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Thread: lumbar spine rehab

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    lumbar spine rehab

    back pain is a serious subject. As you recover from a back injury, it is important that you begin to learn how to safely strengthen your back to help prevent injuries to your back later. Your therapist can teach you specific exercises that will help reduce your back pain now - and help you begin a new set of habits that will help keep your back healthy.

    This article will help you understand what each part of your rehabilitation program is meant to do. It will also teach you how your back works and how to reduce or prevent further injury while your back heals.


    First, you will learn why it is important for your spine to be properly balanced - in the Neutral Spine Position.
    Then you will see how to use the neutral spine position in everyday activities - such as walking and lifting. Learning to lift properly is so important that a whole section has been devoted to the rules of lifting.
    Finally, you will learn how you can benefit from exercise, after an injury and as protection against further injury.
    Understanding the Neutral Spine Position

    Management and prevention of back pain begin by understanding the neutral spine position. Three natural curves are present in a healthy spine. The neck, or the cervical spine, curves slightly inward. The mid back, or the thoracic spine, is curved outward. The low back, or the lumbar spine, curves inward again. The neutral alignment is important in helping to cushion the spine from too much stress and strain. Learning how to maintain a neutral spine position also helps you move safely during activities like sitting, walking, and lifting.

    The natural curves of the spine are the result of the muscles, ligaments, and tendons that attach to the vertebrae of the spine. Without these supporting structures, the spine would collapse. They support the spine - much like guide wires support the mast of a ship. This guide wire system is made up mainly of the a**ominal and back muscles. The a**ominal muscles provide support by attaching to the ribs, pelvis, and indirectly to the lumbar spine. The muscles of the back are arranged in layers, with each layer playing an important role in balancing the spine. By using these muscles together, it is possible to change the curves of the spine.

    Controlling pelvic tilt is one way to begin helping to balance the spine. As certain muscles of the back and a**omen contract, the pelvis rotates. As the pelvis rotates forward, the lumbar curve increases. As the pelvis rotates backward, the curve of the low back straightens. Rotation of the pelvis is like a wheel centered at the hip joint. The muscles of the upper thighs also attach to the pelvis and contraction of these muscles can be used to change the curve of the spine.

    The a**ominal muscles work alone, or with the hamstring muscles to produce a backward rotation of the pelvis. This causes the slight inward curve of the low back to straighten. If these muscles cause the curve of the low back to straighten too much, this may produce an unhealthy slouching posture.

    In the other direction, as the hip flexors contract and back extensors contract, the pelvis is rotated forward - increasing the curvature of the lower back. If this curve is increased too much, another unhealthy posture may result. This condition is called lordosis in medical terminology, or swayback in common terms.

    A balance of strength and flexibility is the key to maintaining the neutral spine position. This balance is the basis for optimal muscle function. Like a car, an imbalance may lead to wear and tear, eventually damaging the various parts of the car.

    Muscle imbalances that affect the spine have many causes. One common cause of muscle imbalance is weak a**ominal muscles. As the a**ominal muscles sag, the hip flexors become tight, causing an increase in the curve of the low back. This leads to the swayback posture mentioned above. Another common problem results from tight hamstrings. As the hamstring muscles become tight, the pelvis is rotated backwards. This produces an abnormal slouching posture.

    Putting Safe Posture into Practice

    Understanding body mechanics means understanding how we use our body. Proper body mechanics result when we put the neutral spine posture into action. To use proper body mechanics we need to learn how the spine should work during activities like: rising from a chair, walking, and lifting.

    Sitting

    Healthy sitting posture is based on the neutral spine position. Positioning your hips and knees at 90 degrees can help you keep a neutral sitting posture. Remember this position is balanced between the extremes of lumbar movement. Remember to choose a properly designed chair to help support the lumbar spine. The neutral spine position is also important when getting up from a chair. Holding the spine safely in neutral, the pelvic wheel turns forward, placing the "nose over the toes". With the feet placed shoulder width apart, stand upright. Use the buttock and thigh muscles to push yourself up. Do not twist or bend too far over at the waist and put too much strain on the lumbar spine.

    Walking

    Proper body mechanics are also important while walking - try to maintain the neutral spine position while walking. In the neutral position, the legs and arms swing naturally during forward motion. Conditions that alter the normal way of walking, and cause a limp, can severely stress the spine. While walking, always try to maintain your spine in the neutral position.

    Lifting

    Lifting is one of the most dangerous activities for the spine. The neutral position MUST be used to reduce the risk of injury. With the spine held in the neutral position, the movement occurs as the pelvic wheel turns. The hip is the axis of pelvic rotation - not the back! Notice how the back loses the neutral position when the pelvis does not rotate forward. This posture focuses the force on the back muscles during a lift. Lifting in a neutral position allows the larger and more powerful leg muscles to do the lifting.

    When lifting - first find the neutral position. Bend at the hips by rotating the pelvic wheel at the hip joint axis. Keep the safe posture, hold the object securely, and use the large leg muscles to generate power. Tighten the a**ominal muscles during the lift to create a stabilizing corset around the trunk.

    The Rules of Lifting

    Many back injuries occur during lifting. Making a complete checklist for safe lifting can reduce the risks of injury.


    First, plan and prepare for the lift. It only takes a moment to insure safety. The consequences of a back injury can be long lasting!
    Insure a safe and clear path.
    Before beginning, think through the lift.
    Obtain good footing with a wide base of support, by placing the feet a minimum of shoulder width apart. This lowers the center of gravity and increases stability.
    Keep the load close! Keeping the load close to the body can reduce stress on the spine and back muscles. Think of how a lever and fulcrum works. The back muscles, the spine, and the arms are the parts that form this lever system. The force needed to lift an object is lower if the load is nearer the fulcrum point. If the load is too far away from the body, the muscles of the spine have to work harder to help with the lift. This leads to too much stress on the muscles of the spine, and can cause injury.
    Maintain the neutral spine position! By moving the pelvic wheel around its axis, the upper body hinges forward, but the spine stays in neutral. Remember the neutral spine position at all times!
    Remember to lift with the large muscles of the legs!
    Avoid twisting AND bending of the lower back at the same time! This is one the most damaging movements to the spine. To avoid twisting, pivot the feet to complete the lift.
    Get help if necessary! If the load is too bulky or heavy, do not hesitate to get help or use a hand truck! Do not be too tough or too busy to get help. Will power does not take the place of a reasonably safe lift.
    The Importance of Exercise

    Exercise is beneficial during all stages of recovery from a back injury.

    Different types of exercises will be used by your physical therapist as you progress. In the early stages, when your back is still quite painful, specific exercises to reduce your pain may be suggested. These exercises are helpful in easing pain through relaxation. Positioning exercises place the spine at rest. These exercises can give relief to sore muscles and joints.

    Back pain can be physically and emotionally draining. Relaxation exercises may not correct your problem, but they can help control pain and its accompanying stress. Movement is also important, even when the back is still painful. Careful movements suggested by your therapist can safely ease pain by providing nutrition and lubrication to injured areas. Movement of joints and muscles also signals the nervous system to block incoming pain.

    As your back becomes less painful, the exercises will be changed to focus on improving the overall health of your back. These changes will focus on:


    Flexibility
    Strength
    Posture
    Coordination
    Aerobic Conditioning
    Flexibility

    Exercises that increase flexibility reduce pain, making it easier to keep the spine in the neutral position. Tight muscles cause imbalances in spinal movements. This can make injury of these structures more likely. Flexibility exercises for the trunk and lower limbs are helpful in establishing safe movement. A slow progression of stretching exercises can increase flexibility in these structures and reduce the chance of re-injury.

    Strength

    The next stage of exercise focuses on the strength of the muscles that support the spine. These muscles help bring the spine into the neutral position and keep it there. Trained a**ominal, back, and hip muscles assist in forming a natural corset. Strength training is simple to do at home and does not require any expensive equipment. Posture

    Posture exercises help train movement between the pelvis and low back.

    Learning how to find and hold the neutral position of the spine is the basis for safe and healthy posture. Remember that the position of the pelvis determines the curve in the low back. Forward rotation increases the curve.

    Backward rotation straightens the curve. By practicing these exercises, you will become comfortable using the neutral spine position in daily activities.

    Coordination

    Strong muscles need to be coordinated. As the strength of the spinal muscles increases, it becomes important to train those muscles to work together.

    Learning any physical activity takes practice. Muscles must be trained so that the physical activity is under control. Muscles trained to control safe movement of the spine reduce the chance of injury. You will be taught exercises that will help you train your back muscles to work together to protect the spine.

    Aerobic Conditioning

    Finally, attention will be directed to increasing your overall fitness. The word "aerobic" means "with oxygen". By using oxygen as they work, muscles are better able to move continuously, rather than in spurts. Fitness training allows the muscles to become more efficient at obtaining nutrients and oxygen from the blood. As the muscles use up the nutrients and oxygen, chemical waste products are created that cause pain. Training also increases the muscles ability to get rid of these waste products.

    Exercise has other benefits as well. Exercise causes chemicals called endorphins to be released into the blood. These chemical hormones act as natural pain relievers. It will be important for you to pick an aerobic activity that you enjoy and stick with it.

  2. #2
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    OK, I read this. Lot's of questions. I pm'd you.

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    also read the posts on cryotherapy and heat

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    ^ Yet another reason why NOT to do full range squats or deadlifts. It's completely UNnecessary for bodybuilding purposes. Pl'ing of an necessary evil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pneumatic
    ^ Yet another reason why NOT to do full range squats or deadlifts. It's completely UNnecessary for bodybuilding purposes. Pl'ing of an necessary evil.
    i dont completely agree with that, i believe it is better to lighten up the weight and do the full rom in any exercise for best results

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    I think I'll just stop going to heavy and just work with volume. 4-5 sets with 12-8 reps.

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    Here's even more proof >

    This isn't really breaking news because it was reported back in August of 2004 in the Journal of Strength Conditioning Research. I ran into it a couple of days ago and thought you'd be interested.

    The article:

    An Analysis of full range of motion vs. partial range of motion training in the deveopment of strength in untrained men.

    It describes a study done over a 10 week period at the University of Southern Mississippi on 46 untrained men.

    Guess what they found. Partial range exercises produced as high a strength gain in the full range bench press as full range exercises did.

    Now in the study there is no indication that anyone was using anywhere near the kind of resistances we normally use so the best they did was to exactly match the results of full range. The exercise was the bench press).

    But when you consider all the years people have said that full range was absolutely required it really makes me wonder why this wasn't big news on the cover of every fitness magazine when it broke. I just happened to be browsing around when I hit upon it.

    Here's why this is major news.

    In 1991 Pete Sisco along with John Little wrote and sold thousands of copies of their research findings concerning their discovery that full range of motion was not required to produce strength gains.

    That was really just the first step along a thousand mile journey leading up to today, but that first step was really picked on by experts from corners everwhere who said, "You have to have full range of motion, you have to have full range of motion" and more of that type of phrase over and over again.

    I want to applaud them for taking that first step.

    I'm not sure what there motivation was for doing it, I know I didn't have any input.

    But what I really like is that finally they are getting started on realizing that full range isn't required. Once they've taken that step it finally opens the door up to the next 20 discoveries that take us from where Power Factor training was in 1991 to where we are today.

    So this is good news for those of you who have to answer to people who continually tell you that partial range can't work. Just let them know they haven't kept up with the latest university studies.

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    DOC sust any advice for pain in the disc between the shoulder blades

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    Quote Originally Posted by BEER WHORE
    DOC sust any advice for pain in the disc between the shoulder blades
    tough area to rehab on your own, upper thoracic spine, i think more of a pain management with adjustments and triggerpoint therapy on the rhomboids and traps and thoracic paraspinal muscles would help relieve the pain, also,i am abig fan of ice to alleviate pain and inflamation

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    All I know is prior to switching to strong range partials reps I had severe misalignment of the L4 & L5 vertebrae w/ the discs beginning to slip and become herniated/inflamed w/ visible swollen nerve endings.

    After ceasing doing deep squats which cause extreme lateral pressure against the lower lumbar vertebrae and beginning to do strong range partial squats my vertebrae "magically" re-aligned themselves and the pain completely subsided, which was proven by a series of Xrays done at 1mo. intervals for 3 months after correct the problem. My quads have NEVER been larger/stronger than present in case any trainer wannabe's are reading this. Full range reps are for fools. Power Factor / Static Contraction Training will be proven in the future to be superior to outdated training "theorys" augmented by equally overdone drug regimens.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pneumatic
    All I know is prior to switching to strong range partials reps I had severe misalignment of the L4 & L5 vertebrae w/ the discs beginning to slip and become herniated/inflamed w/ visible swollen nerve endings.

    After ceasing doing deep squats which cause extreme lateral pressure against the lower lumbar vertebrae and beginning to do strong range partial squats my vertebrae "magically" re-aligned themselves and the pain completely subsided, which was proven by a series of Xrays done at 1mo. intervals for 3 months after correct the problem. My quads have NEVER been larger/stronger than present in case any trainer wannabe's are reading this. Full range reps are for fools. Power Factor / Static Contraction Training will be proven in the future to be superior to outdated training "theorys" augmented by equally overdone drug regimens.
    no. full range reps are fine, just not for you. i do full reps with insane weights as a powerlifter and i have no pain at all. i do however agree with you about the drug regimen in the US and dont agree with just treating symptoms and not fixing the problem.

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    I'm sure u if anyone here is aware of the literally staggering (up to 10x) load increase which occurs in the bottom position of the barbell back squat on the lumbar vertebrae. That accompanied by the hyperextension the patella tendon undergoes during full range squats makes doing full range reps w/ the goal of maximum muscular size/strength pointless. A MUCH higher EMG is acheived thru doing strong range relatively high reps w/ as much as & more than 140% of a trainee's 1RPM. Full range reps are very much a necessary evil in powerlifting as a demonstration of temporary strength. For bodybuilding purposes...they're nowhere near as intense on the exercised muscle (NOT cardiovascular system) as strong range partial reps. The above study and I'm sure there will many more in the future bears this out.

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    RONINASAUNA is offline Associate Member
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    Thanks for the great article, it is a fantastic read.


    I would love to know your opinion on substitution or "safe"-er exercises one would use after rehab from a back injury (such as a microdiscectomy L5-S1 I had).

    I am too scared to attempt free weight squats or deads even with the lightest weights.


    Just looking for your feelings on what are approved movements one could use in trying to lift as much weight as possible and trying to increase lean body mass after such a back injury....

    Appreciate any input!!

    thanks again

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    Since I'm not a chiro/doc I don't know. All I do know is after ceasing full range squats and immediatly initiating partial range reps my lumbar EXTREME pain quickly subsided and X rays proved it. The vertebrae realigned themselves and the nerve endings no longer were inflamed/swollen. I never lost a bit of size/strength and have since dramtically increased size/strength since beginning PFT. In another 10-20yrs I don't think any will be doing full range reps for size. PFT is just too far ahead of its time...for now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pneumatic
    I'm sure u if anyone here is aware of the literally staggering (up to 10x) load increase which occurs in the bottom position of the barbell back squat on the lumbar vertebrae. That accompanied by the hyperextension the patella tendon undergoes during full range squats makes doing full range reps w/ the goal of maximum muscular size/strength pointless. A MUCH higher EMG is acheived thru doing strong range relatively high reps w/ as much as & more than 140% of a trainee's 1RPM. Full range reps are very much a necessary evil in powerlifting as a demonstration of temporary strength. For bodybuilding purposes...they're nowhere near as intense on the exercised muscle (NOT cardiovascular system) as strong range partial reps. The above study and I'm sure there will many more in the future bears this out.
    i do agree or BBing full ROM is not a necessary all the time, but i also find that doing partial reps only also had negative effects, i honestly think from my experience, the best idea woul be to do both, switching it up from workout to workout, keep full range of motion movement light and saving heavier work for partial, one can alternat this every other wk or maybe every few micro cycles. the truth is it all depends on your goals and what muscle groups you are trying to make stronger or larger.. i am a fan of partial reps and do alot of them myslef in the press ,squat and dead, i was once convinced that partials were all that was needed to gain strength anf that fullROM was a waste just as you are saying, i found i was gravely wrong. after an extneded period of time , i began to hit plateaus for both size and strenght and couldnt break them, when i added the lighter full ROM back into the equation and utilized partial movements together, i made great gains quickly, the truth is, ther is not one correct way to train, if it is working for you keep it up, just keep an open mind on full range reps and dont count them out. as far as the load on the lumbar spine, i find a solid belt and strenghtening abdominal and transvere abdominal muscles as well as all the lumabr extensor muscles helps tremendously. working on core strength is necessary IMO for both BBing or functional training to help injury prevention. and as far as the knees and the hyperextension of the patellar tendon, i do agree the full squats can do damage after along period of time, only way to combat this is to wrap your knees lightly on all sets, i used to think this was a waste but now i know, if you plan to keep lifting into the later years of life, start wraping your knees noe. knee replacement surgery is a bitch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RONINASAUNA
    Thanks for the great article, it is a fantastic read.


    I would love to know your opinion on substitution or "safe"-er exercises one would use after rehab from a back injury (such as a microdiscectomy L5-S1 I had).

    I am too scared to attempt free weight squats or deads even with the lightest weights.


    Just looking for your feelings on what are approved movements one could use in trying to lift as much weight as possible and trying to increase lean body mass after such a back injury....

    Appreciate any input!!

    thanks again
    shoot me a PM or start a new thread in the forum for imput from others as well as me. how long ago was the surgery and what exercise have you done for legs and low back since?also, what are your goals with training? functional use or do you train for aesthetics and how you look?

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    I do agree w/ U in that occaisonal use of full range reps are a good plataeu buster. I think ull agree this all revolves around Dr Seyles (spell?) G.A.S. theory - Generalized Adaption Syndrome

    This theory works on the premise that stimulus (regardless of what type; partials,full, static) even surgical (LapBand, Gb, etc.) has a threshold where it will cause change and a ceiling where it no longer will illicit a positive response. Training w/ wgts is nothing but an exploitation of the body's wonderful enviromental adaption which has allowed humans to evolve to survive in they're world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pneumatic
    I do agree w/ U in that occaisonal use of full range reps are a good plataeu buster. I think ull agree this all revolves around Dr Seyles (spell?) G.A.S. theory - Generalized Adaption Syndrome

    This theory works on the premise that stimulus (regardless of what type; partials,full, static) even surgical (LapBand, Gb, etc.) has a threshold where it will cause change and a ceiling where it no longer will illicit a positive response. Training w/ wgts is nothing but an exploitation of the body's wonderful enviromental adaption which has allowed humans to evolve to survive in they're world.
    well my friend, you have done your home work, i couldnt have said it better myself. sounds like you know what to do. keep up the good work.i am not familiar with dr. seyles, if you have some of his info documented feel free to print it up and post so everyone can read the info. i think alot of lifters get stuck in one set idea and never think outside of the box and continually do the same or similar routines, the body adapts and the gains stop. change is crucial, you have to keep the body guessing, fool the CNS and not fry it by overloading and burning out do the same ting time and time again

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    Numerous sources citing GAS >

    "The Stress of Life" by Hans Selye has helped us define stress. Much of his work was done with rats where he consistently saw physiological changes due to stress: hypertrophy (increase in size) of the adrenal gland, stomach ulcers, and atrophy (Decrease in size, wasting away) of the lymphatic organs. This work led
    the author to coining the General Adaption Syndrome (G.A.S.). The G.A.S. occurs chronologically in three stages.

    In The Stress of Life, Hans Seyle used the phrase General Adaption Syndrome to describe an organism's response to stress. He listed some of the observable signs of stress to be: hyperexcitation, impulsive behavior, inability to concentrate, hypermotility, and accident proneness.

    The General Adaption Syndrome, a normal human response to stress, is comprised of the following > hypothalmic-pituitary-adronocorticol (HPA) axis activity, release of cortisol the “stress hormone” , activity of the neurotransmitter serotonin.

    General adaptation syndrome: a three-stage pattern of response to stress, in which physical functioning moves from 1) the alarm reaction to 2) the stage of resistance to (in some cases) 3) the stage of exhaustion; a concept developed by Hans Selye

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    Word. Very nice research and very accurate. Follows along with many of my textbooks.

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    any questions PM me

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    would like to pm you, but i cant
    hope your reading this

    i think i have a buldging disk in my back
    it the one below the L5
    it looks like the outer side of the vertebrae is pushed up towards my L5, there is not really a space there

    i did it 2.5 years ago doing squats and just worked my way through it

    i tweaked it again the other day and my dad rode my ass to go the doctor before its too late

    waiting on a call back to get the official results, but the x-ray tech thought thats what it was

    i did heavy squats tues and felt fine, supposed to do heavy back today

    any suggestions on what i can do to rehab

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    get an mri, start passive therapy and pain modalities with a PT or a DC

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc.Sust
    shoot me a PM or start a new thread in the forum for imput from others as well as me. how long ago was the surgery and what exercise have you done for legs and low back since?also, what are your goals with training? functional use or do you train for aesthetics and how you look?
    I have not yet read all of the quotes from this forum, but, I just wanted to show my appreciation for the information you have provided.
    I have a herniated L5. My sports therapist tells me to stop lifting altogether. This is because not only is my L5 herniated, but, it is also degenerating. She says to me, "What part of me telling you that your L5 is OBLITERATED do you not understand?"
    This is quite frustrating because I used to be overweight for almost 17 years (ranging from 275 to 316 pounds). I started working out about 7 years ago. I am now at about 210 with slight fluctuations.
    My point is this, I have a weak back.....this I know. It hurts pretty much all the time (been like this since I can remember). Of course when I jog or do other exercises that obligate me to use my back, it can get much worse.
    With having the condition I have, what back exercises to you recommend me do to strengthen it to the point that I don't have to feel like, "****, I have to go to the gym today!" because my back hurts so bad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theforce3169
    I have not yet read all of the quotes from this forum, but, I just wanted to show my appreciation for the information you have provided.
    I have a herniated L5. My sports therapist tells me to stop lifting altogether. This is because not only is my L5 herniated, but, it is also degenerating. She says to me, "What part of me telling you that your L5 is OBLITERATED do you not understand?"
    This is quite frustrating because I used to be overweight for almost 17 years (ranging from 275 to 316 pounds). I started working out about 7 years ago. I am now at about 210 with slight fluctuations.
    My point is this, I have a weak back.....this I know. It hurts pretty much all the time (been like this since I can remember). Of course when I jog or do other exercises that obligate me to use my back, it can get much worse.
    With having the condition I have, what back exercises to you recommend me do to strengthen it to the point that I don't have to feel like, "****, I have to go to the gym today!" because my back hurts so bad.
    i would recomend exercises that wouldnt directly but force on the disc, or the least amount possible, avoid squats and deadlifts, and deadlift variations. i would work with hyper extensions, a revers hyper machine if your gym has one, glute ham raises, also anything that works your core stabilizers. crunches, wobble board, grapppler exercises etc etc, the key is to work your core muscles, but do so indirectly therefore you dont aggrevate your condition. some exercises will work better than others. you have to find what works for yourself. find a functional training exercise guide. this will give you some of the newest ideas and exercises that sport trainers are using today

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    Doc sust.
    I am 31 and I usually am well involved in lots of different physical sports. I have suffered from a lower back issue for some years now which I recently pulled again. This time it has stopped me from exercising fully for 1 year now. I was on strong painkillers for 7mths and I attended physio and a pilates class a few months ago, which kind of helped. It is a lot less painful now but rather sore at times and stiff. I want to start exercising again in order to strengthen my abs and lower back. I know I must start gently at first However, as before I always seem to develop other injuries or aggrevate the same injury. Is there a specific type, make or brand of steroid that you can recommend to assist in my recovery, preferably not by needle?
    There are so many to choose from, HELP?
    Last edited by babyWayne; 03-26-2008 at 06:29 AM.

  27. #27
    kfrost06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pneumatic View Post
    Here's even more proof >

    This isn't really breaking news because it was reported back in August of 2004 in the Journal of Strength Conditioning Research. I ran into it a couple of days ago and thought you'd be interested.

    The article:

    An Analysis of full range of motion vs. partial range of motion training in the deveopment of strength in untrained men.

    It describes a study done over a 10 week period at the University of Southern Mississippi on 46 untrained men.

    Guess what they found. Partial range exercises produced as high a strength gain in the full range bench press as full range exercises did.

    Now in the study there is no indication that anyone was using anywhere near the kind of resistances we normally use so the best they did was to exactly match the results of full range. The exercise was the bench press).

    But when you consider all the years people have said that full range was absolutely required it really makes me wonder why this wasn't big news on the cover of every fitness magazine when it broke. I just happened to be browsing around when I hit upon it.

    Here's why this is major news.

    In 1991 Pete Sisco along with John Little wrote and sold thousands of copies of their research findings concerning their discovery that full range of motion was not required to produce strength gains.

    That was really just the first step along a thousand mile journey leading up to today, but that first step was really picked on by experts from corners everwhere who said, "You have to have full range of motion, you have to have full range of motion" and more of that type of phrase over and over again.

    I want to applaud them for taking that first step.

    I'm not sure what there motivation was for doing it, I know I didn't have any input.

    But what I really like is that finally they are getting started on realizing that full range isn't required. Once they've taken that step it finally opens the door up to the next 20 discoveries that take us from where Power Factor training was in 1991 to where we are today.

    So this is good news for those of you who have to answer to people who continually tell you that partial range can't work. Just let them know they haven't kept up with the latest university studies.
    This study is done on "untrained men". People that work out doing partial ROM are a joke and wasting MY time. I also notice these clowns are the ones that have to load the bar with weights and never re-rack it when done doing their 1/4 rep sets. I would like to see a bench constest for 1/2 rep maximum, there is none.

  28. #28
    kfrost06's Avatar
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    Nice article Doc! I just recently injured my spine doing deadlifts. I will have some questions for you when you get a chance.

  29. #29
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    Herniation and degenerative L5

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc.Sust View Post
    also read the posts on cryotherapy and heat
    Hi, I am somewhat new to lifting, exercise and dieting.

    Here's my story, I went into a deep depression at 10 years old due to some serious physical and mental trauma. I became a food addict, which turned to other things not too long after.

    So, from 14 to 31 saw me....completely out of shape and depressed. My average weight in my 20's was about 270. In 1998, I went to prison and decided to get into shape. Let me tell you, they had a 440 track there and I couldn't hardly jog 100 yards before I was ready to die. I would jog that 100 yards and walk the rest of the track. I started out doing this 2 times. At this time I weighed a staggering 310 pounds.

    I played handball alot, did some pushups and situps (was never good at those), and I was able to jog up to 12 laps which equals 3 miles. After 9 months I was down to 240 pounds. I was very happy with myself. You got to understand that I was deeply depressed, ****ed up on drugs, and absolutely hated the way I looked.

    Doing this gave me a feeling about me that I had never experienced before. Can you imagine being overweight, depressed, homicidal, suicidal, and really hating the way you look for your whole life thus far?? I was like this and it ****ing sucked!!!

    So, like I said, I felt a sense of accomplishment that I never had in my life before. I actually ran into someone I met in there and he mentioned how impressed he was with my determination. At one time, I was the only person on the yard in 106 degree weather jogging around the track.

    I got out, struggled with my drug addiction, went into rehab, went back up to about 260. I made a decision to stay clean and sober. My head told me that if I was going to have any comfort in my sobriety I had better get this eating thing and weight thing under control.

    Luckily I had no other major responsibilities in my life other than to do this program and stay sober. I began to workout.......everyday. I had no education whatsoever in dieting and exercise. As a matter-of-fact, I went on what I now call, a starvation diet. 3 meals a day only, and one small snack. I jogged on the treadmill about 2 miles everyday and did some minor weightlifting.

    Let me tell you, i couldn't even curl 10 pounds......LOL!!! Anyway I eventually got down to 186 pounds......yes.....186 pounds!!!! A trainer at the gym was telling me, "dude, you are losing this weight way too fast and its not healthy." I didn't give a rat's ass, I was on a mission!!!

    Here is where I need your help. I have always had a bad back, I never knew exactly what the diagnosis was. One day, I found out that I have a herniated and degenerating L5. My sports therapist, at that time suggested working my core, pilates, etc. Well, I did and here is what happened.....

    I am sure that this is not strictly due to running on the treadmill (though, I can't run anymore because of my back), but perhaps it was a combination of many things: poor lifting posture, doing too much, etc. My back has gotten tremendously worse since I first started working out 7 years ago. Since then, I have concentrated on lifting, have put on some muscle and weigh about 215 (Oh yeah, I am 6'3" tall).

    On top of my back getting worse, I had this weird experience with my abdominal section that would take another book to describe it to you. Let me just say that one day I was doing abs and I had a pain so severe it felt like someone gutted me with a red hot ****ing knife!!!! I was on the floor writhing in pain, I COULD'NT even breathe. After numerous doctors I finally heard a theory that sounds good.......

    I was overweight for so long that I had stretched out my stomach muscles. I am not a doctor, but, I assume it is the outer muscle wall. And, now I am on the verge of a hernia. I have stopped working my abs, and consequently my core (lower back as well) due to this.

    Okay, here is how it all ties in. First, I have alot of back pain, it keeps me from doing what I want. It debilitates me. I want to go to the gym (and I do) but knowing that I can't work the way I want to makes me not want to go. My sports therapists first suggestion was to work the core, but, now due to this weird ab phenomena I can't do that. NOT ONLY THAT, she has been telling me over the past 3 years to basically stop working out.....especially lifting!!!

    She tells me to.............go swim............go walk. I tell her, "are you serious??" All these years being an insecure kid, esp concerning my looks, having doctors telling me I was fat, out of shape and that I need to exercise and now you are telling me to stop, are you ****ing kidding???"

    She tells me that my back is only going to get worse, and the thing is...........is that it has!!!! Now this ab thing, she tells me to not do abs either......swim instead!!!!

    Listen, I am not a ****ing fish and I didn't get this far with my body and my working out to ****ing give UP!!!! THIS IS BS!!!!!!

    CAN YOU PLEASE help me. Advise, suggestions, doctors, therapy, surgery's, whatever!!! I cannot see me stop working out, I'll go insane!!!

    I really, really want to improve my working out, but because of my back and ab thing I am losing a battle to............laziness due to pain and lack of motivation. Please.....anyone............HELP!!!

    Thanks...................shawn

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc.Sust View Post
    i would recomend exercises that wouldnt directly but force on the disc, or the least amount possible, avoid squats and deadlifts, and deadlift variations. i would work with hyper extensions, a revers hyper machine if your gym has one, glute ham raises, also anything that works your core stabilizers. crunches, wobble board, grapppler exercises etc etc, the key is to work your core muscles, but do so indirectly therefore you dont aggrevate your condition. some exercises will work better than others. you have to find what works for yourself. find a functional training exercise guide. this will give you some of the newest ideas and exercises that sport trainers are using today

    Thank you for the response. I do not have a problem admitting this, but I have no idea what a wobble board or grappler exercises are. Do you know of a "functional training guide"?

    Thanks!!

  31. #31
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    Also, do you have any suggestions, comments, thoughts, ideas for this ab thing?
    Seriously, the few times I tried afterwards were met with the same agonizing results. This ab thing happened about 2 years ago, and, I have only recently began to do the "slightest" ab exercises. I mean, I am scared!!!!

    Oh, and sorry for cursing so much in my very long reply. I am just completely frustrated!!!

  32. #32
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    3169-I would go get more opinions on your back issue. I have a long story to tell, but the bottom line is that different doctors have different perspectives.

    Also, I'm not expert, but the logic behind "stretching you ab muscles because you were overweight" I'm not sure that is possible physically.

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but fat lays on top of muscle. Stretching your ab muscles due to being overweight, makes no more sense that stretching you pec muscles because of pec fat.

  33. #33
    anabolicphenomenon is offline New Member
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    thanks for this thread! very educational and helpful.

    Have been suffering from disk rupture at L5 for the past year.

    any AAS or research peptides that would be useful in the strengthening the core stage of recovery? Thnx

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by anabolicphenomenon View Post
    thanks for this thread! very educational and helpful.

    Have been suffering from disk rupture at L5 for the past year.

    any AAS or research peptides that would be useful in the strengthening the core stage of recovery? Thnx
    TB500 has been helping mine quite a bit

  35. #35
    rynev33 is offline New Member
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    TB500 helped me also

  36. #36
    RUDY 6 is offline New Member
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    Awesome post about the lower back. I am currently trying to rehab my back and it seems as though I am not getting anywhere but am glad I stumbled across this thread cause I will definitely use it as reference for rehab

  37. #37
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    Thanks for all the good info!

  38. #38
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    Going through the full ROM is important, most injuries occur at the end of full ROM and you want to strengthen the muscle through the full ROM. I don't see people just doing partial BB curls for their workouts, they mix them in with full ROM, and that is no different for squats. The important thing is what is full ROM for a squat? It depends on your hip mobility, some guys with great hip mobility can go below 90 degrees and maintain the correct lumbar curve. Other guys who don't have the hip mobility go below 90 degrees and their lumbar curve compensates for lack of hip mobility, it turns outward to a kyphotic curve and injury comes shortly after. The key thing is to know your full ROM and go to the end of that, you wont get injured if you stay within your available motion and avoid compensation. My full ROM is about 85-90 degrees any deeper and my lumbar form is lost, yours might be 80 degrees, 110 degrees, have someone watch you from a lateral view (or videotape yourself) you'll see when your lumbar curve turns out and that's your limit unless you increase your hip mobility in the future

  39. #39
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    Quick tip for anyone just starting some lumbar injury rehab. Walking with ankle weights can help get a nice pump into your lower back and get that blood flow to the area you need for healing.

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