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  1. #1
    TheJuicer is offline Member
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    I think my diet sucks

    Ok tell me what you think?

    6 a.m. Raisin Bran
    9 a.m. 4 egg whites in a bun
    2 6 oz. orange juices
    12 a.m. 1 chicken breast with lettuce and a tomato on bun
    3 p.m. 1 chicken breast with lettuce and tomato .. pack of crackers
    6 p.m. 1 can of tuna 2 apples
    9 p.m. 40g of whey GNC protein

    I am also on AS 250 sus and Deca 300..1 cc of each and one a week Mon and Fri.

    My gains are not bad but the fat around my waist sucks..I know that AS doesnt make you loose weight but I dont want to get fat either. What should I do to loose the damn love handles! HELP!!
    Thanx BROS

  2. #2
    buffmike is offline Junior Member
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    Whaoh, it can use some help but hey, no diet is perfect. What is your weight, bodyfat, and age? I'll help you modify if you need. Send me a private message with what you want and I can help you with a really good diet based on your measurements. Anyway, here are my basic modifications.

    6 a.m. -(No raisin bran...high glycemic index, processed cereals arent the best) 2 servings of oatmeal (cinnamon and sweetner on it), 1 egg, 4-7 egg whites, glass of skim milk
    9 a.m. half pound of turkey, 3 slices of wheat bread, salad or veggies
    12 a.m. 2 chicken breast, salad or veggies, 1 serving of brown or wild rice
    3 p.m. 50 g's of weigh, 1 apple
    6 p.m. 1 can of tuna , 2 servings of oatmeal or (50 g's of a good carb -rice, wheat pasta, or 2 yams)
    9 p.m. 40g of whey GNC protein, 1 serving of natural pbutter


    Drink plenty of water. Try to have a protein shake (30-40g's of protein) immediatly after your workout. Wait it out an hour, then have your solid food meal. you may need more food than this based on your weight and bodyfat.

  3. #3
    BIG TEXAN's Avatar
    BIG TEXAN is offline Respected Member
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    Gonna need your stats to help you out more.

  4. #4
    TheJuicer is offline Member
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    OK..I am 5'10 210 and about 20-25% BF. I have been fighting it all my life. It just seems when I gain mass I put on soooo much extra fat..but when I cut my carbs a little I dont gain in the gym anymore. What do you think.

  5. #5
    buffmike is offline Junior Member
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    Wow that was my case for a while actually. Try a maintenance diet in where you zig zag your carbs and calories daily. Then in 3 months, evaluate the gains you made and either mass from there or get into a cutting type of diet (that doesnt have to mean EXTREMELY low carb).
    Based on your stats your maintenance calories would be 3400 calories a day. Strictly count your calories daily and your calories from protein, carbs, and fat. You should rotate days in which you eat 3600 cals a day and 3000 cals a day, meaning that 3 days a week, eat 3600 cals a day (400 g's carbs, 350g's protein, and 65 gs of fat). On the other 4 days, eat about 400 calories below maintenance (3000). You would now aim for 300g's of carbs, 300, 65 g's of fat. Follow this for a few months, make sure to make modifications as you go along.
    For carbs aim for these foods-oats, cream of wheat, all natural oat bran (not bran flakes!!!), whole grain breads (have only once a day), fruit(apples, pears, oranges--1 serving a day), veggies(tons), yams, potatoes (post workout only), pasta (post workout only), wild rice, brown rice
    Proteins-steak, seafoods, salmons (just make sure your fat measure out, it tends to be high in GOOOD fat), eggs, egg whites, chicken, tuna, milk, fat free cheese, fat free cottage cheese
    Fats-Peanut butter (natural), walnuts, peanuts, almonds, olive oil, flax

    Good luck,,,,I hope this helped....again, email me with anymore questions

  6. #6
    abstrack's Avatar
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    IMHO- dont worry about counting your calories bro!! seriously focus on your meal timing and getting your macros down for each individual meal. I am going to copy and paste a post about the calories issue so you can see what I am saying.

    --And yes, your assumption on your siet is correct. ditch the milk bro.

    Also, focus on a goal--either cut your body fat down and maintain your muscle and try to gain some lean mass along the way or bulk while not putting on a ton a fat and put on lean mass.

    I will find the post on calories, brb!

  7. #7
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    By the Man himself~~

    IT'S TRADITIONAL THINKING!

    IF YOU WERE ALLOWED 3000 CALORIES A DAY, AND WOULD STILL LOSE WEIGHT EATING THAT AMOUNT, LET'S TRY SOMETHING. SAY U EAT 6 TIMES THAT DAY, AND EACH MEAL IS 400 CALORIES......YOU'D ONLY EAT 2400 THAT DAY, AND YOU COULD HAVE AS MUCH AS 3000 AND STILL LOSE WEIGHT RIGHT. K, WHAT IF WE MAKE ALL THOSE MEALS SOMETHING LIKE PIZZA, OR ANY HI GI FOOD AND FAT TOGETHER. JUST BECAUSE YOUR CALORIE TOTAL AT THE END OF THE DAY WILL BE LOWER THAN YOU EVEN TARGETED, DO U NOT THINK U WILL BE STORING FAT FROM THOSE KIND OF FOOD CHOICES? BET YOUR SWEATY BUTT CRACK YOU WILL! IT'S NOT MERELY TOTAL CALORIES AT THE "END OF THE DAY", IT'S THE MACROS AT EACH MEAL AND WHAT THOSE MEALS ARE AIMED TO ACCOMPLISH. "BUT SWOLECAT, IF I BURN 3000 A DAY AND ONLY EAT 2400, I HAVE TO LOSE WEIGHT RIGHT?" WELL, NO.....U COULD VERY WELL LOSE MUSCLE TOO, ESPECIALLY SINCE THOSE POOR FOOD CHOICES WOULD DO LITTLE FOR A POSITIVE NITROGEN BALANCE AND UTILIZING PROTEIN FOR MUSCLE GROWTH. YOU ALSO COULD HAVE EACH MEAL PROPORTIONED INCORRECTLY SO YOU AREN'T GOING TO LOSE WEIGHT AND YOU AREN'T GOING TO SUPPORT MUSCLE GROWTH, SOMETHING I HAVE EXPERIMENTED WITH, BOT WITH MY BODY AND OTHER LOCALS YEARS AGO BEFORE MAKING MY PROGRAMS OFFICIAL. I ALSO HAVE A PROBLEM LOOKING AT THE CONCEPT OF "HOW MANY CALORIES EACH DAY", AS I DON'T BELIEVE IN CUT-OFF TIMES. FAT LOSS AND MUSCULAR GROWTH DO NOT HAVE CUT-OFF TIMES. AS WELL, WE ALL HAVE DIFFERENT SCHEDULES AND LIFESTYLES........AN HOUR IS AN HOUR, YES, BUT THAT'S AS FAR AS I TAKE IT. IT'S THIS MACRONUTRIENT PER-MEAL THINKING THAT ALLOWS YOU TO MAKE BETTER GAINS, SEE WHAT MISTAKES YOU MAKE AND BE ABLE TO IDENTIFY THEM EASIER, AND BE ABLE TO MAKE THE CHANGES IMMEDIATELY IN ORDER TO SAVE VALUABLE TIME. DON'T LOOK AT IT FROM A DAILY TOTAL STANDPOINT, LOOK AT IT FROM AN HOUR TO HOUR STANDPOINT, GOING BY ACTIVITY, RECOVERY NEEDS, THINGS THAT WILL HALT GROWTH/FAT LOSS, ETC.

    FOOD CHOICES AS TO WHEN, WITH WHAT, IN WHAT AMOUNT, WHY, ETC. ALL PLAY A BIGGER PART IN YOUR BODY TRANSFORMATION JOURNEY THAN DO COUNTING CALORIES. I AM NOT SAYING YOU CAN EAT 1000 OVER MAINTENANCE AND LOSE WEIGHT, (U CAN GET DAMN CLOSE IF YOU STRATEGICALLY PLAN THIS THOUGH AND NOT THINK ON A 24 HOUR CLOCK), BUT YOU GET MY IDEA. U CANNOT DIET WITH THE WRONG MACROS AND WORRY ABOUT TOTAL CALORIES ONLY THINKING THAT IS WHAT MATTERS. THINK LIKE AN ANIMAL BASICALLY........WHAT ACTIVITY ARE YOU GOING TO DO, WHAT HAVE YOU JUST DONE, WHAT ENERGY (FOODS) ARE BEST AT THESE TIMES TO ACCOMPLISH THESE GOALS?

    THERE IS A LOT MORE TO THIS, BUT THIS IS ONE REASON YOU NEVER SEE A TOTAL CALORIE COUNT ON AN SGX/SUP PROGRAM. IF YOU WERE TO BREAK IT DOWN, THE AMOUNTS WOULD BE FAR DIFFERENT THAN THE "TRADITIONAL" CALORIE AMOUNTS YOU WOULD ARRIVE AT USING THOSE TRADITIONAL METHODS, AND THERE IS A GOOD REASON FOR THAT. MY PROGRAMS ARE DESIGNED THROUGH MY FORMULA FOR MACROS, AND THOSE WERE ARRIVED UPON BY USING BODYWEIGHT, BUT ALL OF THE OTHER INTRICACIES I TAKE INTO ACCOUNT LIKE CARDIO, WEIGHTS, LIMITATIONS, ETC., MAKE IT EASIER TO TARGET THE INDIVIDUALS MACRO NEEDS THAN TO JUST SAY, "OH A 200 LB PERSON NEEDS 2200 CALORIES TO DIET." THEN BREAK DOWN HOW MUCH PROTEIN/FAT/CARBS/ETC........THAT IS A START, BUT WHAT HAPPENS IF THOSE MACROS ARE AT THE WRONG PLACE, WRONG TIME, WRONG AMOUNT TO ACHIEVE WHAT COULD BE OPTIMAL RESULTS?

    SORRY, I'M ON A RANT, BUT PRETTY SOON THIS IDEA WILL BE EXPLAINED MORE IN DEPTH BY ME. UNTIL THEN, IT WILL CONTINUE TO FUEL THE PROGRAMS I MAKE AND CONTINUE TO GET PEOPLE IN THE BEST SHAPE THEY HAVE EVER BEEN.

    YES, MY CAPS LOCK WERE ON THE WHOLE TIME, VERY SORRY BUT I AIN'T WRITING THIS AGAIN. IT'S HARD ENOUGH TO GET ACROSS IN TYPING, SO I HOPE THIS WAS KIND OF CLEAR! LOL.......

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    Last edited by SwoleCat on Sat Mar 08, 2003 3:46 am, edited 1 time in totalBack to top

  8. #8
    abstrack's Avatar
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    ther eis one more post I think you might find interesting, let me find it

  9. #9
    abstrack's Avatar
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    Thumbs up here we go again:D:

    Joined: 12 Apr 2003
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    Posted: Fri Apr 18, 2003 6:27 pm__ _Post subject: Swole!!! Article and references to
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    back you up!!!

    I haven't signed up with SC yet, but have been doing research on macronutrient timing....here's an article to back him up with references to journals....

    Lonnie M. Lowery, Ph.D. and Elzi Volk, M.S.

    Tick, tick, tick...

    Does it matter when you eat? Can you take advantage of particularly anabolic times throughout the day or avoid those periods when you're more likely to lay down body fat? You may be surprised to hear that the answer is YES!

    What you eat and when you consume it matters a lot. By focusing upon different macronutrients (proteins, carbs, fats) as the day progresses, you just might be able to have fuller-looking muscles and a smaller gut (or butt). Think we're full of it? We’ll review 10 facts in this article and its successor, starting with these five...

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    FACT 1:
    A person has about two-three hours to take advantage of the "post workout nutrient window"

    FACT 2:
    Eating protein as well as carbohydrate shortly after exercise increases (muscle) protein synthesis and slows its degradation.

    FACT 3:
    Glucose tolerance worsens as the day progresses

    FACT 4:
    The body becomes catabolic during sleep, in part due to the extended fasting.

    FACT 5:
    Proteins with faster digestion are more anabolic.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Let's see how we can take advantage of these important findings, shall we?



    Fact 1: Post-workout nutrient window.

    First, let's address the post-workout nutrient window. It used to be called the "post-workout carbohydrate window", but recent research has altered that view a bit. Basically, for a period of 1-3 hours after exercise, muscles are "greedy" for carbohydrates for reasons involving intracellular enzymes and glucose transporters. Consuming 0.7 to 1.6 g/ kg of total body weight (0.3-0.73 g/ lb TBW), or roughly 50-100 grams,6, 8,15 of rapidly digested and absorbed (high glycemic index) carbs during this window of opportunity is critical if you want to keep your muscles optimized for recovery and full looking. Keeping glycogen levels (formed from dietary carbs) high also appears to prevent (muscle) tissue breakdown, or “catabolism”.13

    Training intensely, especially if you use negatives (eccentric contractions), makes it even more important to take advantage of the post-workout nutrient window. Why? Because the resulting muscle damage may hurt your muscles' ability to "soak up" the carbs after several hours pass and soreness sets in. (More on this in Part 2.) You want to refill muscle glycogen before this occurs which means taking in carbs as soon as possible after training.6

    It’s generally a good idea to get plenty of carbs in right after training - even if you're avoiding them the rest of the day!15 In fact, additional small feedings of carbs after training may enhance repletion of glycogen in muscle tissue.3



    Fact 2: Protein is important, too.

    Although carbs were always thought to be 'top dog' for recovery, recent research shows that protein is just as important. New data from the renown Mark Tarnopolsky’s group at McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, reveals that increasing amino acid availability along with the circulating glucose can improve protein accretion (“non-oxidative leucine disposal”) following training.17 This was supported by data from Lonnie's "other lab" at Kent, the Applied Physiology Laboratory. It was here that colleague Phil Appicelli (see CreaRibose Research update) found similar results. And still more data agrees.2,16 All these data confirm the benefits of combining protein with one’s carbs.

    In fact, protein alone is important for recovery. The ingestion of either 40 g mixed amino acids (17 different ones) or essential amino acids (10 different ones) about three hours post-exercise have been shown to change the net protein degradation experienced by weight trainers to net protein synthesis.18

    Based on available data, you should eat perhaps 25-50 g of protein with your post-workout carbs. Since protein synthesis continues and peaks at about 24-36 hours after training,14 it's important to keep a steady supply of amino acids coming into your system by having small amounts of protein with each meal. Also, some of the recent research indicates that ingesting some protein before training may enhance protein synthesis afterward.19 Overall, it’s becoming pretty clear that eating protein with your carbs before, during, and after exercise is the ticket to increased muscle mass.



    Fact 3: Glucose tolerance is better earlier in the day.

    Your body's ability to handle dietary carbohydrate, in terms of keeping blood glucose within (low-to-mid) normal levels, fluctuates throughout the day. Of course, whatever the type of carbohydrate you eat, increased blood glucose is the result. Humans don’t have blood starch, fructose, or sucrose per se. These carbohydrates are digested (hydrolyzed) and absorbed as glucose. The balance of glucose supply and glucose utilization tightly controls normal levels of blood glucose, and insulin plays a key role in this process. [See graph.] Insulin inhibits glucose production/ release by the liver (where it is stored and manufactured) and stimulates glucose uptake by insulin sensitive tissues, such as muscle and adipose (body fat) tissues. However, just as in many of our hormone patterns, 24-hour variations occur in the overall glucose control system.

    Many studies have shown that the blood glucose response to oral glucose and mixed meals (proteins, various carbs and fats) varies according to the time of day. Glucose levels are higher in the late afternoon and into the first half of the night. Some studies have suggested that these effects may be greater as we age, and are more prevalent in women than men. Researchers have gone so far as to described evening glucose tolerance in normal individuals as equivalent to mild diabetes!9 Wow!

    Several mechanisms may explain the diurnal (time of day) variation in glucose tolerance. Insulin sensitivity is generally higher (better) in the morning and lower in the evening.12 Tissues like muscle appear to decrease their ability to take-up glucose later in the day.11 These morning-to-evening differences in glucose tolerance may possibly be due to changes in hormones and variations in the nervous system.20

    As a consequence, tolerance to carbohydrate-rich meals declines as the day progresses. Eating low fat carb foods earlier in the day7 and reducing the carb content in meals as the day progresses may help to keep blood glucose better modulated. Over time, reduced body fat and fewer health problems (e.g. Syndrome X) may be the outcome. More research is necessary and of course kcal intake throughout the day is a consideration, but the literature is suggestive that evening carb reduction may be beneficial.



    Fact 4: Nighttime shake can prevent muscle breakdown.

    Each of us typically sleeps for a period of 6 to 9 hours, during which time our bodies enter the fasted state (because of the lack of food). Our bodies must therefore intervene to maintain stable glucose levels during this time. That glucose can come from various sources, depending on glycogen stores in several tissues: primarily glycogen stored in the liver. Hepatic (liver) cells have an enzyme called glucose-6-phosphatase that allows them to donate their glycogen/ glucose to keep blood glucose normal – and you alive – as you snooze for eight hours. As hepatic glycogen becomes depleted throughout the night, the body can start breaking down protein to make more glucose. Cortisol, which breaks down muscle tissue, and insulin, which isn’t around (much) to preserve it at this time, play important roles here.

    By the way, if you train first thing in the morning without eating, reduced levels of liver glycogen may cause increased protein breakdown, so that your body can maintain blood glucose. Cortisol levels are high upon waking as it is.22 If you train first thing and your goal is maintained/ increased muscle mass, it's best to eat something (a small amount of carbs and protein) to avoid this. Eating before early morning exercise, conversely, could dampen fat loss. Thus, it depends on your goals.

    If training before bedtime, a nighttime shake of mixed protein sources and some carbs should help prevent catabolism of muscle and enhance recovery while sleeping. The effects of exercise are likely to supersede the evening difficulties with glucose tolerance mentioned earlier. Admittedly, this is largely speculative at this point. Preventing sleep/ fasting-induced catabolism via dietary means is, in any case, an often-overlooked concept. Some athletes even go so far as to set an alarm and consume a late-night protein shake.



    Fact 5: Easily digestible proteins are more anabolic.

    Dietary protein digestion/ absorption rate can also affect protein deposition in the body, and thus muscle growth. Proteins that are rapidly digestible, such as whey, replenish the amino acid pool in the body quickly, supplying all the building blocks required for protein synthesis.5 This makes whey ideal for recovery and growth in your post-workout shake, to get amino acids to the just-worked muscles as soon as possible.

    At this point, we’ve reviewed a number of issues emphasizing the critical timing of nutrient intake. As Dr. Peter Lemon notes in the recent text, Sports Supplements1: “Areas that need to be clarified involve not only which nutrients/ compounds affect the anabolic response induced by strength exercise, but also the best timing of intake relative to strength exercise…” Check back next month to learn more details on the five nutrient timing concepts discussed here as well as five more that round out our discussion.





    The clock is still ticking. Last time we cited some fascinating and applicable research on how to take advantage of particularly anabolic times throughout the day. We also pointed out periods and dietary situations in which you are at greater risk of muscle loss and fat gain. Ready for more? Let's review the final five facts on our nutrient timing “top ten”...

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    FACT 6:
    Proteins with slower digestion are anti-catabolic.

    FACT 7:
    Carbohydrates that raise blood glucose rapidly (high glycemic index) are best immediately post-exercise.

    FACT 8:
    Sore, damaged muscles resist glucose uptake.

    FACT 9:
    Carbohydrates may blunt the GH response to exercise, as fat does.

    FACT 10:
    Carbohydrates eaten before/ during training can reduce muscle catabolism but also blunt lipolysis (fat breakdown).

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Fact 6: “Slower” proteins inhibit protein breakdown.

    Proteins that digest/ absorb more slowly, such as casein and most other dietary proteins, provide the body with amino acids gradually, over a longer period of time. One study showed that whole body protein breakdown was inhibited more (for several hours) after ingesting casein, but whole body protein synthesis was stimulated to a lesser degree than with ingestion of whey protein.(Dangin) This may make casein (and other dietary proteins) a better choice for other times during the day, to provide the body with a steady supply of amino acids.



    Fact 7: High-glycemic carbs are best for post-exercise.

    Considering the post-workout window of opportunity summarized in Fact 1, the best carbs to ingest right after training are those that are quickly digestible. High glycemic index (GI) carbs, such as glucose, glucose polymers or sucrose, are much more effective at stimulating glycogen resynthesis in the muscle tissue than fructose and other low-glycemic sources of carbs.(Ivy) The slower digestion and absorption of low-GI carbs delay the availability of glucose to the just worked muscle tissue.(Burke)


    Fact 8: Muscle damage can blunt glucose uptake.

    While the eccentric (lowering) portion of weight training exercises appears to be associated with muscle growth, too much could actually hinder growth. High intensity weight lifting that results in significant amounts of damage can reduce glucose uptake into the muscle and blunt glycogen accumulation. Data from the Human Performance Lab at Ball State University showed that glycogen levels were the same at 6 hours in the control and the exercised muscles of eccentrically trained men. (Widrick) However, at 24 and 72 hours, the eccentrically trained muscles contained significantly less glycogen than the control muscles. This fact is supported by data from the Human Nutrition Lab at Kent State. These data suggest that the athletes who get more sore and damaged from eccentric training (as assessed by higher creatine kinase spillage into the blood) are the ones who secrete more insulin to deal with an oral glucose tolerance test.(Sexton and Lowery) This is presumably a result of (relatively) glucose intolerant damaged muscles. Newer data from this lab also suggests that fasting insulin concentrations tend to be slightly higher in sore athletes - again revealing some difficulty handling dietary carbohydrate.

    As mentioned, an emphasis on eccentric exercise often results in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), as well as causing damage to the muscle cell membrane. This damage alters glucose uptake into the muscle, which affects glycogen resynthesis. The time course of reduced muscle glycogen recompensation parallels that of the development of DOMS. In addition to cell membrane damage, the inflammatory response that accompanies soreness may also impair insulin binding. Furthermore, Doyle et al. of the Exercise Physiology Lab at Ohio State University showed a decrease in the enzyme, glycogen synthase, in eccentrically trained muscles compared to the concentrically trained.(Doyle) This enzyme is involved in synthesis of glycogen from glucose, and thus likely contributes to the reduction in glycogen replenishment.

    Therefore, all of these effects of eccentric induced muscle damage may lead to impaired glucose uptake and glycogen resynthesis, which can harm both recovery and growth following training. If you train to the point of intense soreness in an effort to induce serious growth, allow a 5-7 day recovery period and perhaps reduce carb intake during periods of whole-body DOMS.



    Fact 9: Carbs may blunt the GH response; fat does.

    Although the scientific literature is equivocal and often misinterpreted, there may be some suppression of GH release when carbohydrate is consumed (Davies, Giustina, Jenkins) even prior to/ during exercise. (Bonen) Yet this isn't always found. (Cappon) Timing is critical, as a carb (and protein) meal could conceivably lead to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) 60-90 minutes after ingestion and end up raising GH levels. This has, in fact, been demonstrated post-exercise. This scenario, where blood sugar is purposely driven downwards during an “insulin overshoot” would not be advisable immediately prior to training. It could cause fatigue. And lastly, a high fat pre-exercise meal has been shown to drop GH release by over 50% (Cappon), so those looking for GH release may want to avoid this.

    Thus, if one is desirous of maximal somaotropin (GH) stimulation via exercise, especially to garner its lipolytic (fat burning) effects, it may be best to avoid carbohydrate for about two hours beforehand. Again, the literature is not 100% on this issue so some trainers may opt for the sense of fullness and energy that a light meal can bring, before heading to the gym.



    Fact 10: Carbs will spare muscle but also spare fat.

    Just as consuming nutrients, such as carbs or protein, can alter hormone concentrations at any time, they also influence the hormonal response to exercise. Exercise uses a mixture of fuel, such as stored glycogen, some blood glucose, and fat. When glycogen and blood glucose are lowered, the body relies more on fat for fuel and vice versa. It seems intuitive that the body would readily dip into it’s fat reserves when there is little else to “burn” metabolically. It also makes sense that the body would shy away from carbohydrate as a metabolic fuel when there is little to spare. Many exercisers put this knowledge to work, exercising fasted, upon rising in an attempt to enhance the total grams of fat lost.

    But what if you’re already lean? What if your goal is to gain sheer weight with little regard for fat loss? This is a valid desire of many ectomorphic (thin) “hard gainers”. In this case, one’s strategy is nearly opposite to the one described above. Hard gainers care little that carb intake blunts lipolysis. The truth is, dietary carb (and protein) consumption prior to, during, and after exercise is generally good for muscle gain. Purposely timing carb intake around one’s training bout elevates blood glucose and insulin concentrations while reducing cortisol and interleukin-6, all of which help prevent muscle breakdown. (Deuster, Mitchel, Murray, Nieman)

    Manipulating the ingestion of carbs in relation to exercise, therefore, is critical to reach one’s goals whether they are to lean out or bulk up. Perhaps the best approach is to vary the strategy throughout the year. Many athletes undertake a “mass building phase” in the Fall but switch to a “cutting phase” in Spring/ Summer.

    So there you have it, a short but well-referenced treatise on nutrient timing. Now it’s time to put this new understanding to work and break out of that plateau in your physique development. Good luck.



    References and Additional Reading

    Antonio, J. and Stout, J. Sports Supplements. Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 2001.

    Biolo G, Tipton KD, Klein S, Wolfe RR. An abundant supply of amino acids enchances the metabolic effect of exercise on muscle protein. Am J Physiol 1997; 273(36):E122.

    Bonen, A., et al. Hormonal responses during intense exercise preceded by glucose ingestion.Can J Appl Sport Sci 1980 Jun;5(2):85-90.

    Burke LM, Collier GR, Davis PG, et al. Muscle glycogen storage after prolonged exercise: effect of the frequency of carbohydrate feedings. Am J Clin Nutr 1996; 64:115.

    Cappon, J., et al. Acute effects of high fat and high glucose meals on the growth hormone response to exercise. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1993 Jun;76(6):1418-22.

    Chandler RM, Byrne HK, Ivy JL, et al. Dietary supplements affect the anabolic hormones after weight training exercise. J Appl Physiol 1994; 76(2):839.

    Dangin M, Boirie Y, Garcia-Rodenas C, et al. The digestion rate of protein is an independent regulating factor of postprandial protein retention. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2001;280(2):E340.

    Davies, R., et al. Oral glucose inhibits growth hormone secretion induced by human pancreatic growth hormone releasing factor 1-44 in normal man. Clin Endocrinol 21(4) (1984 Oct): 477-81.

    Doyle JA, Sherman WM, Strauss RL. Effects of eccentric and concentric exercise on muscle glycogen replenishment. J Appl Physiol 1993; 74(4A):1848-1855.

    Deuster, P., et al. Hormonal responses to ingesting water or a carbohydrate beverage during a 2 h run. Med Sci Sports Exerc. Jan;24(1):72-9,1992.

    Frape, D., et al. Effect of breakfast fat content on glucose tolerance and risk factors of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Br J Nutr 1998 Oct;80(4):323-31.

    Friedman, J. et al. Regulation of glycogen resynthesis following exercise. Dietary considerations. Sports Med 1991; 11(4):232-43.

    Giustina, A., et al. Pathophysiology of the Neuroregulation of Growth Hormone Secretion in Experimental Animals and the Human. Endocrine Reviews 19 (6): 717-797.

    Grabner, W., et al. Diurnal variation of glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in man. Klin Wochenschr 1975 Aug 15;53(16):773-8.

    Ivy JL. Muscle glycogen synthesis before and after exercise. Sports Med 1991; 11(1):6.

    Jenkins, D., et al. Metabolic effects of reducing rate of glucose ingestion by single bolus versus continuous sipping. Diabetes 39(7) (1990 Jul): 775-81.

    JVerrillo A, De Teresa A, Martino C, et al. Differential roles of splanchnic and peripheral tissues in determining diurnal fluctuation of glucose tolerance. Am J Physiol 1989; 257(4 pt 1):E459.

    Lee A, Ader M, Bray GA, Bergman RN. Diurnal variation in glucose tolerance. Cyclic suppression of insulin action and insulin secretion in normal-weight, but not obese, subjects. Diabetes 1992; 41(6):742.

    Lemon PW, Mullin. Effect of initial muscle glycogen levels on protein catabolism during exercise. JP. J Appl Physiol 1980;48(4):624-9.

    MacDougall JD, Gibala MJ, Tarnopolsky MA, et al. The time course for elevated muscle protein synthesis following heavy resistance exercise. Can J Appl Physiol 1995; 20(45):480.

    Mitchell, J., et al. Influence of carbohydrate ingestion on counterregulatory hormones during prolonged exercise. Int J Sports Med. Feb;11(1):33-6, 1990.
    Murray, R., et al. Responses to varying rates of carbohydrate ingestion during exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. Jun;23(6):713-8,1991.
    Nieman DC, Influence of mode and carbohydrate on the cytokine response to heavy exertion. Med Sci Sports Exerc May;30(5):671-678, 1998.
    Pascoe DD, Costill DL, Fink WJ, et al. Glycogen resynthesis in skeletal muscle following resistive exercise. Med Sci Sports Exer 1993; 25(3):349.

    Rassmussen, B., et al. An oral essential amino acid-carbohydrate supplement enhances muscle protein anabolism after resistance exercise. J Appl Physiol 2000; 88: 386.

    Roy, B. et al. Macronutrient intake and whole body protein metabolism following resistance exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2000; 32(:1412.

    Sexton, T. and Lowery, L. (2001). Oh J Sci (Medicine and Biology), 101 (1): 13.

    Tipton, K., Ferrando, A., Phillips, S., et al. Postexercise net protein synthesis in human muscle from orally administered amino acids. Am J Physiol 1999; 276 (Endcrinol Metab):E628.

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    Williams, R. Textbook of Clinical Endocrinology. 1974. WB Saunders Co.: Philadelphia.Back to top

  10. #10
    rambo's Avatar
    rambo is offline The Lord God
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    Nice article, heads up abstrack- gonna have to look into the pre-workout meal that i usually have, as it is rich in EFA's, be interesting to know if it does indeed hinder a GH response.

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    buffmike is offline Junior Member
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    Of course food choice is the biggest and most important part of a diet, BUT, so is counting calories. Where do you think calories come from? - protein, carbs, and fat. You must get all these cals from great food sources. In terms on the zig zag diet, I'm a firm believer in it. Check out www.drsquat.com. Go to the articles section and scroll down to the article entitled Zig Zag Diet. It has many great points in there, especially if you plan on staying in shape all year around. I personally feel following this is great, especially if you are not competing. Following a "get huge diet" usually leads to excess fat stores in addition to the muscle you gain, and a cutting diet usually leads to a decrease in muscle mass in addition to the loss of fat. That is where calorie counting becomes key. So check it out and tell me what you think.

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    TheJuicer is offline Member
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    Wooww..this is a lot to take in..It is a real science that I'm sure I will screw up.. Can anyone one give me a few examples of a day on one of these perfect diets. Buffmike I did your diet today..I like it. THANX!!

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by buffmike
    Of course food choice is the biggest and most important part of a diet, BUT, so is counting calories. Where do you think calories come from? - <a href="http://www.allsportsnutrition.com/listproducts.php?style=category&value=PROTEIN" target="_blank">protein</a>, carbs, and fat. You must get all these cals from great food sources. In terms on the zig zag diet, I'm a firm believer in it. Check out www.drsquat.com. Go to the articles section and scroll down to the article entitled Zig Zag Diet. It has many great points in there, especially if you plan on staying in shape all year around. I personally feel following this is great, especially if you are not competing. Following a &quot;get huge diet&quot; usually leads to excess fat stores in addition to the muscle you gain, and a cutting diet usually leads to a decrease in muscle mass in addition to the loss of fat. That is where calorie counting becomes key. So check it out and tell me what you think.

    Not all bulking diets require a execess amount of fat!! And not all cutting diets will make you loose muscle with the addition to dropping weight. If things are done right you can do either or with minimal loss in muscle and minimal gains in fat. A matter of fact and has been proven that alot of people including myself have loss fat and gained muscle while cutting on swole gnx. And for the brothers and siters who have been on swoled up prgrams have gained "lean mass" while bulking up and have kept fat to a minimum!!

    So once again, go ahead and focus your daily goals on counting calories while others concentrate on individual macros and the timing aspect. Good luck bro, what works for you might not work for others and what works for me might not work for others-So this is just my .02 on the subject

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    SwoleCat is offline AR Hall of Fame
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    hahah.......

    counting calories.......

    I can think of tons of shit better to do w/my time...........

    count macros.....think short term, not daily........the body has no understanding of long term.............we are human, so we can think ahead.............cells cannot.


    ~SC~

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    buffmike is offline Junior Member
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    wow ..cant we all just get along?? jk.....how about you count the macros first, then count the calories second just to make sure everything matches and so you can see if you need to consume more of a specific nutrient type (protein, fat, carbs)

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    Originally posted by buffmike
    wow ..cant we all just get along?? jk.....how about you count the macros first, then count the calories second just to make sure everything matches and so you can see if you need to consume more of a specific nutrient type (<a href="http://www.allsportsnutrition.com/listproducts.php?style=category&value=PROTEIN" target="_blank">protein</a>, fat, carbs)
    , why even go the extra step if your focus is the macros- if you make adjustments based on your macros--who even cares about the daily issue-- does not even make sense to even count


    ok! ok! for shits and giggles I guess you could do it to impress yourself and to make sure your arithmetic skills still do exist.

  17. #17
    TheJuicer is offline Member
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    Swolecat is definately right but what if you eat too many calories or not enough..hmmm..I dont know but I know that eating good is what I'm really trying to do. Anyone what to tell me there day of eating...How much does a Swolecat eat or anyone else? O yeah how bad was the ham I had on Easter? Thanx again for the info...I'm a spunge and I need more input...hehe

  18. #18
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    I have no idea, buff mike has the diet for you:--that is why he is buff

  19. #19
    buffmike is offline Junior Member
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    hahahah ......one must remember everyone goes about thier diets differently.....I went about mine couting cals and macros....it takes about 10 mins of your time....if you are worried you wont be able to take in too man cals, then just count your macros.....if you have the time and dedication, do both......

  20. #20
    TheJuicer is offline Member
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    I feel great buffmike..I have been doing your new diet and man..I have more energy..THANX! Back about 4 years ago the thing to do was 1g per pound of body weight..that has really changed. Over 300g now..Wow..whats next 400g's

  21. #21
    Matt Foley's Avatar
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    good posts abstract,and congrats swolecat! i had to print this one out so i can read it when i have more time.

  22. #22
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    Buff-- you are right!1 Of course it is not written in stone! there is atkins, bill phillips, richard simmons, weight watchers, jenny craig, there is a whole slew of diets out there for you enjoyment.

    Dedeicated??-- umm--Me not counting my calories has nothing to do with my dedication or anybodys elses dedication. You think Swole brotha is not dedicated?? Do you think the swoldiers are not dedicated??

  23. #23
    buffmike is offline Junior Member
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    my bad about the dedication part....i meant if you want to DEDICATE your time to doing it.....i guess it just sounded different....oh, I def don't question his commitment....diet, supps, workouts, juice....its all dedication....it all takes a plan (I feel) before you jump into any of those peices of the bodybuilding pie.....the trick is experimentation.....i've experimented, and I've found the advice I gave Juicer to work for me....I'm golad to see all is going well so far with you juicer....keep it up and I hope it produces the same results as it did for me.....good luck! abstrack and swole, thanks for the input too....i learned a thing or two more from just this alone.,....

  24. #24
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    Yes Yes!! Good luck to juicer; If all is working then keep at it bro:

  25. #25
    turboboy692002 is offline New Member
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    Grocery list

    Well I'm going to the store tomorrow..please help me with my list..I want to make sure I have it all and dont forget a thing..

    P.S. I love this board..I have learned sooo much!! THANX too alll!!!!

  26. #26
    TheJuicer is offline Member
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    A list would be great..what do you guys think?

  27. #27
    buffmike is offline Junior Member
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    Shoutout abstrack and swole.....I am definitely intergrating my approach cause of the input from you two....instead of counting calories, I am gonna count macros, THEN multiply by how many calories they all possess, then making sure my caloires match. My maintenance cals call around 3400-3500 cals. Doing it his way saved me alot of work.
    For example, my low carb day would need.
    carbs 200g's*4=800 cals
    pro 400g's *4= 1600 cals
    fat 70*9= 630 cals

    total cals= 3030 cals

    ON my highb carb day
    carbs=500*4=2000
    protein 300*4=1200
    fat=65*9=585

    cals= 3785

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