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  1. #1
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Avoid High GI Foods...

    Posted by Under_construct @ MuscleNexus...

    The underlined foods are High GI and should be avoided:
    Note: Exception of PWO, and sometimes Pre-WO...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Avoid High GI Foods...-table01.gif   Avoid High GI Foods...-table02.gif  
    Last edited by Blown_SC; 09-26-2004 at 03:27 PM.

  2. #2
    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    WHAT???

    Not only is there nothing there, high gi foods serve a valuable purpose in many dietary approaches.


    ~SC~

  3. #3
    RoNNy THe BuLL's Avatar
    RoNNy THe BuLL is offline Anabolic Member
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    They do serve a purpose post-workout and possibly pre, but I don't think there's too many added benefits of High-GI Carbs.

    BUMP, I want to see the list.

  4. #4
    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    Right, pwo in many forms, maybe pre-w.o., but that's only in bodybuilding regards. Many endurance athletes, professional athletes, cyclists, runners, etc., all utilize this type of fuel, so it's all dependent upon the person/activity/goals.

    ~SC~

  5. #5
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwoleCat
    Right, pwo in many forms, maybe pre-w.o., but that's only in bodybuilding regards. Many endurance athletes, professional athletes, cyclists, runners, etc., all utilize this type of fuel, so it's all dependent upon the person/activity/goals.

    ~SC~
    There, I fixed the links....it's just a general list, that I found useful... I guess they didn't show unless you were a member of the other board.. my bad...
    Care to explain why/when you use them?
    I'm here to learn... perhaps a link to save you time?

    Here's what I have found:

    "Run By the Numbers
    All of the popular weight-loss plans that recognize the difference between low GI and high GI carbohydrates strongly recommend eating low GI foods to maintain your weight and health. But things aren't that easy for runners, who need to include a mix of both high and low GI foods in prerun and postrun meals in order to get maximum performance benefits. That's because high GI foods can help boost speed and aid in recovery, while low GI foods extend endurance. So here's what to eat, when:

    Before You Run: Go low here. Studies have shown that eating low GI foods about 2 hours before a workout help maintain steady blood-sugar levels during exercise compared with high GI foods. Therefore, you're able to run longer.

    In one study, cyclists were given either a high or a low GI meal a few hours before a hard ride lasting 2 hours. The cyclists were then instructed to pedal all out for as long as they could. Cyclists pedaled almost 60 percent longer after the low GI preexercise meal versus the high GI, and they also maintained higher blood-sugar levels. The researchers attribute this to the slow and steady release of carbohydrates from the low GI meal.

    Fruit, old-fashioned oatmeal, and low-fat yogurt are great low GI foods to eat about 2 hours before you run to help sustain you for the long haul. But if you find yourself fueling up just minutes before you hit the road, reach for a higher GI energy bar or sports drink so that the carbs will get into your system faster.

    While You Run: Time to get high. Eating high GI foods and beverages during exercise helps boost performance. The quickly digested carbohydrates in sports drinks, gels, and energy bars (most bars have moderate to high GIs) offer an immediate source of sugar for your hard-working muscles. The quick-release carbohydrates also keep you feeling alert, as your brain thrives on sugar for fuel.

    After You Run: High GI foods are essential when you're trying to restock your glycogen stores. A study with cyclists demonstrated that eating high GI foods following an exhausting session boosted glycogen stores almost twice as much as equal amounts of low GI foods. So after your runs, fuel up with high GI foods such as potatoes, cereals, or waffles.

    Reasons to Go Low

    Of course, there are another 23 or so hours in the day when you're not running or recovering from a run. During that time, should you reach for low or high GI foods? Research suggests that eating mostly low GI foods is the best way to maintain your health and weight. Here's why: When you eat a high GI food, your blood-sugar levels soar. Your insulin levels then surge in response as your body works to send the sugar to your muscles. While this sugar-insulin dance is okay on occasion, repeated spikes take their toll on your health. Countless research studies link a predominantly high GI diet to obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

    Low GI foods, with their slow and steady release of sugar into your system, don't cause such blood sugar and insulin spikes. Consequently, a diet with mostly low GI foods offers numerous health benefits, including the following:
    Weight control: Eating a diet of primarily low GI foods may help curb your appetite and fend off weight gain. Ever feel hungry after eating a breakfast of cereal and toast (high GI foods), yet remain satisfied the whole morning after having a bowl of old-fashioned oatmeal and nuts (low GI foods)? That's because shortly after a high GI food sends your blood-sugar levels soaring, you may actually experience a sharp drop in blood sugar as your insulin levels surge to metabolize the sugar. The resulting blood-sugar drop then sets off hunger signals. Following a low GI meal, however, you don't experience these spikes and drops in blood sugar. The result: You feel more satisfied for longer, and eat less at the next meal.

    Diabetes: Most of the 17 million Americans with diabetes have Type-2 diabetes, which is characterized by high blood-sugar and insulin levels. Millions more (both adults and teens) have insulin resistance, a condition just shy of diabetes. Studies show that people who eat a mostly low GI diet have a 25 percent lower risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, because they experience fewer spikes in blood-sugar and insulin levels.

    Heart disease: Eating low GI foods may also fend off the nation's No. 1 killer, as studies show that high GI diets result in elevated triglyceride levels (a type of blood fat), lower levels of good-guy HDL cholesterol, and increased blood pressure--all of which boost heart disease risk. At the same time, low GI diets appear to have beneficial effects on all three of these factors.

    Cancer: Eating low GI foods regularly may even protect against cancer. Various cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast cancer appear to be related to growth factors stemming from high levels of insulin. In a recent Italian study, high GI foods increased colon-cancer risk. The researchers speculate that repeated spikes in insulin levels caused by high GI foods may fuel the growth of colon-cancer cells and, perhaps, other types of cancer cells.

    The Lowdown: For weight management and overall health, eat mostly low GI foods. But during and after exercise, when you can't wait for that "sugar boost," go ahead and reach for high GI foods."
    http://www.runnersworld.com/article/...0-6042,00.html
    Last edited by Blown_SC; 09-25-2004 at 09:54 PM. Reason: spelling...

  6. #6
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    So, you would suggest them PWO to replenish glycogen levels?
    Other than that, when else?
    Last edited by Blown_SC; 09-25-2004 at 09:54 PM.

  7. #7
    slizzut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blown_SC
    So, you would suggest them PWO to replenish glycogen levels?
    Other than that, when else?
    Some may use pre-workout. But high-gi carbs are a must PWO/PPWO.

  8. #8
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by slizzut
    Some may use pre-workout. But high-gi carbs are a must PWO/PPWO.
    I agree with that, I suppose I should have clarified more in my original post, but I thought PWO went without saying, since most of us know the 2:1...

    Could you explain why pre WO though?

  9. #9
    eggplant's Avatar
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    in bodybuilding aspects...i do not see the need for hi GI carbs pre workout..pwo and ppwo are a must anyway..as most of us already know..hi Gi carbs raises ones blood sugar rapidly..which gives one a boost in energy..but, that is just temporarily....soon after..one would experience a crash in blood sugar..resulting in a sluggish dizzy kind of feeling. and that's definitely not what we want to be feeling in the middle of a grueling workout..but as for pre workout..i believe those who incoporate hi GI carbs are looking for an immediate boost in energy..? but IMHO i do not use this principle..if i were to have some kind of carbs pre workout..i would opt for a slower burning one like oats...my2cents

  10. #10
    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blown_SC
    So, you would suggest them PWO to replenish glycogen levels?
    Other than that, when else?
    Got back to your pm bro.
    ~SC~

  11. #11
    anabolicwannabe is offline Associate Member
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    anyone knows what's the GI for oat/oatmeal? i'm not sure where i read it, but what i read was oat was a good carbohydrate throughout the day (not PWO) as it had a low GI. but up in that list, it stated 55. which is quite close to 60. (60-100 being high in GI)
    Last edited by anabolicwannabe; 09-26-2004 at 10:17 AM.

  12. #12
    Rhino58's Avatar
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    I guess i could avoid all of that except beer. A line has to be drawn somewhere.

  13. #13
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by anabolicwannabe
    anyone knows what's the GI for oat/oatmeal? i'm not sure where i read it, but what i read was oat was a good carbohydrate throughout the day (not PWO) as it had a low GI. but up in that list, it stated 55. which is quite close to 60. (60-100 being high in GI)
    One-minute Quaker oats, which I use, are rated at 65-66 on GI...
    Some forms of porridge are below 50... not all the same...

  14. #14
    carbs-rule is offline Associate Member
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    The "high" and "medium" labels for GI are pretty much arbitrary labels. A food with a GI of 59 isn't consider high, but one more point and it is labeled high. The continuous measure is better, so I don't think there is a huge difference between 55 and 60. I would eat it as a slow burner in my diet even if it was up in the 65-70 range. I would also imagine that eating it with other slow proteins might make the whole mixture in your stomach take even longer to burn through. That stuff is incredibly good for you anyway. Whenever I take a dump, I sigh in relief and say to myself, "Ah...oatmeal."

  15. #15
    anabolicwannabe is offline Associate Member
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    so oatmeal is still a good source of carb, right?

  16. #16
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
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    Quote Originally Posted by anabolicwannabe
    so oatmeal is still a good source of carb, right?
    Of course bro, I eat it every morning... and am right now actually...

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