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Thread: norethisterone

  1. #1
    fullysik1 is offline New Member
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    norethisterone

    I found some hormone pills made by schering from australia and they are norethisterone..I was wondering if anybody knows if that can be used as an anti-e and if it is similar to nolvadex or clomid in any way...
    has anybody ever used it or heard of norethisterone before?

  2. #2
    Rickson's Avatar
    Rickson is offline AR-Hall of Famer
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    Here is an abstract I found on it. I don't think it can be used as an anti progesterone and I don't see anything that would allow it to be an anti-e. It looks like nasty stuff to me but have never dealt with it.


    Norethisterone is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen based on sufficientevidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals (IARC V.6, 1974; IARC V.21, 1979; IARCS.4, 1982). When administered in the diet, norethisterone increased the incidences of benignliver cell tumors in male mice and male rats and pituitary tumors in female mice and inducedbenign and malignant mammary tumors in male rats. When administered subcutaneously, thecompound induced granulosa cell tumors in ovaries of mice.There are no data available to evaluate the carcinogenicity of norethisterone in humans(IARC S.4, 1982).

    PROPERTIES
    Norethisterone occurs as a white, odorless, crystalline powder with a slightly bitter taste.It is practically insoluble in water and nonvolatile oils, slightly soluble in diethyl ether, andsoluble in ethanol, acetone, chloroform, dioxane, and pyridine. It is unstable in the presence ofair and light. When heated to decomposition, it emits acrid smoke and fumes. Norethisterone isavailable in the United States as a grade containing 97%-102% active ingredient on an anhydrousbasis.

    USE
    Norethisterone, an orally active progestin, has been used in small amounts in humanmedicine since 1957 to treat conditions such as amenorrhea, dysfunctional uterine bleeding,endometriosis, premenstrual tension, and dysmenorrhea. Since 1962, the most common use inthe United States has been as the progestin in progestin-estrogen combination oralcontraceptives. Norethisterone has been used in the treatment of inoperable malignantneoplasms of the breast or as an adjunct to surgery or radiotherapy (IARC V.21, 1979).Norethisterone is also used as an intermediate in the commercial synthesis of norethisteroneacetate and possibly in the synthesis of ethynodiol diacetate (IARC V.6, 1974).OHCH3OHCCHHHH
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    Page 2
    Norethisterone (Continued)REASONABLY ANTICIPATED TO BE A HUMAN CARCINOGENNINTH REPORT ON CARCINOGENSPRODUCTIONChem Sources International indicated that one domestic firm supplies norethisterone(Chem Sources International, 1988). Norethisterone is not produced in the United States. Dataon imports were not available. Total U.S. sales for human medicine containing norethisteronehave been estimated to have been < 4,400 lb/year prior to 1972 (IARC V.6, 1974).EXPOSUREThe primary routes of potential human exposure to norethisterone are ingestion, dermalcontact, and inhalation. When used as an oral contraceptive, it is usually given in a dose of 0.5-2.0 mg daily in combination with mestranol or ethinylestradiol. It is also used continuously at adaily dose of 0.35 mg in the so-called contraceptive "mini-pill." In its other medicinal uses,norethisterone is given in daily doses ranging from 10 to 30 mg (IARC V.21, 1979). Potentialoccupational exposure may occur through inhalation or dermal contact for workers involved inthe manufacture, formulation, packaging, or administration of norethisterone. In a study carriedout in a factory producing oral contraceptives, norethisterone was found in various sectors of theworking environment at concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 59.56 µg/m3and in wipe samplesfrom 0.019 to 14.7 µg/cm3(IARC V.21, 1979).REGULATIONSBecause this chemical is used as a pharmaceutical and in low quantities relative to otherchemicals, it is not regulated by EPA. However, there may be a small pollution problem relativeto hospital wastes. FDA regulates norethisterone under the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act(FD&CA) as a prescription drug approved for human use. FDA has ruled that oralcontraceptives for general use must carry patient and physician warning labels concerning use,risks, and contraindications. OSHA regulates norethisterone under the Hazard CommunicationStandard and as a chemical hazard in laboratories Regulations are summarized in Volume II,Table B-113.

  3. #3
    fullysik1 is offline New Member
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    damn

    shit stayin away from that stuff- thanks bro

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