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  1. #1
    insanepump621 is offline Member
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    is there a point to buying amino acids and a protein already containing amino acids?

    I am recently purchasing 5 pounds of whey protein by optimum nutrition which has amino acids already in it... Then I was into purchasing twinlabs amino acids 1000mg a tablet of amino acids.. Is it worth it considering my protein already has it in?

  2. #2
    nathanlgd's Avatar
    nathanlgd is offline Associate Member
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    The capsules hit you much more quickly so after a workout you pop the capsules and they hit you quicker than protein which has to break down into amino before its any use - or something like that anyway. Someone will explain it properly.

  3. #3
    juicyr6's Avatar
    juicyr6 is offline Junior Member
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    i see what nathan is talking about...but will the difference be worth the money?

  4. #4
    insanepump621 is offline Member
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    exactley.. granted in the protein the amino acid isnt the main ingredient... but still is it worth the extra money that id rather save for next cycle lol

  5. #5
    Bryan2's Avatar
    Bryan2 is offline Supplement Guru
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    PROTEIN ARE AMINO ACIDS!!!

    they are the same thing bro there is no need to buy the amino acid pills unless you are planning on taking them every 15mins as you work out which you wont notice much bro.


    just do some research on PWO nutrition bro and youll be set

  6. #6
    Suareezay2 is offline New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by insanepump621
    I am recently purchasing 5 pounds of whey protein by optimum nutrition which has amino acids already in it...
    Protein is made up of amino acids. Every protein has amino acids at some level.

    BCAAs (branched chain amino acids) which are leucine, isoleucine, and valine, are important because they are essential amino acids, which means the body cant produce them on its own whereas the other non-essential amino acids can be produced by your body. These 3 amino acids comprise 1/3 of the protein within muscles, and therefore are extremely important in muscle building and muscle retention. Another key factor of BCAA’s is the way they are metabolized. Rather than metabolizing in the liver, they are processed and metabolized in the muscle tissue.

  7. #7
    prolangtum's Avatar
    prolangtum is offline Supplement Guru
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    but...the results will be minimal...just take your protein.

  8. #8
    Suareezay2 is offline New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by prolangtum
    but...the results will be minimal...just take your protein.
    I wouldnt even call the advantages "results"...taking BCAAs more or less ensures that your gaining and preserving as much muscle as your training and the rest of your diet will allow....they arent going to balloon you up or cause creatine-like responses.

    They are more of a "cherry on top" supplement, no a "meat an potatos" supplement.

  9. #9
    Positive is offline Associate Member
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    What do you guys think of Mass Aminos or Muscle Mass by Beverly International?

    I currently take Mass Aminos before and after my workout.

  10. #10
    co2boi's Avatar
    co2boi is offline Anabolic Member
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    Proteins are comprised of Amino Acids. In other words, amino acids are broken down proteins. There are incomplete proteins, but you body maintains a pool of amino acids at all times. The only real reason to supplement with them is if you are vegan.

  11. #11
    prolangtum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suareezay2
    taking BCAAs more or less ensures that your gaining and preserving as much muscle as your training and the rest of your diet will allow]
    you have been reading too many supplement ads.

  12. #12
    prolangtum's Avatar
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    Taken from *************, who actually sells BCAAs in bulk:

    Are BCAA supplements necessary?

    Given the information above, there is significant evidence indicating various benefits of BCAA ingestion for athletes. However, the pertitent issue then becomes whether or not BCAA supplements have any advantage over ingestion of protein and/or carbohydrates, which are both significantly less expensive.

    The first issue is whether or not BCAA's are superior to protein in stimulating protein synthesis. One study indicates that there is a decline in plasma leucine over five weeks of training in speed and strength athletes consuming 1.26 g protein per kg bodyweight daily, and that leucine supplementation prevents this decrease [4]. However, this study is only confirming a well known fact, which is that strength athletes need high amounts of dietary protein. Studies indicate that in bodybuilders and strength trainers, the amount of dietary protein needed to maximally stimulate protein synthesis is in the realm of 1.4-1.8 g/kg bodyweight (about .6-.7 g/lb), and also that most of these athletes consume well above this amount [31]. For example, a study in stength athletes compared daily dietary protein intakes of .86 g/kg, 1.40 g/kg, and 2.40 g/kg, and found that whole body protein synthesis was increased in the 1.40 g/kg group compared to the lower group, but not further increased in the 2.40 g/kg group. However, rates of leucine oxidation were much higher in the high protein group [32]. This means that if protein intake is adequate, it is doubtful that BCAA supplementation could further stimulate protein synthesis, as the extra amino acids will just be readily catabolized.

    Perhaps even more enlightening is the work of Tipton et al., who conducted studies on the types and quantities of amino acids that increase protein synthesis in humans during and after exercise [33]. They compared 40 grams of mixed amino acids to 40 grams of essential amino acids (containing a much higher quantity of BCAA's) to compare their effectiveness in stimulating protein synthesis postexercise, and the two supplements provided a equivalent increases in protein synthesis. The authors then concluded that "there is a maximum rate of net synthesis attainable during hyperaminoacidemia after exercise," and that 40 grams of mixed amino acids is enough to maximally stimulate protein synthesis postexercise.

    Another issue is that BCAA supplements are in the form of free-form amino acids, as opposed to a whole protein source. Supplement companies often claim that free-form amino acids are absorbed in greater quantity, more effectively, and more quickly, but this is contrary to the scientific evidence. In general, studies indicate that protein hydrolysates are utilized most effectively, followed by whole proteins, followed by free form amino acids. Intestinal transporters exist for both peptides and free amino acids, and peptides are absorbed more rapidly [34]. Peptides that are not absorbed via a transporter can be rapidly broken down enzymatically. Although not the best model for human athletes, studies in food-deprived rats being refed consistently find that whey protein hydrolysate leads to much higher degrees of weight gain and nitrogen retention than free form amino acids, with one study indicating that whole protein is in the middle in terms of effectiveness [35-36]. Comparative studies have also been done in humans. In healthy subjects, whole protein, protein hydrolysate, and free amino acids all resulted in similar nitrogen balance [37]. Another study in healthy humans found that a protein hydrolysate was absorbed equally as rapidly as free form aminos [38]. Ideally, a study more specific to the conditions in question would be available, but this research indicates that fast-digesting proteins could be just as or more effective than free form amino acids for use before or during exercise.

    Carbohydrates may also provide many of the benefits of BCAA supplementation at a much lower cost. As mentioned above, two studies found that BCAA's and carbohydrates together did not provide a performance advantage over carbohydrates alone. Carbohydrates will obviously have glycogen sparing and glucose increasing properties as BCAA's do. Also, carbohydrate supplementation prevents the increase in tryptophan levels caused by exercise, although they may not be as effective as BCAA's [20]. Finally, carbohydrates also have glutamine-sparing and positive immune effects in athletes [39].

    All in all, it would appear that the positive effects of BCAA's on protein synthesis can be achieved by a high protein diet and use of a fast-acting protein prior to and after exercise, and that most of the other possible benefits on exercise performance could be achieved equally as effectively by ingesting simple carbohydrates prior to exercise.

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