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  1. #1
    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Angry Thyroid Problems & Blood Work

    Hey everyone,

    Just looking for some guidance and support or information anyone might have to offer with my current blood test results and me being hypothyroid.

    Just some background, this all started about 4-5 months ago when I was progressively getting to a good size being 6'2 at 190lbs after 3 years of busting my A$$ to only pretty much lose it all within a couple of months and drop to 170 lbs. At that height it is pretty slim and I've always hated being the "skinny guy". This had all put me in a pretty serious depression, couldn't sleep, no motivation, sexual dysfunction, the list goes on and still facing all these symptoms. With that happening I proceeded to visit my general doctor and obviously received a "your going to be okay, give it time" answer. I pretty much forced her to test my testosterone as I knew something wasn't right.

    2012/12/10 - Initial Blood Work
    Glucose Serum Random - 3.4 mmol/L (3.6-7.0 Normal, 7.1-11.0 Risk of Diabetes)
    RBC Indices - MCG - 33 (27-32pg)
    Free Testosterone - 52.0 pmol/L

    After this and still receiving the same answer from my doctor, I asked to be referred to an Endocrinologist specialist who ordered more blood work.

    2013/04/08 - Blood Work
    TSH - 15.38 mIU/L (0.35 - 5.00 Normal Range)
    LH - 4 IU/L (2 - 9 Normal Range)
    DHEAS - 6.3 umol/L (1.91 - 13.4 Normal Range)
    FSH - 3 IU/L (2 - 12 Normal Range)
    Testosterone (23.6 nmol/L (7.6 - 31.4 Normal Range)
    Estradiol - 79 pmol/L (<157 Range)
    Free Testosterone - 58.2 pmol/L
    Androstenedione - 8.4 nmol/L

    2013/04/22 - Follow up Thyroid Blood Work
    TSH - 20.31 mIU/L (0.35 - 5.00 Range)
    T4 Free - 12 pmol/L (12 - 22 Range)
    Free T3 - 4.1 pmol/L (2.6 - 5.7 Range)
    Thyroid Peroxidase AB - >1000 kIU/L (<35 Range)

    I still feel like I have low testosterone or something is still wrong. I've been taking my medication for the past 2 weeks (0.025mg) of LEVO-THYROXINE and still do not feel any major changes. I am required to go for more blood tests in 4 weeks to see where my levels sit at and if their needs to be an adjustment in my medication. Bodybuilding lifestyle being something I love, this has set me back majorly as I can hardly make it to the gym now and my eating habits have gone down the drain and can't even build muscle and still feel like i'm losing gains i've made. Everything is going wrong and I'm in a major hole. Not sure what to even do.

    Sorry for the lengthy post, thought I might as well get it all out so nobody misses any information right off the bat.

    Thanks guys really appreciate any help

    One last thing, I dont understand how I can be hypo or hyper as my T3 and T4 are in check. Only my TSH is out of balance??? Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I'll have this moved to the HRT forum where you'll get more responses from guys who are knowledgable about blood work.

    And usually when TSH is high and thyroid hormone numbers are low or normal it indicates a lazy thyroid or hypothyroidism due to the pituitary having to produce high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone to normalize t3 and t4 levels.

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    Freestyle Child,

    You have Hashimoto's disease. Your immune system is attacking your thyroid. (Thyroid peroxidase is a measure of your body's fight against your thyroid.)

    Your doctor is probably going to keep increasing your levothyroxine until your TSH is in the 1.0 - 2.0 range.

    Your TSH is so high because you have a weakened thyroid.

  4. #4
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    I've been on 100mcg synthroid (same med as yours) for 15 yrs. When I was hypo and had a tsh level similar to yours, I was a walking, fat zombie. Fatigue, depression, weight gain(20+lbs), zero libido, etc... life was horrible. I would imagine that this could be the root of your issue. It will take time for the doc to get the right dose. Hopefully, sooner than later.

  5. #5
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    Very well could be Hashimoto's like DD said. That's the highest TSH I've seen posted here actually.
    Have you had an MRI by chance? Curious about a TSH secreting pituitary tumor as well.
    -*- NO SOURCE CHECKS -*-

  6. #6
    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty11 View Post
    I've been on 100mcg synthroid(same med as yours) for 15 yrs. When I was hypo and had a tsh level similar to yours, I was a walking, fat zombie. Fatigue, depression, weight gain(20+lbs), zero libido, etc... life was horrible. I would imagine that this could be the root of your issue. It will take time for the doc to get the right dose. Hopefully, sooner than later.
    You hit it right on the head man, feel like such a piece of s**t. Its unreal I hate it, the funny thing is i've lost 20 lbs of muscle.

    Quote Originally Posted by kelkel View Post
    Very well could be Hashimoto's like DD said. That's the highest TSH I've seen posted here actually.
    Have you had an MRI by chance? Curious about a TSH secreting pituitary tumor as well.
    No haven't had an MRI done, i've went for ultrasounds on my boys and that as it. Shes currently researching natural desiccated thyroid med for me as she usually doesn't prescribe it. (The usual)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelkel View Post
    Very well could be Hashimoto's like DD said. That's the highest TSH I've seen posted here actually.
    Have you had an MRI by chance? Curious about a TSH secreting pituitary tumor as well.
    I agree with kelkel here. Get your prolactin checked.

    On a positive note, you have good T4 to T3 conversion. You said you're taking 0.025 mg of T4? That's 25 mcg, I think, which is very low dose. Your T4 is (barely) in the normal range, but I think your doctor will titrate it up.

    Your estrogen is high, too :-/ Did your doctor mention anything about correcting it?
    Last edited by phaedo; 05-22-2013 at 05:53 AM.

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    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by phaedo

    I agree with kelkel here. Get your prolactin checked.

    On a positive note, you have good T4 to T3 conversion. You said you're taking 0.025 mg of T4? That's 25 mcg, I think, which is very low dose. Your T4 is (barely) in the normal range, but I think your doctor will titrate it up.

    Your estrogen is high, too :-/ Did your doctor mention anything about correcting it?
    I was wondering about my estrogen because I've notice some high estro sides and some slight gyno that I'm in the middle of getting delt with.

    Yes I just started on 0.25mcg it's been about 3 weeks now and I talked to my endo and mentioned I feel slightly better as my fatigue has subsided a little bit and that we should possibly do the new blood work now instead of waiting another 3 weeks.

    My main concern is my muscle loss, can't seem to find anywhere of thyroid disease being linked to muscle loss at all...

    Thanks man

  9. #9
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    I am currently going through the same BS.
    My TSH was 11.65 my Dr put me on 75mcg everyday.
    I've been on it for the last 3 weeks and I have lost about 10 pounds which is crazy.

    I really didn't have any big symptoms of being hypo. I'm 5'10 and was around 170.
    I'll be following this thread closely.

  10. #10
    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DB1982 View Post
    I am currently going through the same BS.
    My TSH was 11.65 my Dr put me on 75mcg everyday.
    I've been on it for the last 3 weeks and I have lost about 10 pounds which is crazy.

    I really didn't have any big symptoms of being hypo. I'm 5'10 and was around 170.
    I'll be following this thread closely.
    Nice to hear that someone is in the same boat, isn't hypo supposed to make you gain weight?

    I was 190lbs at 6'1 finally getting to my goals and cloasing on 200lbs and this happens.. You can just imagine the piss off.

    Here for ya bro! Holla if you need anything!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freestyle Child View Post

    Nice to hear that someone is in the same boat, isn't hypo supposed to make you gain weight?

    I was 190lbs at 6'1 finally getting to my goals and cloasing on 200lbs and this happens.. You can just imagine the piss off.

    Here for ya bro! Holla if you need anything!
    Yeah hypo usually means you gain weight faster.
    When my Dr seen my blood results he actually had me tested again to make sure because even he was wondering how I could be hypo.

    Yeah I was just gearing up to start my cycle too. Then bam!! Now I've learned that a simple test E cycle will block the thyroid meds so now I'm back to the drawing board trying to figure this crap out.

  12. #12
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    That's first I've heard that test will block thyroid meds. I take synthroid daily since I'm hypothyroid. I'll have to do some research on that.

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    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Get out lol I had a test e cycle 500mg a week planned out for when i've got this problem figured out... I am extremely disappointed to hear this.. Where did you find the info on this though???

  14. #14
    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Same here Everett I mean our body naturally produces testosterone I don't see of boosting these levels...through the roof...would do anything major to block a thyroid medication? I know deca may effect t3 levels

  15. #15
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    I'm trying to locate where I read it at. I now one member on here suggested it to me. And that's when I started to research it.
    I honestly hope I'm wrong so I can stop worrying.
    Hopefully somebody on here can give us some first hand advice about being Hypo and cycling.

  16. #16
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    Here is sort of what I was referring too
    I guess blocking was the wrong word.


    ANABOLIC STEROID USAGE AND THYROID SUPPRESSION
    Patrick Arnold

    [...]

    Bodybuilders who use large amounts of anabolic steroids often report lethargy as a side effect. Sleepiness, irritability, and foggy-headness are commonly reported by users of some of the more powerful anabolic steroids in large dosages. The cause of this lethargy has been the subject of debate in the performance-enhancement drug community, and the solution may be multifactorial. Published studies have given reason to suspect that thyroid hormone suppression may be one of these factors.

    THYROID HORMONES

    There are two major thyroid hormones, T4 and T3. T3 is considered the most active thyroid hormone, and its job is to act as a sort of ter regulator of every major aspect of metabolism- from protein thesis to carbohydrate and fat oxidation. T3 acts in general as a metabolic stimulator, and in addition to its influence on how the uses fuel for energy and tissue building, it also works to generate heat production (thermogenesis) via enhancement of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1) expression in the liver.

    The production of too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) and too little thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism) are both undesirable conditions. Hyperthyroidism leads to overstimulation of the nervous system (resulting in elevated heart rate and nervousness), as well loss of lean body mass due to protein catabolism. Hypothyroidism; the other hand, leads to depression and fatigue, as well as other symptoms such as joint pain, sensitivity to cold, and fat gain.

    ANABOLIC STEROIDS AND THYROID SUPPRESSION

    As I stated in my introduction, published studies have confirmed that anabolic steroid use can suppress thyroid hormone levels in the blood. It appears that this is not due so much to a decrease in the production of the main thyroid hormone (T4) in the thyroid gland, however. What really is the culprit of the suppression is debatable, as different studies have found different things. Two things are clear, though. The levels of total and free active thyroid hormone (T3) are decreased with anabolic steroid use, and T4 thyroid hormone-binding globulin levels are markedly elevated. However, free T4 appears to be unchanged, as does TSH, which is the hormone that your brain produces to stimulate thyroid hormone production in the thyroid gland. So what is happening is not entirely clear. It may be a combination of disrupted conversion of T4 to T3 and/or interference of bioavailable T4 levels by excessive T4 thyroid hormone-binding globulin. Whatever the case, levels of the active thyroid hormoneT3 can be suppressed by anabolic steroid use- particularly at higher dosages. Such suppression can interfere with maximum muscle growth from a cycle, as optimal protein synthesis activity is dependent upon ideal T3 levels in the body.

  17. #17
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    Being hypo made me go from 175# to 215#. Nothing changed in my diet. It's just an effect of an underactive thyroid. Thyroid effects everything in your body. My endo related it to a gas pedal on a car. How can muscle gains be made when every other bodily function is running at a snail's pace? And, when severe lethargy and depression hit, last thing you care about is gaining muscle.
    Re: trt and thyroid meds,,,I've been on synthroid for years and a gel for 16 months. No interactions have occurred.

  18. #18
    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DB1982 View Post
    Here is sort of what I was referring too
    I guess blocking was the wrong word.


    ANABOLIC STEROID USAGE AND THYROID SUPPRESSION
    Patrick Arnold

    [...]

    Bodybuilders who use large amounts of anabolic steroids often report lethargy as a side effect. Sleepiness, irritability, and foggy-headness are commonly reported by users of some of the more powerful anabolic steroids in large dosages. The cause of this lethargy has been the subject of debate in the performance-enhancement drug community, and the solution may be multifactorial. Published studies have given reason to suspect that thyroid hormone suppression may be one of these factors.

    THYROID HORMONES

    There are two major thyroid hormones, T4 and T3. T3 is considered the most active thyroid hormone, and its job is to act as a sort of ter regulator of every major aspect of metabolism- from protein thesis to carbohydrate and fat oxidation. T3 acts in general as a metabolic stimulator, and in addition to its influence on how the uses fuel for energy and tissue building, it also works to generate heat production (thermogenesis) via enhancement of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1) expression in the liver.

    The production of too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) and too little thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism) are both undesirable conditions. Hyperthyroidism leads to overstimulation of the nervous system (resulting in elevated heart rate and nervousness), as well loss of lean body mass due to protein catabolism. Hypothyroidism; the other hand, leads to depression and fatigue, as well as other symptoms such as joint pain, sensitivity to cold, and fat gain.

    ANABOLIC STEROIDS AND THYROID SUPPRESSION

    As I stated in my introduction, published studies have confirmed that anabolic steroid use can suppress thyroid hormone levels in the blood. It appears that this is not due so much to a decrease in the production of the main thyroid hormone (T4) in the thyroid gland, however. What really is the culprit of the suppression is debatable, as different studies have found different things. Two things are clear, though. The levels of total and free active thyroid hormone (T3) are decreased with anabolic steroid use, and T4 thyroid hormone-binding globulin levels are markedly elevated. However, free T4 appears to be unchanged, as does TSH, which is the hormone that your brain produces to stimulate thyroid hormone production in the thyroid gland. So what is happening is not entirely clear. It may be a combination of disrupted conversion of T4 to T3 and/or interference of bioavailable T4 levels by excessive T4 thyroid hormone-binding globulin. Whatever the case, levels of the active thyroid hormoneT3 can be suppressed by anabolic steroid use- particularly at higher dosages. Such suppression can interfere with maximum muscle growth from a cycle, as optimal protein synthesis activity is dependent upon ideal T3 levels in the body.
    Great info DD, as far as im concerned the suppression doesn't seem to be too catastrophic. Maybe a simple blood test during cycle if your feeling fatigued, depressed, or hypo symptoms and see what your T4 and T3 may be sitting at. Self adjust meds accordingly??

    What do you think...

    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty11 View Post
    Being hypo made me go from 175# to 215#. Nothing changed in my diet. It's just an effect of an underactive thyroid. Thyroid effects everything in your body. My endo related it to a gas pedal on a car. How can muscle gains be made when every other bodily function is running at a snail's pace? And, when severe lethargy and depression hit, last thing you care about is gaining muscle.
    Re: trt and thyroid meds,,,I've been on synthroid for years and a gel for 16 months. No interactions have occurred.
    That brings pain to my ears bro haha so not looking forward to this. I want to try and bulk hard and get my diet on key majorly but feel like it may be just a total waste of my time?

    How do you feel after you adjusted to meds?

  19. #19
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    Once my thyroid was removed( it takes about six months to completely disintegrate when you have radiation iodine pill), doc put me on my current dose and I was feeling/looking great after approx. 2 months. That was about 15 yrs ago and no problems have occured since.

    Everyone is different. My thyroid was completely fk'd. Yours may not be severe and you may feel much better without my drama. When doc adjusts dosage, it takes about six weeks to see if that dose is right for you. Good luck.

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    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty11 View Post
    Once my thyroid was removed( it takes about six months to completely disintegrate when you have radiation iodine pill), doc put me on my current dose and I was feeling/looking great after approx. 2 months. That was about 15 yrs ago and no problems have occured since.

    Everyone is different. My thyroid was completely fk'd. Yours may not be severe and you may feel much better without my drama. When doc adjusts dosage, it takes about six weeks to see if that dose is right for you. Good luck.
    Thanks a lot man, makes me still have hope lol do you think my thyroid would be what caused all the muscle loss?

  21. #21
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    Guessing...with a tsh of 15-20, that could very well be a major factor. Your body is moving/functioning like a turtle going uphill. Again, the little thyroid gland controls nearly every bodily function.

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    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty11 View Post
    Guessing...with a tsh of 15-20, that could very well be a major factor. Your body is moving/functioning like a turtle going uphill. Again, the little thyroid gland controls nearly every bodily function.
    Tell me about it. Cool bro ill keep you all posted with my upcoming blood test results and see where I stand.

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    Freestyle Child,

    I wanted to check:
    You wrote earlier that your Thyroid Peroxidase AB tested at greater than 1000.
    Is that correct?

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    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Deadlift Dog,

    Thyroid Peroxidase AB tested at >1000 with ref range of <35.
    Seems super high?

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    Yes it is.

    Thyroid peroxidase AB is the antibody produced by the immune system when it is targeting the thyroid.
    A high thyroid peroxidase AB score with high TSH is indicative of Hashimoto's disease.
    A high thyroid peroxidase AB score with low TSH is indicative of Graves disease.

    I am surprised that your endo didn't inform you that you have Hashimoto's.
    I also have Hashimoto's.

    Hashimoto's disease is when one's immune system attacks one's thyroid. The thyroid gradually weakens until it eventually will get destroyed altogether. From my understanding, there is no cure. However, treatment is fairly simple. Generally, one is prescribed synthetic T4 and TSH levels get tested. The level of meds will continue to be increased until the TSH level reaches the 1.0 to 2.0 level. (Side note: some people prefer T4 plus T3. Some people prefer dissected pigs thyroid called Armour. Some people recommend dietary changes to try to prevent flare ups of the immune system n the first place.)
    One can generally be prescribed 1mcg per pound of weight with usually no more than 200mcg needed. You are presently taking 25mcg. The full effects of the meds are not felt until about 4-6 weeks because of T4's long half life.

    Side effects of Hashimoto's are usually similar to hypothyroidism because one's thyroid gets weakened. Thus some of the sides are weight gain and muscle weakness.
    However, there are times when one's immune system relaxes its attack on the thyroid and in theses periods one can experience hyperthyroidism. Thus weight loss can occur.

    Many of the side effects of hypothyroidism are similar to low testosterone .

    I am currently fighting with my doctor to increase my dosage. I am currently on 62.5mcg and I cannot lean up. My TSH ranges from 3-5. Many doctor's will not treat Hashimoto's at all unless one's TSH is above 5.

    If I were you I would call your endo and confirm that you have Hashimoto's and ask what his line of attack is.

    Best of luck.

  26. #26
    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Deadlifting Dog View Post
    Yes it is.

    Thyroid peroxidase AB is the antibody produced by the immune system when it is targeting the thyroid.
    A high thyroid peroxidase AB score with high TSH is indicative of Hashimoto's disease.
    A high thyroid peroxidase AB score with low TSH is indicative of Graves disease.

    I am surprised that your endo didn't inform you that you have Hashimoto's.
    I also have Hashimoto's.

    Hashimoto's disease is when one's immune system attacks one's thyroid. The thyroid gradually weakens until it eventually will get destroyed altogether. From my understanding, there is no cure. However, treatment is fairly simple. Generally, one is prescribed synthetic T4 and TSH levels get tested. The level of meds will continue to be increased until the TSH level reaches the 1.0 to 2.0 level. (Side note: some people prefer T4 plus T3. Some people prefer dissected pigs thyroid called Armour. Some people recommend dietary changes to try to prevent flare ups of the immune system n the first place.)
    One can generally be prescribed 1mcg per pound of weight with usually no more than 200mcg needed. You are presently taking 25mcg. The full effects of the meds are not felt until about 4-6 weeks because of T4's long half life.

    Side effects of Hashimoto's are usually similar to hypothyroidism because one's thyroid gets weakened. Thus some of the sides are weight gain and muscle weakness.
    However, there are times when one's immune system relaxes its attack on the thyroid and in theses periods one can experience hyperthyroidism. Thus weight loss can occur.

    Many of the side effects of hypothyroidism are similar to low testosterone .

    I am currently fighting with my doctor to increase my dosage. I am currently on 62.5mcg and I cannot lean up. My TSH ranges from 3-5. Many doctor's will not treat Hashimoto's at all unless one's TSH is above 5.

    If I were you I would call your endo and confirm that you have Hashimoto's and ask what his line of attack is.

    Best of luck.
    Thanks a lot man that gave me a way better understanding. I just messaged my endo and asked her to confirm with me she will most likely get back to me in a couple of days. I'm surprised that she did not bring it to my attention or just let me know that it was high, as well as my estrogen people have been saying its a little high?

    Would you by chance know why checking my prolactin would benefit me or give me details about anything that could be wrong?

    Grind Hard. Stay Humble.
    Freestyle Child

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    Hold on a minute, bucko....are you saying that your doc is an endo, you have a tsh of 15-20, and she said NOTHING to you about this??? If this is true, this is a very incompetant endo. Mine talks/warns me when it nears 4. Something's not quite right here.

    Btw, great explanation, Dog!

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    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty11 View Post
    Hold on a minute, bucko....are you saying that your doc is an endo, you have a tsh of 15-20, and she said NOTHING to you about this??? If this is true, this is a very incompetant endo. Mine talks/warns me when it nears 4. Something's not quite right here.

    Btw, great explanation, Dog!
    Nah man she didn't say anything. She also said I was fine when i went in and then she reviewed my blood work and said "oh, your thyroid is out" nearly missing that as well.

    She had to research natural desiccated thyroid as I guess she wasn't educated on it, and came back with an answer of it "Not being stable enough"....

    I think it might be in my best interests to get referred to another endo? Thoughts?

    GH.SH.
    Freestyle Child

  29. #29
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    A lot of younger docs object to natural dessicated thyroid because they have basically learned to be physicians without it, and their only experience are the comments thrown out there by various endocrinology associations, for most of which there is no evidence.

    Physicians used to treat any hypo thyroid disorder (such as your Hashimoto's thyroiditis) with dessicated pig thyroid, which contains thyroid hormones T4, T3, T2 and T1 until pharmaceutical companies started creating synthetic T4, and them in their marketing talked a lot about the dangers of too much T3 (it's true too much T3 is bad, the same as any substance). So the younger generation of doctors has literally never used anything but synthetic T4 and only very rarely will docs prescribe synthetic T4 along with synthetic T3.

    Now, to be fair, lots of people do fine on the synthetic T4 you are on - and it will take some time to ramp up your dose and get you regulated to the proper amount and that is unfortunately unavoidable - if they give you too much too quickly you could go hyper which is far more dangerous than being hypo. As Phaedo said, you seem to have a decent T4 to T3 conversion rate, so perhaps T4 will be fine for you. My T3 was very low, so my doc started me straight on dessicated thyroid (I take a drug called Erfa thyroid, made in Belgium for the Canadian company, Erfa).

    It's not impressive to be seeing an endo whose default position is that everyone who comes to see them is fine, and almost glossed over a hugely inflated TSH. People like that (in my view) think most patients are psychosomatic and need antidepressants. They should have mentioned that you have a lot of auto antibodies and told you what the condition is called, etc. I have heard that some Hashi's patients do very well on an autoimmune diet - you would have to google it as I have just heard it in newsgroups and since I don't have antibodies, I never looked into it. But in a perfect world, you would have a doc that tells you about the condition, the medicine and any other supportive things that are not medicine (like diet) that could possibly help. That is not too much to ask.

    If you decide to find another endo, you might consider getting in touch with the Erfa people (ERFA - Home Page) as they are very helpful. They have helped me find which chemists in my part of the world stock their product, and if you wanted to know which endos in Canada prescribe it with some frequency, they might help with that. At least then if it turned out that T4 alone was not getting you the result you needed, you would know that the doc you were seeing would be willing to consider natural thyroid.

    This page also has a listing of docs in Canada that people who have had trouble getting their thyroid treated have compiled:
    Canada Top Doctors -- Best Thyroid Doctors, Endocrinologists, Thyroidologists, Practitioners and Experts in the World as Nominated by Patients, from Mary Shomon

  30. #30
    wndyctyjsn is offline New Member
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    Excellent post angel.


    I am hypo and was on levoxyl max dose and still felt like crap. New doc has me on armour and weening me off levoxyl. Feel alot better already. The website stop the thyroid madness will help you greatly, look it up....has a wealth of info including how to locate a good doctor.

    I have been killing myself to stay trim and built in the gym for years, now I can be alot less intense and actually obtain a solid 10lb cut if I want to. Good luck!

  31. #31
    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    ON, Canada
    Posts
    88
    Wow Angel, amazing post. Full on information I need to know!

    I'm due for more blood work soon (week of june 17th) to test my thyroid hormones and anti-bodies. If Phaedo as well as you are saying that my T4 to T3 conversion is pretty good then I am going to wait and see what these results tell me.

    As far as finding another doctor, I have mentioned it to some family members and have only got the "Doctors know what their doing, you don't" answer... Which is totally expected out of the older generation because I don't think they understand the lack of knowledge doctor's and specialists hold these days. Saying that I feel like i'm holding a 'know it all' type attitude? Everyone is recommending I find another endocrinologist on the boards and that I think I will do as she didn't mention anything to me about my problem and issues,etc, and just immediately started me on my meds leaving me wondering wtf is going on...

    I'm going to book a appointment with my general family doctor and get him to order me blood tests for estrogen, prolactin, and maybe even my testosterone again?? Any others you guys/girls may think of that could be of importance to me? Please share!

    Thanks a lot

  32. #32
    Freestyle Child is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    ON, Canada
    Posts
    88
    Quick update, booking an appointment with my doctor to ask for the following tests:

    - Full iron panel, Ferritin w/ TIBC
    - Salivary Cortisol Test
    - Estradiol (To see if it has lowered from hearing that it was high)
    - T4, T3, RT3, FT3


    As well have more blood work on the week of June 17th for my thyroid hormones again.

    Thanks, Grind hard Stay humble.
    Freestyle Child

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