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  1. #1
    Deltasaurus's Avatar
    Deltasaurus is offline The Over Analyzing Nattabolic
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    Please read

    Ok i hurt myself not bad though, i did stiff legged deadlifts on saturday and was fine sunday and i think i slept wrong sunday night,because today my syadic* (spelling sux)nerve on my left side is bothering me, has anyone had this and can someone advise me on how to fix it, thanks all help is much apreciated


    -AJ

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    Lemonada8's Avatar
    Lemonada8 is offline Knowledgeable Member
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    how do u know its ur sciatic nerve? if you slept wrong on it, just stretch the area...

  3. #3
    Deltasaurus's Avatar
    Deltasaurus is offline The Over Analyzing Nattabolic
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    I thik its sciatic nerve cuz its like a nerve in my lower back and its causing sharp pain and discomfort in my left leg in my upper glute

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    xlxBigSexyxlx's Avatar
    xlxBigSexyxlx is offline CHEMICALLY ENGINEERED
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    Sciatica - Topic Overview
    What is sciatica?
    Sciatica is pain, tingling, or numbness produced by an irritation of the nerve roots that lead to the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve is formed by the nerve roots coming out of the spinal cord into the lower back. Branches of the sciatic nerveextend through the buttocks and down the back of each leg to the ankle and foot.

    What causes sciatica?
    The most common cause of sciatica is a bulging or ruptured disc (herniated disc) in the spine pressing against the nerve roots that lead to the sciatic nerve. But sciatica also can be a symptom of other conditions that affect the spine, such as narrowing of the spinal canal (spinal stenosis), bone spurs (small, bony growths that form along joints) caused by arthritis, or nerve root compression (pinched nerve) caused by injury. In rare cases, sciatica can also be caused by conditions that do not involve the spine, such as tumors or pregnancy.

    What are the symptoms?
    Symptoms of sciatica include pain that begins in your back or buttocks and moves down your leg and may move into your foot. Weakness, tingling, or numbness in the leg may also occur.

    Sitting, standing for a long time, and movements that cause the spine to flex (such as knee-to-chest exercises) may make symptoms worse.
    Walking, lying down, and movements that extend the spine (such as shoulder lifts) may relieve symptoms.
    How is sciatica diagnosed?
    Sciatica is diagnosed with a medical history and physical exam. Your doctor will ask you questions about your symptoms. And your doctor may be able to tell just by asking you these questions that you have sciatica, but X-rays and tests such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are sometimes done to help find the cause of the sciatica.

    How is it treated?
    In many cases, sciatica will improve and go away with time. Initial treatment usually focuses on medicines and exercises to relieve pain. You can help relieve pain by:

    Avoiding sitting (unless it is more comfortable than standing).
    Alternating lying down with short walks. Increase your walking distance as you are able to without pain.
    Taking acetaminophen (Tylenol) or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen (Aleve).
    Using a heating pad on a low or medium setting, or a warm shower, for 15 to 20 minutes every 2 to 3 hours. You can also try an ice pack for 10 to 15 minutes every 2 to 3 hours. There is not strong evidence that either heat or ice will help, but you can try them to see if they help you.
    Additional treatment for sciatica depends on what is causing the nerve irritation. If your symptoms do not improve, your doctor may suggest physical therapy, injections of medicines such as steroids , or even surgery for severe cases.




    http://www.webmd.com/back-pain/tc/sc...topic-overview

  5. #5
    Deltasaurus's Avatar
    Deltasaurus is offline The Over Analyzing Nattabolic
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    ^^^^^Thanks BigSexy your a homie fo sho!

  6. #6
    amcon's Avatar
    amcon is offline physical pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside... The pain of quiting will lasts forever!!
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    another place to look is your IT band, and peraphormus(spelling doesnt sux just creative)where they intersect is over the Sciatic... go to a good chiro doc and have them bend you around... or a good butt massage will totally fix that -

    i get the same prob from the same movement - they say it is very common with skiers and cyclists(pedal bikes, not cycling gear - lol)

    or just set up a time w dsm (lol & pukinng)

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