Anabolics
Search More Than 6,000,000 Posts
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Money Boss Hustla's Avatar
    Money Boss Hustla is offline Retired Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,101

    Exclamation A much needed hockey fix

    Report: NHL, NHLPA agree on cap formula



    The Globe and Mail reports that the NHL and NHL Players' Association have agreed on a formula for a salary-cap system based on team-by-team revenue.

    According to the Globe's league and player sources, a salary floor and cap will be based on a percentage of each NHL team's revenue. The paper adds that in the first year - based on revenue projections by both sides - the salary cap will range from $34 million to $36 million US, with the floor from $22 million to $24 million US.

    The salary-cap issue was seen as the biggest hurdle in talks for a new collective bargaining agreement.

    The Globe also reports that the formula calls for a dollar-for-dollar luxury tax to kick in at the halfway mark between the floor and the cap. If the floor of the lowest team is $22 million US and the cap on the highest team is $36 million US, then the 'tax level' will be $29 million US.

    The formula would allow wealthier teams to spend a bit more money, but would also bridge the large gaps in spending between higher payroll teams and lower payroll teams.

    Union spokesperson Jonathan Weatherdon, however, said the Globe's report was premature.

    "The NHLPA and NHL discussions this week continue to cover a range of issues such as controls on team salaries, revenue sharing, Olympic participation, the amateur player draft and player retention rights," Weatherdon said. "While the parties continue to have discussions to reach a common ground no agreements have been reached."

    Small group labour talks between both sides ended late Tuesday night and resume today in New York with a larger group meeting.

    Both sides have carried over the momentum from last week when 34 hours of talks were described as 'progressive' from both sides.

    There are several issues to iron out, but sources in both camps told the Globe there's a chance a deal could be done before July. Still, both sides also concede there are potential pitfalls that could prevent an agreement from being reached.

    Today's session is the 21st meeting between the two sides since the season was cancelled Feb. 16.

    Files from CP and The Globe and Mail were used for this report.

    http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/news_story.asp?id=127314

  2. #2
    Money Boss Hustla's Avatar
    Money Boss Hustla is offline Retired Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,101
    NHL group to recommend changes

    TORONTO (CP) - Now we'll see what becomes of it all.
    The three-day NHL research camp was full of interesting experiments on how to spark more offence, and now a select group of club executives will mull over the proceedings and recommend changes.

    Use of shootouts during the regular season, reintroduction of tag-up offsides, stiffer obstruction rules and smaller equipment for goaltenders have the strongest chance of being implemented.

    Some of the wilder tests, including bigger nets and pass lines allowing puck movement all over the ice without offsides calls, probably will be deemed in the end to be too radical to apply. But minds were opened to new possibilities, which was what the camp was intended for.

    ''The process now will be to evaluate all of this,'' said Bryan Murray, head coach of the Ottawa Senators. ''There's a variety of things that could be considered to put into our game to add a little spice and to get a new look when the (collective bargaining agreement) is resolved.''

    It was the first comprehensive on-ice attempt towards altering the NHL product, and for that director of operations Colin Campbell and right-hand man Mike Murphy have to be congratulated.

    ''There's some things you can discard, and there's some things you can say, `Hey, let's take another look at this,''' said Murphy.

    The operations department brought in a main group that included general managers Bob Gainey of the Montreal Canadiens, Kevin Lowe of the Edmonton Oilers and Darcy Regier of the Buffalo Sabres to closely watch the experiments. All other teams were invited last month and about one-half of the league's GMs were in attendance. Others sent coaches or staff members. As many as nine U.S. teams were not represented.

    ''I don't think it was detrimental,'' Murphy said of the absentee rate. ''A lot of general managers are very busy at this time.

    ''This is the time of year you prepare your scouts for the draft and prepare your draft list and I'm sure a lot of them are going through that process. But a lot of them had people here. I can't believe what a good turnout we had.''

    The main group will evaluate what was viewed during scrimmages put on by undrafted juniors and college players at an airport-district rink.

    ''We'll probably have a round table at some point to determine what everybody felt and sort out all the ideas,'' said Murphy.

    A report would be drafted. Many hope a new competitions committee with teeth will be formed to then study it and recommend changes to the board of governors.

    Murray doesn't advocate radical change but isn't opposed to tweaking things.

    ''I don't know that a lot is necessary to fix our game,'' he said. ''We hear about the (neutral zone) trap and we hear about not enough goal scoring but we've got a terrific game.

    A session like this, though, looking at things that at one time or another we've all talked about, I believe will result in something more being added.''

    While he's not a fan of the shootout, Murray concedes it's time might have arrived for the NHL.

    ''I personally have never seen anything wrong with a tied hockey game but it seems that there is a real push to settle games and that's obviously one way of creating excitement at the end of a game,'' said Murray. ''There is an element of excitement there for the fans. I think that will be very seriously considered.''

    The smaller goalie equipment used this week - egads, one could actually see netting behind the trimmed-down pads and sweaters - is subject to debate with the NHL Players' Association. But Campbell is sure he'll get it through.

    ''The smaller goaltender equipment has really got a chance to happen,'' said Boston Bruins president Harry Sinden.

    It's important that the three days doen't result in a pile of papers gathering dust on a shelf, said Regier, putting in his two cents for a strong competitions committee.

    ''I think it's critical that the rigth process is in place,'' said Regier. ''It has to be a collaborative effort including players, coaches, general managers, and people like Harry Sinden who have the historical perspective.

    ''Colie's challenge is going to be to put the right process in place to achieve the things we need to do to be effective custodians of the game.''

    http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/news_story.asp?id=127367
    Last edited by Money Boss Hustla; 06-09-2005 at 12:07 AM.

  3. #3
    Money Boss Hustla's Avatar
    Money Boss Hustla is offline Retired Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,101
    Neely among Hall of Fame inductees

    TORONTO (CP) - Injuries may have cut Cam Neely's career short but that didn't stop the former Boston Bruins star from entering the Hockey Hall of Fame.

    Neely, the late Russian superstar Valeri Kharlamov and longtime amateur hockey executive Murray Costello were named to the Hall of Fame on Wednesday. The induction ceremony is scheduled for Monday, Nov. 7.

    ''I can't quite fathom yet what this means,'' Neely said. ''Being in the Hall with all the other great players is quite an honour.'' The 18-member selection committee again declined to pick 608-goal scorer Dino Ciccarelli. Also passed over again was Glenn Anderson, one of the top playoff performers in NHL history. A candidate requires 14 votes to get in.

    Neely, a power forward, played for Vancouver and Boston between 1984 and 1996, scoring 395 goals, assisting on 299 and serving 1,241 penalty minutes in 726 regular-season games. His 55 playoff goals are a Boston club record. The six-foot-one right-winger was a five-time all-star and made such an impression in Boston that his No. 8 sweater was retired last year.

    Hip and leg injuries ended his career prematurely.

    ''It wasn't the way any athlete wants to leave sport,'' he said. ''It was difficult the first couple of years.

    "I lived in the moment when I was playing and I didn't really look at what my career was all about until long after I retired. I have some regrets, feeling I didn't enjoy it as much as I should have while I was playing, but looking back at all the great relationships I made after coming from a small town to Boston, it's all been great.''

    Kharlamov became recognized during the 1972 Summit Series as one of the greatest forwards to play in Russia. He died in an auto crash in 1981 at the age of 33. His son, Alexander, was five at the time.

    ''Thank you to everybody who selected my father,'' he said from Moscow. ''I can't believe it.

    ''I want to say thank you to all Canadian people who remember my father.''
    Costello, 71, who grew up in the Timmins, Ont., region, was president of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association - now Hockey Canada - from 1979 to 1998. He played 162 NHL games in the 50s but he's going into the Hall in the builders' category for his organizational work.

    ''I never envisioned it would end up like this,'' he said from his Ottawa home. ''To see myself among the people in that Hall is difficult to comprehend.''

    He currently is on the executive council of the International Ice Hockey Federation.

    Neely would go through a defencemen if he felt he couldn't skate around him.

    ''I gave everything I could each shift,'' said Neely. ''I may not have played well each shift but I tried as hard as I could each shift.

    ''My physical play was something I took great pride in. I knew I had to play very physical to be successful.''

    The fact he got in with lesser stats than players such as Ciccarelli and Anderson won't bother him.

    ''To be quite honest, I learned a long time ago not to concern myself with things I can't control,'' he said. ''I'm certainly honoured that the selection committee looked at not just points and production but at my impact on the game.

    ''I'm very appreciative of that fact. I'd have loved to have played another handful of years at a level I would have wanted to compete at to have (better) stats.''

    His first comeback from injuries earned him the Bill Masterton Trophy in 1994. He'd been drafted by the Canucks but only played two years with them before an unexpected trade. The way it worked out, he was happy it happened because he wasn't satisfied with how he was being used in Vancouver. Now this.

    ''My hip does not bother me right now,'' he said.

    Kharlamov stood only five foot eight but helped Red Army win 11 league championships and skated on eight world-champion Soviet sides. He won Olympic gold in 1972 and 1976.

    In Game 6 of the '72 Series, Canadian forward Bobby Clarke slashed Kharlamov and broke his ankle. Canada won the game and the next two as well and all Kharlamov could do was sit with his crutches and watch.

    Alexander Kharlamov said his father's teammates have told him how good his dad was on ice.

    ''I was told he was a great player who had great opportunities,'' he said.

    Selection committee members Serge Savard and Stan Mikita played against Kharlamov, committee members Scotty Bowman and Harry Sinden coached against him, and the Hall opened an expanded international section on Tuesday.

    ''His talents were God-given and he could do practically everything - a smart play, a tricky pass, a precise shot,'' said Vladislav Tretiak, a former teammate and a Hockey Hall of Fame member. ''Everything he did looked so easy, so elegant.

    ''His execution of hockey was aesthetic and he amazed millions.''

    Before Kharlamov, the last individual to be selected posthumously was Roy Conacher in 1998.

    Costello played in NHL games with Boston, Chicago and Detroit, where selection committee member Al Arbour was a teammate. He finished up with a senior team in Windsor, Ont., in 1960.

    While heading the CAHA, the process that led to formation of the national junior team was started.

    ''The success of that program remains rewarding to me,'' said Costello. ''Players who were on our national junior teams still respond to the call to play for the country and that is quite special to me.'' Another defining moment in the development of the sport during his presidency was the merger of Hockey Canada and the CAHA, which brought the entire development process into one stream.

    ''I think it has made a lot of difference in the sport in this country,'' he said. ''They game has been better, particularly on the development side, because of that.''

    Committee chairman Jim Gregory wouldn't bite when reporters sought specifics on why players such as Ciccarelli and Anderson again were bypassed.

    ''Our confidentiality agreement doesn't allow us to comment,'' said Gregory.

    He mentioned others who haven't been inducted who might be worthy. Claude Provost was on nine championship Montreal teams but has never been selected.

    ''I get only one vote,'' he said. ''I try to put an exceptional person in the Hall, and I have confidence that the people sitting beside me do the same.

    ''It is not easy to get in. It is a very difficult thing.''

    Among first-year eligibles, goalie Mike Vernon was among those with the highest-profile credentials. But he was passed over, too.

    Patrick Roy, who will be eligible next year, might as well start making travel plans for the 2006 induction gala.

    Other committee members are Colin Campbell, Pat Quinn, Emile Francis, Marty Pavelich, Richard Patrick, Ed Chynoweth, John Davidson, Eric Duhatschek, Mike Emrick, Dick Irvin, Yvon Pedneault and Frank Selke.

    http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/news_story.asp?id=127349
    Last edited by Money Boss Hustla; 06-09-2005 at 12:05 AM.

  4. #4
    Money Boss Hustla's Avatar
    Money Boss Hustla is offline Retired Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,101
    Phantoms one win away from title



    PHILADELPHIA (AP) - The Phantoms are one win away from bringing a championship to title-starved Philadelphia.

    Mike Richards and Patrick Sharp scored first-period goals and goaltender Antero Niittymaki made the lead stand as the Phantoms - the top affiliate of the NHL's Philadelphia Flyers - earned a 2-1 win over the Chicago Wolves in Game 3 of the Calder Cup final Wednesday night.

    Philly's championship drought is as well known around town as its historic landmarks and cheesesteaks. None of Philadelphia's four major professional teams has won a championship since the 76ers captured the NBA title in 1983, and those pro franchises have won only nine titles in more than 120 years.

    The Eagles came close earlier this year, losing 27-24 to New England in the Super Bowl.

    While an AHL title probably won't satisfy Philadelphia's long-suffering faithful, the Phantoms - 1998 Calder Cup champions - are on cruise control.


    Game 4 is Friday night at the Wachovia Center. Game 5, if necessary, also will be in Philly on Saturday.

    Again the Phantoms were backed by a stellar effort from Niittymaki, who has been nearly flawless in the series. He's allowed just two goals in the first three games and had 29 saves in Game 3 against the Atlanta Thrashers' AHL affiliate.

    Even with more than 24,000 fans across the street to watch the Phillies, nearly 12,500 festive hockey fans were rocking and waving their white towels from the opening faceoff.

    With 20 orange banners representing Flyers glory hanging from the rafters - remember the Patrick Division? - the Phantoms wasted little time taking control with two first-period power-play goals.

    Richards gave Philadelphia a 1-0 lead at 8:50 on a snap shot from the right circle and Sharp followed just over a minute later when he came up with the puck after a mad scramble in front of the net and knocked it past Kari Lehtonen.

    J.P. Vigler scored in the second period for Chicago, which won the Calder Cup in 2002.

    The Flyers have been one of the most successful organizations in the NHL, reaching the playoffs in 30 of their 37 years. They've won the Stanley Cup twice and played in the finals seven times.

    But it's been 30 years since Bernie Parent and Bobby Clarke led the Flyers to their last Stanley Cup crown.

    The Phantoms won 2-1 in Game 2 in Chicago in double overtime after a 1-0 victory in the series opener.

    http://www.tsn.ca/news_story.asp?ID=127386

  5. #5
    RA's Avatar
    RA
    RA is offline Grade A Beef
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Getting madcow treatments
    Posts
    18,715
    Never thought they would agree on anything..its about time. Go Wings!

  6. #6
    Money Boss Hustla's Avatar
    Money Boss Hustla is offline Retired Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,101
    Flames!!!


  7. #7
    Money Boss Hustla's Avatar
    Money Boss Hustla is offline Retired Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,101
    ...and Flyers!!

  8. #8
    symatech's Avatar
    symatech is offline Retired Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    not where I want to be
    Posts
    7,546
    It's the Blackhawks year i know it!!!!!!




    and if any of you dis the blackhawks there's gonna be a misunderstanding in here! I don't care if they are the worst team in the NHL....consistently. They are due!

  9. #9
    Heracles74's Avatar
    Heracles74 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    1,196
    Go Blues!!!

    The Black hawks?!?! They still have a team?? LOL!!! J-K symatech

  10. #10
    needmorestrength's Avatar
    needmorestrength is offline Anabolic Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Canada eh
    Posts
    7,079
    Quote Originally Posted by symatech
    It's the Blackhawks year i know it!!!!!!




    and if any of you dis the blackhawks there's gonna be a misunderstanding in here! I don't care if they are the worst team in the NHL....consistently. They are due!
    Hahahahhahahahhahahahahahahahhahahahahahahahahhaha ha Sorry
    seriously sorry but hahahahahhahahahahahahahhaha.. They should just dismember that team

  11. #11
    juicy_brucy's Avatar
    juicy_brucy is offline Ripped, not bulky
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Whistler, B.C. CANADA
    Posts
    2,717
    Quote Originally Posted by Money Boss Hustla
    Flames!!!

    GO FLAMES GO!!!!
    I heard that mika kiprusoff got traded. too bad. He is my favroite goalie. Jarome got a pay raise. I think that everyone else is still on the team. Did anyone hear about any other trades. I'm dying to know. Hopefully the NHL will be able to get back on it's feet and we'll all be watching hockey.

    GO FLAMES GO!!!

  12. #12
    Sta11ion's Avatar
    Sta11ion is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Toronto 5days Miami 2days
    Posts
    731
    Go leafs go,

  13. #13
    Money Boss Hustla's Avatar
    Money Boss Hustla is offline Retired Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,101
    Quote Originally Posted by juicy_brucy
    I heard that mika kiprusoff got traded. too bad. He is my favroite goalie.
    WTF!? You're joking!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •