View Poll Results: Which job would you personally rather do?

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  • Registered Nurse

    4 30.77%
  • Physical Therapist

    9 69.23%
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    Shsm is offline Senior Member
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    Which job would you rather do? Help a young guy find his place in the world.

    **Both career choices suit my interests. I would like your personal opinions on each please.**

    Registered Nurse: Job Profile & Salary



    Overall Score: 8.2

    Number of Jobs: 711,900 Median Salary: $64,690
    Unemployment Rate: 5.5% Job Satisfaction: MEDIUM

    Overview

    From the delivery room to the hospice center, there are few parts of the medical lives of Americans untouched by the skilled hands of nurses. As one of more than 2.7 million registered nurses on the job today, you'll be tasked with treating and educating patients, explaining prescriptions and procedures, administering medication, or managing medical records. While many RNs work in hospitals or physicians' offices, more are finding jobs in public health, home care, or alternate care settings such as rehabilitation centers, schools, or businesses. There is also plenty of specialization within the field. You could focus on the care of patients following heart surgery as a cardiovascular nurse, or even aid in treating brain or spinal cord injuries as a neuroscience nurse.

    Even in a tough economy, nursing has flourished compared with most other occupations. Thanks in part to an aging population, job growth is expected to be much faster than the national average. The greatest job growth will be in physicians' offices. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects registered nurse employment growth of 26 percent between 2010 and 2020, adding 711,900 more positions. Solid employment growth and a wide range of job prospects help make registered nursing a top healthcare job, as well as the No. 1 career on our list of The Best Jobs of 2012.

    Salary

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports the median annual wage for a registered nurse was $64,690 in 2010. The best-paid 10 percent of RNs made approximately $95,130, while the bottom 10 percent made approximately $44,190. The highest wages are reserved for personal care nurses, or those working for private-sector pharmaceutical or medical device manufacturers. By location, the highest-paid positions are clustered in the metropolitan areas of northern California, including municipalities in and around San Jose, Oakland, and San Francisco.

    Salary Range

    75th Percentile Wage: $79,020
    Median Wage: $64,690
    25th Percentile Wage: $52,980

    Training

    At a minimum, an entry-level nursing job requires a bachelor of science degree in nursing, an associate's degree, or a diploma program administered in a hospital. The two-year associate's degree can be a quicker and more economical route, but many graduates of associate's programs eventually aim to complete a bachelor's degree for a more comprehensive nursing education, and experts say that the bachelor's degree is fast becoming the industry standard. For those who have already earned a bachelor's degree in a different field, accelerated B.S.N. degree programs can last from 12 to 18 months. Students must also pass a national licensing examination known as the National Council Licensure Examination, and may have to meet other requirements which vary by state. Many nurses choose to pursue master's degrees in advanced practice nursing specialties, such as a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist.

    Reviews and Advice

    "Even though there's great growth potential, the market is still competitive," says Donna Cardillo, RN, a speaker known as the "career guru" for nurses. She recommends nurses use both traditional and virtual tricks of the interviewing trade, including printing business cards for the interview process (many nurses don't) and keeping up-to-date profiles on social media sites like LinkedIn. The most effective job leads, however, come from one-on-one contacts that can be found by joining professional organizations like state chapters of the American Nurses Association or other specialized professional groups. For older job seekers looking to enter the field, Cardillo recommends they play up their experience in non-nursing fields, as those experiences can show a more diverse set of skills. Another tip: Look beyond the hospital. Nurses are fanning out into a host of jobs, ranging from rehab and long-term care facilities to nurse-run community clinics, schools, or corporations where preventative care and wellness are becoming a bigger focus—and a bigger source of jobs. "The whole job market is shifting," Cardillo says.

    Job Satisfaction

    Upward Mobility: Average
    Stress Level: Above Average
    Flexibility: Average

    Physical Therapist: Job Profile & Salary



    Overall Score: 6.9

    Number of Jobs: 77,400 Median Salary: $76,310
    Unemployment Rate: 5.5% Job Satisfaction: HIGH

    Overview

    This hands-on career is also one of the fastest growing. As one of the 198,600 physical therapists in the United States, you might work in a clinic, hospital, or private office, and your patients could include an aging athlete, a recent accident victim, or a young person with lower back pain. It's your job to test and measure their coordination, muscle strength, range of motion, and motor function. From your examination, you must determine a strategy for treatment, so they can regain mobility, be relieved of pain, or learn to live with a disability. You may consult with other medical care providers, including physicians, occupational therapists, and social workers.

    Job opportunities look good in the field, and employment is expected to grow much faster than average thanks to rising demand for such services among aging baby boomers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects physical therapist employment growth of 39 percent between 2010 and 2020, with the field adding 77,400 more jobs. Thanks to good job opportunities for physical therapists, it lands at No. 8 on The Best Jobs of 2012 list.

    Salary

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports the median annual wage for a physical therapist was $76,310 in 2010. The best-paid 10 percent of workers in the category made approximately $107,920, while the bottom 10 percent made approximately $53,620. The highest wages are found in physician offices or hospitals. By location, the highest-paid positions are clustered in the metropolitan areas of McAllen, Texas, Madera, Calif., and Fairbanks, Ark.

    Salary Range

    75th Percentile Wage: $90,350
    Median Wage: $76,310
    25th Percentile Wage: $64,230

    Training

    At a minimum, you'll need a master's degree and a state license to become a practicing therapist. Many students currently pursue a doctor of physical therapy degree (DPT), and new graduates taking the national licensure examination in the field after 2017 will be required to hold such a degree. Most doctoral programs last three years, compared with two or two and a half for a master's. Many licenses also require continuing education in order to stay certified.

    Reviews and Advice

    On-the-job internships are a required part of any physical therapist's training, and experts say that's the place to make the connections that will land you a job. "It's a unique opportunity for students to pay attention to what they like or don't like," about the job or a particular type of practice, says Janet Bezner, deputy executive director of the American Physical Therapy Association. Starting the job hunt while still in school is key, she says, as is narrowing the type of patients you'd like to treat, be they orthopedic, pediatric, geriatric, or another demographic, as well as the size and style of practice that will best suit you. She also advises applicants to highlight other skills in addition to their PT education and training. For example, Bezner notes a variety of skills, from a Pilates certification to an MBA, can add something extra when joining a practice. Plus, she says the current environment is a "buyer's market," so applicants have more room to tailor their job hunt to their own specifications.

    Job Satisfaction

    Upward Mobility: Below Average
    Stress Level: Below Average
    Flexibility: Above Average

    For your very much appreciated time...




  2. #2
    Hunter's Avatar
    Hunter is offline Grateful
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    I am an Rn and couldnt imagine doing anything else.

    I am working on our air life(helicopter) program and before that I dealt with wound care mostly pressure sores and diabetic ulcers.
    Last edited by Hunter; 10-17-2012 at 04:07 PM.

  3. #3
    Shsm is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter View Post
    I am an Rn and couldnt imagine doing anything else.
    Awesome! Here are a few questions if you don't mind me asking...

    1. How much do you make an hour?
    2. What are your hours?
    3. What's the gnarliest thing you've ever seen?
    4. Have you banged any of the hot nurses?

    Excuse that last question if you want.

  4. #4
    Ernst's Avatar
    Ernst is offline Borderline Personality
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    Physical therapists don't have to wipe asses.

  5. #5
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    gixxerboy1 is offline ~VET~ Extraordinaire~
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    my opinion with a nurse you can do more. There are so many places you can work and different jobs you can do. But depending where you work the hours and shifts may be crap. And you may be doing complete different job at different places

    as a pt you know what you will be doing for ever. Your hours will be more controlled no matter where you work. You could eventually open your own practice as a nurse you cant.

    i would do pt
    If people can't tell your on steroids then your doing them wrong

  6. #6
    cherrydrpepper's Avatar
    cherrydrpepper is offline Knowledgeable Member
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    I think as a nurse you can do a variety of things. This is the things I see nurses do in a retirement home that I would not want to do:

    1: Help people dying of old age.. sorry not something I like to think about / see on a daily basis
    2: Help people dying in general
    3: Deal with IVs, trachea tubes, pee bag tubes, all kinds of nasty tubes and blood and guts stuff
    4: Deal with bodily fluids - shit, piss, phleghm, pus etc
    5: Roll large people over to change their diaper for adults
    6: Pick up large people to shower them

    My hat is off to them and I salute them.. I just do not want to do those things.

  7. #7
    Shsm is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherrydrpepper View Post
    I think as a nurse you can do a variety of things. This is the things I see nurses do in a retirement home that I would not want to do:

    1: Help people dying of old age.. sorry not something I like to think about / see on a daily basis
    2: Help people dying in general
    3: Deal with IVs, trachea tubes, pee bag tubes, all kinds of nasty tubes and blood and guts stuff
    4: Deal with bodily fluids - shit, piss, phleghm, pus etc
    5: Roll large people over to change their diaper for adults
    6: Pick up large people to shower them

    My hat is off to them and I salute them.. I just do not want to do those things.
    I know what you mean. My grandfather, who was a US Navy Pilot, was diagnosed with dementia and adult failure to thrive. The nurses had to literally do everything for him. It was torture seeing him deteriorate like he did, it really was. He died last March at 92. He didn't even know who I was at the end.

    Thank you everyone for your replies,. I appreciate them more than you think.

  8. #8
    Shsm is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by gixxerboy1 View Post
    my opinion with a nurse you can do more. There are so many places you can work and different jobs you can do. But depending where you work the hours and shifts may be crap. And you may be doing complete different job at different places

    as a pt you know what you will be doing for ever. Your hours will be more controlled no matter where you work. You could eventually open your own practice as a nurse you cant.

    i would do pt
    Thank you sir, I understand what you're saying. School time is the main deciding factor for me. I would enjoy either career and a bachelor's degree sounds much less stressful than a master's to me. I'm fine with the crazy hours but the variety of different roles like you mentioned gets to me. I don't want to be wiping asses and showering elderly individuals for the rest of my life.
    Last edited by Shsm; 10-17-2012 at 04:34 PM.

  9. #9
    Noles12's Avatar
    Noles12 is offline Knowledgeable Member
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    If you want to go the physical therapy route I would suggest getting your DPT. The field is competitive and a masters is not what it used to be. It is simply the minimum

  10. #10
    MickeyKnox is offline Banned
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    RT, hands down. Little to no bodily fluids to deal with. Little to no germs/sickness. And in waaay more demand, if the US is anything like Canada.

    But, the US offers signing bonuses for nurses...niiice!

  11. #11
    Hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shsm View Post
    Awesome! Here are a few questions if you don't mind me asking...

    1. How much do you make an hour?
    2. What are your hours?
    3. What's the gnarliest thing you've ever seen?
    4. Have you banged any of the hot nurses?

    Excuse that last question if you want.
    I am salaried now at 77,000 a year. When I worked the floor(I still do on occasion) I made 32 an hour plus a company car and gas paid. I traveled doing wound care for small hospitals and nursing homes I would have made much more in a city.

    Right now I work 8-5 that will change once the program is up and running. When I was traveling. It was like 8 to 5 plus driving time.

    I have seen pressure sores on the cocyx so deep you see bone and gotten to do wound care to those types of situtions. Ive seen an arm ripped off in a farming accident. Lots and lots of wet to dry treatments for wounds along with debreading them. I've seen maggot therapy as well.

    I am married but it wouldnt be hard

    Get your masters it was the best thing I did as far as my career goes.
    Last edited by Hunter; 10-17-2012 at 05:07 PM.

  12. #12
    Shol'va's Avatar
    Shol'va is offline Productive Member
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    You could always be a head nurse, no ass wiping involved there either. Maybe a little cleanup afterwards though...

  13. #13
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    bikeral is offline Life is only stressful if you care!
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    I work in a hospital and see that the RN's have great benefits 34 days a year paid time off, sign on bonuses, great pay. Also seems like they are always hiring nurses. Like said before RN's can pretty much work anyplace.

    Now with that said I am sure it is not for everyone. Need to deal with sick. Usually 12 hour shifts. If you screw up you can kill someone. I'm sure there are more downsides.

  14. #14
    Hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherrydrpepper View Post
    I think as a nurse you can do a variety of things. This is the things I see nurses do in a retirement home that I would not want to do:

    1: Help people dying of old age.. sorry not something I like to think about / see on a daily basis
    2: Help people dying in general
    3: Deal with IVs, trachea tubes, pee bag tubes, all kinds of nasty tubes and blood and guts stuff
    4: Deal with bodily fluids - shit, piss, phleghm, pus etc
    5: Roll large people over to change their diaper for adults This does happen but rarely thats why cna's exist
    6: Pick up large people to shower them cna job again

    My hat is off to them and I salute them.. I just do not want to do those things.
    see bold

  15. #15
    Hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ErnstHatAngst View Post
    Physical therapists don't have to wipe asses.
    That is most likely the job of the cnas.

  16. #16
    Shsm is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter View Post
    I am salaried now at 77,000 a year. When I worked the floor(I still do on occasion) I made 32 an hour plus a company car and gas paid. I traveled doing wound care for small hospitals and nursing homes I would have made much more in a city.

    Right now I work 8-5 that will change once the program is up and running. When I was traveling. It was like 8 to 5 plus driving time.

    I have seen pressure sores on the cocyx so deep you see bone and gotten to do wound care to those types of situtions. Ive seen an arm ripped off in a farming accident. Lots and lots of wet to dry treatments for wounds along with debreading them. I've seen maggot therapy as well.

    I am married but it wouldnt be hard

    Get your masters it was the best thing I did as far as my career goes.
    Thank you very much man. This sounds awesome and definitely something to pursue.

  17. #17
    Lunk1's Avatar
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    Couldn't do either...both sound rather boring and involve way to much hand holding. After the last cpl cop threads in here I am thinking of following Bronzers foot steps...I think I want to be a cop!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ErnstHatAngst View Post
    Physical therapists don't have to wipe asses.
    +1 that is what I was thinking. A lot less (none) blood, guts, disease and dealing with drugged out messed up people.

    Doing PT you are helping people heal.

  19. #19
    Misery13 is offline Not Here
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    My voted for squats.

  20. #20
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    Kawigirl is offline Knowledgeable~Female Member
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    You can be a nurse, work in Canada (particularly in my province) ...and make 6 figures.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kawigirl;621***2
    You can be a nurse, work in Canada (particularly in my province) ...and make 6 figures.
    Its not unheard of here in the states either. They have much opportunity for overtime and make big $ when doing it. Same with working holidays.

  22. #22
    Renesis's Avatar
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    I'd rather be a RN because yeah you have to deal with some dumb crap but you do get to see some really cool injuries.

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