, great. This would be ideal, and I'm on board - but our trajectory over the last (plug in your number) 60 years? has been in the opposite direction. So if we're going to continue to have these social programs we need to open it up to people with mental illness because it isn't right that Uncle Gary at 500lbs gets to sit at home on his ass eating pizza and drinking beer collecting a paycheck because he's too obese to work or because aunt Connie hurt her wrist back in 83 so she gets a free ride, and let's not forget cousin Chastity who made bad life choices and has 9 kids and no husband. Then here you have some poor girl that got raped by her uncle at 13 and now has long-standing MDD or one the 3 million Americans unlucky enough to have Schizophrenia take a hold of their brain in early adulthood and be forgotten by everybody. It's a bunch of horse shit. As I said, I'm as conservative as the next guy, maybe more so, but I don't see anybody stepping up.

    Sure, if I could make everybody listen to me and do what I think is best, Then we would go back to the family being the foundation. If no family, then the church, if no church....wait this sounds an awful lot like something I've heard Ben Shapiro say before. Hold up...Yep. Here's a piece I was almost about to subconsciously regurgitate as my own. Somebody asked Ben how he felt or what he would do about the mental health/homeless problem and the government role, etc.

    "But the idea that people who can’t take care of themselves need some sort of net is well established in American public life. But I would suggest that the place that you start is the place that everyone starts when they need help. You start with the family; if the family can’t help then you go to the community, and I mean generally the religious and social community; if that can’t help you go to local government; if that can’t help, state government; if that can’t help, federal government.

    One of the great tragedies of our mental illness system is that it’s been federalized. So it used to be that the local and state communities were largely responsible for funding mental health facilities. In the 1960s, JFK, because he had a sister who was mentally ill, thought that the federal government could do a better job and he actually imposed from above a federal system in terms of mental illness and how to take care of people who were mentally ill. That actually removed responsibility from states. States just threw the burden onto the federal government.

    It’s made facilities worse. In the 1970s there was a vast release of people who were mentally ill, and probably shouldn’t be on the streets, onto the streets. That led to a significant uptick, for example, in homelessness. A huge percentage of people who are homeless across the nation are people with severe mental illness who need to be on drugs[medicine] and are not being given their drugs[medicine] and are being told that it’s an aspect of freedom to live on the streets and live in misery. I don’t think that’s right at all.
    "

    My issue with mental health pts is that after a while it becomes too much for family and they often can't take it any longer becoming an overwhelming burden and they often turn them away or let them go on their own. I did a rotation in the hospital a while back in mental health and I'm not exaggerating when I say this, but 99% of patients were estranged from family despite full visitation privileges. I think I may have seen one family member visit once during my time there and we had a over a hundred patients. Churches occasionally help, but these are typically once in a while things like Thanksgiving, Christmas, and the occasional food drive. They rarely if ever, raise money for medical care. In the world of charitable organizations, there's tons for kids, cancer, heart disease, Alzheimers, etc. Options are few for mental health. Since these people need medical care and medical care cost money, the local or state government needs to be involved, right? And yes, by all means, State before Federal. I'm a huge supporter of state rights. But if we're failing on a fundamental people level to help them. Then we have to help them on a system level, right - starting of course with local and state? If you have another solution, I'm all ears. Because other than a survival of the fittest approach - I can't think of anything.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by slfmade View Post
    ... Addressing inefficiencies isn't a direct solution ...
    Sure it is.

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    Have it your way

  8. #8
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    The only sure cure for inefficiency is un-inefficiency. Doesn't get any more direct than that.

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