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  1. #1
    Big_BoneZ's Avatar
    Big_BoneZ is offline Associate Member
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    Exclamation Small bubble in the needle

    heres whats bothering me..


    Me and my buddy were doing a fina shot [1 ml] each and in both the needles we saw a small bubble right at plastic part at end of the needle,

    we tried to take that bubble out, but no matter what u do, it go away.
    if you pushed on the plunger, it would go away, after loosing a drop of gear and when u release pressure on the plunger, the bubble comes back again.

    this is what we did to get rid of the bubble [ i know a small bubble wont hurt, but its always good to be safe than sorry]

    we pushed on the plunger while injecting, slightly, so the bubble is out and then injected.

    now the question is..... IS the bubble supposed to be there?

    my thinking was there should be no air in the injection while you shoot... this was very confusing for us.

  2. #2
    ripped4fsu's Avatar
    ripped4fsu is offline Anabolic Member
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    I inject those little bubbles all the time, they usually occur when I draw the oil too fast. they won't hurt you, where air bubbles are an issue is when you are injecting something directly into a vein. air bubbles in the blood stream are a big no-no! but if they were a problem in muscle tissue I'd be long dead

  3. #3
    KeyMastur is offline VET
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    You can also try heating everything up by running your filled syringe underneath hot tap water for a little bit. Sometimes that'll help to "free" the bubble to the needle area because everything moves a little quicker.

  4. #4
    halifaxsteve is offline Member
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    i shoot the little bubbles all the time, but they only come when i draw too quickly.

    i run the vial under hot water for a sec to warm it up before i draw, makes it run better. also, if you have an 18g to draw, you'll get fewer bubbles

  5. #5
    Bigun's Avatar
    Bigun is offline Senior Member
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    I also inject those little bubbles. I think once you have released the pressure off yout thumb, the plunger always comes a little back no matter what even when you are 100% careful.

    Aspirate every time and as long as theres no blood you should have nothing to worry about.

  6. #6
    gundam675's Avatar
    gundam675 is offline Senior Member
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    it would take 3cc - 4 cc of air to hard u i think ! dont worry about the bubbles !

  7. #7
    goldenear is offline Associate Member
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    more like 200-300 cc's of air directly in a vein to kill you. This came directly from a forensics coroner who specializes in investigative homocide.

    I inject about 1/4cc of air everytime I do an IM injection. It's called the air-lock method and it's a universally accepted medical practice. Just run a search and you'll find everything you need to know.

  8. #8
    Big_BoneZ's Avatar
    Big_BoneZ is offline Associate Member
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    right on guys.... yes I did see that plunger doesnt go all the way in when i finished injecting... and I am still ALIVE.. lol

    thanks guys

  9. #9
    halifaxsteve is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenear
    more like 200-300 cc's of air directly in a vein to kill you. This came directly from a forensics coroner who specializes in investigative homocide.

    I inject about 1/4cc of air everytime I do an IM injection. It's called the air-lock method and it's a universally accepted medical practice. Just run a search and you'll find everything you need to know.
    i would prefer z-track over airlock...

  10. #10
    goldenear is offline Associate Member
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    I've used both, and it seems that there is less tissue trauma (i.e., discomfort) with the airlock method. Z-track may be more advantageous, however, with large injection volumes (>3cc's).

  11. #11
    Pinch's Avatar
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    FYI i think those bubbles you are talking about, IS NOT AIR

    its pressure bubbles

    because when you pull back on the plunger the bubbles get bigger and when you release pressure they get really small

  12. #12
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    If an air bubble enters the blood stream it is treated as an infection by your body. This causes a build up of blood cells to combat the infection, only there is no infection so the blood cells keep coming. Often times, even after the air bubble has dissapated the clot of blood cells is still there. This is what happens when divers get decompression sickness or, the "bends". In diving, when treated quickly the air bubble shrinks and absorbs into the body. If not treated quickly enough it can lead to permanent damage. I.E. paralysis, brain damage, numbness in extremeties.

    Bottom line: Aspirate and DO NOT inject air into a vein(not that anyone would do that on purpose). Even at a low amount it is a bad idea.

    -B

  13. #13
    halifaxsteve is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by twosocks40
    If an air bubble enters the blood stream it is treated as an infection by your body. This causes a build up of blood cells to combat the infection, only there is no infection so the blood cells keep coming. Often times, even after the air bubble has dissapated the clot of blood cells is still there. This is what happens when divers get decompression sickness or, the "bends". In diving, when treated quickly the air bubble shrinks and absorbs into the body. If not treated quickly enough it can lead to permanent damage. I.E. paralysis, brain damage, numbness in extremeties.

    Bottom line: Aspirate and DO NOT inject air into a vein(not that anyone would do that on purpose). Even at a low amount it is a bad idea.

    -B
    this is precisely why i would never recommend airlock to anyone, esp a newbie, or anyone who neglects to aspirate. if there is leakage, z-track.

  14. #14
    Dima is offline New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by gundam675
    it would take 3cc - 4 cc of air to hard u i think ! dont worry about the bubbles !

    Actually only 1cc is deadly if you hit a vein...but you don't have to worry about those little bubbles

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