Anabolics
Search More Than 6,000,000 Posts
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Hazard's Avatar
    Hazard is offline AR-Elite Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,396

    2 chemistry questions..... come on u chem specialists!

    Sister needs help with these 2 questions.... these are 11th grade level... i'm of no use

    1) In what 2 ways is energy involved in a chemical change?

    2) Whats the color of solutions containing copper compunds?

    any help? thanks bro's!
    ~haz~
    Failure is not and option..... ONLY beyond failure is - Haz

    Think beyond yourselves and remember this forum is for educated members to help advise SAFE usage of AAS, not just tell you what you want to hear
    - Knockout_Power

    NOT DOING SOURCE CHECKS......


  2. #2
    Psychotron's Avatar
    Psychotron is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,581
    Quote Originally Posted by Hazard
    Sister needs help with these 2 questions.... these are 11th grade level... i'm of no use

    1) In what 2 ways is energy involved in a chemical change?

    2) Whats the color of solutions containing copper compunds?

    any help? thanks bro's!
    ~haz~
    Chemical changes involve chemical bonding forces. For example, atomization of water involves snapping two oxygen-hydrogen bonds. Since chemical bonds are much stronger than intermolecular forces, chemical changes require (or release) far more energy than phase changes.

    A chemical change either consumes or produces energy. Note that there can never be a production of new energy, it is simply lost or stolen.

    Copper

    A fairly soft metal (hardness 2.5-3.0.) It is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity, and is very malleable and ductile. It has a characteristic red colour when fresh (copper-red), but tarnishes to a greenish colour (have a look at an old 1 or 2 cent coin). Copper dissolves easily in acid. Because it is such a good conductor and it is so ductile, copper is mainly used in electrical goods. The chemical symbol for copper is Cu.

  3. #3
    kloter1's Avatar
    kloter1 is offline Southern Steel Bodybuilding
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Bubba Army
    Posts
    5,821
    1. The change of a substance into another substance, by recombination of the atoms, i.e. by the making and breaking of chemical bonds. chemical reaction takes place. Examples: Rusting of iron and the decomposition of water
    2. sounds easy but i have no clue

  4. #4
    Hazard's Avatar
    Hazard is offline AR-Elite Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,396
    hey this is sis, thanks a lot guys!! You really helped!
    Failure is not and option..... ONLY beyond failure is - Haz

    Think beyond yourselves and remember this forum is for educated members to help advise SAFE usage of AAS, not just tell you what you want to hear
    - Knockout_Power

    NOT DOING SOURCE CHECKS......


  5. #5
    rambo's Avatar
    rambo is offline The Lord God
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    BURNING THE CAPE
    Posts
    3,035
    2. Copper solutions are usually browinish-red, with a rust color.

  6. #6
    Lozgod's Avatar
    Lozgod is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Philly - Better than you
    Posts
    6,834
    Quote Originally Posted by rambo
    2. Copper solutions are usually browinish-red, with a rust color.
    I believe they are actually blue or white.

  7. #7
    Blown_SC is offline Retired Vet
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,917
    Copper solutions are generally blue...

    It's a characteristic of the copper ion in a water solution...

  8. #8
    Lozgod's Avatar
    Lozgod is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Philly - Better than you
    Posts
    6,834
    For bragging rights, I answered both questions at 7:16 on AM, so I win. Where is my prize?

    Today, 07:16 PM
    Lozgod
    CHEMISTRY EXPERT Join Date: Sep 2004
    Location: Alltell Stadium
    Posts: 5,955



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hazard
    1) In what 2 ways is energy involved in a chemical change?

    2) Whats the color of solutions containing copper compunds?

    any help? thanks bro's!
    ~haz~



    1. Energy is needed to do one of 2 things. Either combine atoms to initiate a change, or break down atoms to initiate a change.

    2. I don't know for sure, but I believe it is blue or white.

  9. #9
    Hazard's Avatar
    Hazard is offline AR-Elite Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,396
    prize??
    Failure is not and option..... ONLY beyond failure is - Haz

    Think beyond yourselves and remember this forum is for educated members to help advise SAFE usage of AAS, not just tell you what you want to hear
    - Knockout_Power

    NOT DOING SOURCE CHECKS......


  10. #10
    Hazard's Avatar
    Hazard is offline AR-Elite Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,396
    nevermind didn't know what you were talking about...
    Failure is not and option..... ONLY beyond failure is - Haz

    Think beyond yourselves and remember this forum is for educated members to help advise SAFE usage of AAS, not just tell you what you want to hear
    - Knockout_Power

    NOT DOING SOURCE CHECKS......


  11. #11
    Lozgod's Avatar
    Lozgod is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Philly - Better than you
    Posts
    6,834
    Quote Originally Posted by Hazard
    nevermind didn't know what you were talking about...
    Hazard said you were going to paypal the winner $50. I want my money.

  12. #12
    Psychotron's Avatar
    Psychotron is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,581
    I dont think it is ever blue. I think it depends on the acidicity of the solution.

  13. #13
    Lozgod's Avatar
    Lozgod is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Philly - Better than you
    Posts
    6,834
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychotron
    I dont think it is ever blue.
    I have liquid copper for my salt water aquarium and guess what color it is???

  14. #14
    Psychotron's Avatar
    Psychotron is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,581
    Meh it's been a while since chemisty im a freaking software engineer lol

  15. #15
    Lozgod's Avatar
    Lozgod is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Philly - Better than you
    Posts
    6,834
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychotron
    Meh it's been a while since chemisty im a freaking software engineer lol
    I didn't care about chemistry until I made my first gear conversion. After my nolvadex crashed, it became an obsession. True story.

  16. #16
    Powrlftr is offline Associate Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    447
    Quote Originally Posted by Hazard
    Sister needs help with these 2 questions.... these are 11th grade level... i'm of no use

    1) In what 2 ways is energy involved in a chemical change?

    2) Whats the color of solutions containing copper compunds?

    any help? thanks bro's!
    ~haz~
    1) It's been a LONG time since general chem and I have none of my chem books with me here but ..... I think they are asking for exothermic and endothermic reactions, in the former the reaction will give off energy as heat, and in the latter energy is taken to reach the Ea, or energy of activation, and so you must add heat, or energy, to the system in order to get the reaction to occur. They may be asking for the more specific terms exergonic and endergonic though.
    Exothermic reaction: Dissolving sodium hydroxide in water, if you make a 50% NaOH solution w/v it will boil.
    Endothermic reaction Dissolution of NH4Cl in water: if you measure the temperature it will drop. The reaction proceeds without heating because it is driven by entropy.

    2) This is an easy one ... Cu(I) solutions are green, and Cu(II) solutions are blue.
    Last edited by Powrlftr; 03-15-2005 at 08:17 PM. Reason: typo

  17. #17
    Ravi's Avatar
    Ravi is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by Blown_SC
    Copper solutions are generally blue...

    It's a characteristic of the copper ion in a water solution...

    Correct. If you have ever given blood. You know they drop a drop of you blood into a blue solution (copper sulfate) If your blood clumps together and sinks you have enough iron in your blood.

  18. #18
    Powrlftr is offline Associate Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    447
    Quote Originally Posted by Lozgod
    For bragging rights, I answered both questions at 7:16 on AM, so I win. Where is my prize?

    Today, 07:16 PM
    Lozgod
    CHEMISTRY EXPERT Join Date: Sep 2004
    Location: Alltell Stadium
    Posts: 5,955



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hazard
    1) In what 2 ways is energy involved in a chemical change?

    2) Whats the color of solutions containing copper compunds?

    any help? thanks bro's!
    ~haz~



    1. Energy is needed to do one of 2 things. Either combine atoms to initiate a change, or break down atoms to initiate a change.

    2. I don't know for sure, but I believe it is blue or white.
    You only win if you are RIGHT

    Just for your own edification .... Answer 1 is right enough in it's own vague way, but your wording makes me think you are making an atomic bomb
    Just remember that chemical bonding occurs solely in the valence electrons, and to remove an inner shell electron you need much more energetic types of radiation, such as x-rays. In chemical reactions we are mainly dealing with infra-red radiation or microwaves.

    For number 2, you need to be able to make the distinction between clear and opaque, and colorless and colored. By white I assume you mean colorless, which for most transition metals is wrong. Remember for d-block elements, or transition metals, the d shell electrons are farther away from the nucleus so less energy is needed to get them in an excited state, so that means that less energetic forms of electromagnetic radiation is needed, and consequently when they fall back to their ground state they often emit radiation within the visible spectrum. (all electrons will emit radiation when excited, but electrons in p or s orbitals will absorb energy of a shorter wavelength and emit energy in a shorter wavelength, usually in the UV spectrum.

  19. #19
    Hazard's Avatar
    Hazard is offline AR-Elite Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,396
    lol thanks bro for the help with my sis's chem questions..... i wish i woulda known about this baord back when iw as in HS few years ago.... you guys would ahve done all my homework LOL

    BTW loz..... an atom hasn't been "fused" yet..... but like i said in that other post at AR... we are on the brink of doing it.... if you wanan dig the post up and put it here so everyone know what we're talkin about... do so.. im too lazy
    Failure is not and option..... ONLY beyond failure is - Haz

    Think beyond yourselves and remember this forum is for educated members to help advise SAFE usage of AAS, not just tell you what you want to hear
    - Knockout_Power

    NOT DOING SOURCE CHECKS......


  20. #20
    Powrlftr is offline Associate Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    447
    Quote Originally Posted by Hazard
    BTW loz..... an atom hasn't been "fused" yet..... but like i said in that other post at AR... we are on the brink of doing it.... if you wanan dig the post up and put it here so everyone know what we're talkin about... do so.. im too lazy
    Atoms have been fused before .... it's called a hydrogen bomb. Stars are also doing fusion all the time

    I know, I know .... you are referring to controlled nuclear fusion.

  21. #21
    Hazard's Avatar
    Hazard is offline AR-Elite Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,396
    Quote Originally Posted by Powrlftr
    Atoms have been fused before .... it's called a hydrogen bomb. Stars are also doing fusion all the time

    I know, I know .... you are referring to controlled nuclear fusion.
    LMFAO yeah....... a professor had told me that he talked with a leading scientist in the project.... it will take a heat 7 times hotter than the sun to fuse 2 atoms together..... the only thing that can contain a heat THAT hot.... is pure energy..... pure engery can't be created nor destroyed....

    so they somehow wrapped this "heat" in pure energy.... and the scientist had said that so far... they've gotten a reaction... but he couldn't say anymore.

    he said if they can successfully doit..... 1 square inch of sea water will be able to power a city for "xx" ammount of time.... i can't remember the numbers
    Failure is not and option..... ONLY beyond failure is - Haz

    Think beyond yourselves and remember this forum is for educated members to help advise SAFE usage of AAS, not just tell you what you want to hear
    - Knockout_Power

    NOT DOING SOURCE CHECKS......


  22. #22
    Powrlftr is offline Associate Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    447
    I remember some years ago the Japanese were working on a fusion reactor. Their method was to contain the plasma with a magnetic field, they used huge torus shaped magnets. Apparently this didn't work since I heard about this 10 years ago or so.

  23. #23
    Lozgod's Avatar
    Lozgod is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Philly - Better than you
    Posts
    6,834
    Quote Originally Posted by Hazard

    BTW loz..... an atom hasn't been "fused" yet..... but like i said in that other post at AR... we are on the brink of doing it.... if you wanan dig the post up and put it here so everyone know what we're talkin about... do so.. im too lazy
    I meant that atoms in a chain aka a molecule. Not individual atoms. I am not a good explainer, just a good understander of things and stuff.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •