Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Doom44's Avatar
    Doom44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    582

    Anti - catabolic supplement?

    What's the best anti-catabolic supplement? BCAAs ?

  2. #2
    kelkel's Avatar
    kelkel is offline HRT Specialist ~ AR-Platinum Elite-Hall of Famer ~ No Source Checks
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    East Coast Dungeon
    Posts
    29,610
    Nutrition and rest!
    -*- NO SOURCE CHECKS -*-

  3. #3
    Doom44's Avatar
    Doom44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    582
    Quote Originally Posted by kelkel View Post
    Nutrition and rest!
    how about before cardio? cause due to my job. i have to do alot cardio !! sad case !!

  4. #4
    Doom44's Avatar
    Doom44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    582
    Anyone?

  5. #5
    Armykid93's Avatar
    Armykid93 is offline Productive Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Where they take my ass
    Posts
    3,686
    Quote Originally Posted by Doom44 View Post

    how about before cardio? cause due to my job. i have to do alot cardio !! sad case !!
    just curious what do you do?

  6. #6
    Doom44's Avatar
    Doom44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    582
    Quote Originally Posted by Armykid93

    just curious what do you do?
    Group instructor. That's the reason why I have to do alots of cardio. You know lesmills??
    So I should take bcaa before class for anti catobolic?

  7. #7
    Ashop's Avatar
    Ashop is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,943
    Quote Originally Posted by Doom44 View Post
    What's the best anti-catabolic supplement? BCAAs ?
    BCAA's can help sure.

  8. #8
    Times Roman's Avatar
    Times Roman is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Back from Afghanistan
    Posts
    27,383
    an interesting read on the subject:
    Catabolism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Catabolism (Greek kata = downward + ballein = to throw) is the set of metabolic pathways that breaks down molecules into smaller units to release energy[1] and is related to wakefulness. In catabolism, large molecules such as polysaccharides, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins are broken down into smaller units such as monosaccharides, fatty acids, nucleotides, and amino acids, respectively. As molecules such as polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids are made from long chains of these small monomer units (mono = one + mer = part), the large molecules are called polymers (poly = many).

    Cells use the monomers released from breaking down polymers to either construct new polymer molecules, or degrade the monomers further to simple waste products, releasing energy. Cellular wastes include lactic acid, acetic acid, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and urea. The creation of these wastes is usually an oxidation process involving a release of chemical free energy, some of which is lost as heat, but the rest of which is used to drive the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This molecule acts as a way for the cell to transfer the energy released by catabolism to the energy-requiring reactions that make up anabolism. Catabolism therefore provides the chemical energy necessary for the maintenance and growth of cells. Examples of catabolic processes include glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, the breakdown of muscle protein in order to use amino acids as substrates for gluconeogenesis and breakdown of fat in adipose tissue to fatty acids.

    There are many signals that control catabolism. Most of the known signals are hormones and the molecules involved in metabolism itself. Endocrinologists have traditionally classified many of the hormones as anabolic or catabolic, depending on which part of metabolism they stimulate. The so-called classic catabolic hormones known since the early 20th century are cortisol, glucagon, and adrenaline (and other catecholamines). In recent decades, many more hormones with at least some catabolic effects have been discovered, including cytokines, orexin (also known as hypocretin), and melatonin.[citation needed]

    Many of these catabolic hormones express an anti-catabolic effect in muscle tissue. One study found that the administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) had an anti-proteolytic effect, and in fact suppressed catabolism rather than promoted it.[2] Another study found that catecholamines in general (i.e. noradrenaline/norepinephrine and adrenaline/epinephrine) greatly decreased the rate of muscle catabolism.[3]

  9. #9
    Bonaparte's Avatar
    Bonaparte is offline AR-Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    13,504
    BCAAs and EAAs, for sure.
    Carbs too, but they'll promote fat storage.

  10. #10
    Doom44's Avatar
    Doom44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    582
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonaparte
    BCAAs and EAAs, for sure.
    Carbs too, but they'll promote fat storage.
    Thanks for the answer I think I will stick to BCAAs .

  11. #11
    Doom44's Avatar
    Doom44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    582
    Quote Originally Posted by Times Roman
    an interesting read on the subject:
    Catabolism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Catabolism (Greek kata = downward + ballein = to throw) is the set of metabolic pathways that breaks down molecules into smaller units to release energy[1] and is related to wakefulness. In catabolism, large molecules such as polysaccharides, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins are broken down into smaller units such as monosaccharides, fatty acids, nucleotides, and amino acids, respectively. As molecules such as polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids are made from long chains of these small monomer units (mono = one + mer = part), the large molecules are called polymers (poly = many).

    Cells use the monomers released from breaking down polymers to either construct new polymer molecules, or degrade the monomers further to simple waste products, releasing energy. Cellular wastes include lactic acid, acetic acid, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and urea. The creation of these wastes is usually an oxidation process involving a release of chemical free energy, some of which is lost as heat, but the rest of which is used to drive the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This molecule acts as a way for the cell to transfer the energy released by catabolism to the energy-requiring reactions that make up anabolism. Catabolism therefore provides the chemical energy necessary for the maintenance and growth of cells. Examples of catabolic processes include glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, the breakdown of muscle protein in order to use amino acids as substrates for gluconeogenesis and breakdown of fat in adipose tissue to fatty acids.

    There are many signals that control catabolism. Most of the known signals are hormones and the molecules involved in metabolism itself. Endocrinologists have traditionally classified many of the hormones as anabolic or catabolic, depending on which part of metabolism they stimulate. The so-called classic catabolic hormones known since the early 20th century are cortisol, glucagon, and adrenaline (and other catecholamines). In recent decades, many more hormones with at least some catabolic effects have been discovered, including cytokines, orexin (also known as hypocretin), and melatonin.[citation needed]

    Many of these catabolic hormones express an anti-catabolic effect in muscle tissue. One study found that the administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) had an anti-proteolytic effect, and in fact suppressed catabolism rather than promoted it.[2] Another study found that catecholamines in general (i.e. noradrenaline/norepinephrine and adrenaline/epinephrine) greatly decreased the rate of muscle catabolism.[3]
    Epinephrine? Omg

  12. #12
    tigerspawn's Avatar
    tigerspawn is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,976
    Quote Originally Posted by Times Roman View Post
    an interesting read on the subject:
    Catabolism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Catabolism (Greek kata = downward + ballein = to throw) is the set of metabolic pathways that breaks down molecules into smaller units to release energy[1] and is related to wakefulness. In catabolism, large molecules such as polysaccharides, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins are broken down into smaller units such as monosaccharides, fatty acids, nucleotides, and amino acids, respectively. As molecules such as polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids are made from long chains of these small monomer units (mono = one + mer = part), the large molecules are called polymers (poly = many).

    Cells use the monomers released from breaking down polymers to either construct new polymer molecules, or degrade the monomers further to simple waste products, releasing energy. Cellular wastes include lactic acid, acetic acid, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and urea. The creation of these wastes is usually an oxidation process involving a release of chemical free energy, some of which is lost as heat, but the rest of which is used to drive the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This molecule acts as a way for the cell to transfer the energy released by catabolism to the energy-requiring reactions that make up anabolism. Catabolism therefore provides the chemical energy necessary for the maintenance and growth of cells. Examples of catabolic processes include glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, the breakdown of muscle protein in order to use amino acids as substrates for gluconeogenesis and breakdown of fat in adipose tissue to fatty acids.

    There are many signals that control catabolism. Most of the known signals are hormones and the molecules involved in metabolism itself. Endocrinologists have traditionally classified many of the hormones as anabolic or catabolic, depending on which part of metabolism they stimulate. The so-called classic catabolic hormones known since the early 20th century are cortisol, glucagon, and adrenaline (and other catecholamines). In recent decades, many more hormones with at least some catabolic effects have been discovered, including cytokines, orexin (also known as hypocretin), and melatonin.[citation needed]

    Many of these catabolic hormones express an anti-catabolic effect in muscle tissue. One study found that the administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) had an anti-proteolytic effect, and in fact suppressed catabolism rather than promoted it.[2] Another study found that catecholamines in general (i.e. noradrenaline/norepinephrine and adrenaline/epinephrine) greatly decreased the rate of muscle catabolism.[3]
    Thanks for the post Times. Great read.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •